When Should You State Your Religious or Political Affiliation on Your Resume?

Two success experts say it's acceptable to state your political or religious allegiances on your resume -- sometimes.

 

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Some might believe stating your political party or religious background on your resume is a risk not worth taking. That's probably right more times than not, but there are situations when sharing your beliefs can be beneficial, according to two career experts in a USA Today piece.

Patrick O'Brien, a business executive and professor at the University of Miami, says if your beliefs are a core element of who you are, then don't be afraid to let a prospective employer know that. Just be strategic about it. Don't just say you're a Democrat or a Republican, but if you're active in a party, and have participated in event planning, used your organizational skills for causes, and helped mentor others, then share those skills and experiences.

"As with anything else you put on your resume, if you include items related to your religious or political beliefs, look for ways to leverage those affiliations to exhibit the core skills and traits a recruiter will find compelling," O'Brien said.

Susan Davis-Ali, the author of How to Become Successful Without Becoming a Man, agrees with O'Brien, and adds that you should only state your beliefs if you're comfortable talking about the subject in your job interview.

"Being a sporadic attender of a religious or political group will not seem impressive in the interview process. If your affiliation with the group is not impressive (again, impressive means it gets you one step closer to landing the job), then leave it off your resume."

Tell Us What You Think

Have you shared your political or religious beliefs on your resume? Do you think it has helped you land a job? We want to hear from you! Leave a comment or join the discussion on Twitter.

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