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  • What Your Tweets and Posts Tell Recruiters Could Keep You From Getting the Job
    Would you think twice about sharing a mindless "I'm so bored" post on social media if you knew that research shows that people who do so experience higher rates of heart attacks and strokes? What's worse, research that ties social media use to emotional stability/instability is making its way into the hands of people that you probably don't want to be privy to such information: recruiters, hiring managers, and employers. Here's what you need to know about what your social media sharing is saying about you.
  • #PayChat Recap: College ROI
    What's the real value of a college degree? Understanding that many benefits of education are intangible, in an era when student loan debt is higher than ever before and post-graduation employment far from a sure thing, most prospective students want to make sure that their tuition dollars are an investment in their future. PayScale's recently released College ROI Report ranks schools and majors by the return students can expect from their investment. In today's #PayChat on Twitter, we asked readers to share their experiences.
  • Relax! Alleviate Your Anxiety Before a Job Interview
    You polished your resume and got a job interview. You researched the company. You practiced answering questions about your experiences in front of a mirror. You really want this job, and you do possess the qualifications necessary to do it. But you still can't shake that feeling of nervousness or get rid of the butterflies in your stomach. You are not alone; many of us feel anxiety before interviews, especially in today's competitive job market. Here are ways you can alleviate your anxiety and have a good interview.
  • Why You Should Take Your Paid Time Off
    Forty-one percent of American workers don't take all of their vacation days, according to a study by the U.S. Travel Association, despite the fact that 96 percent of respondents recognized the value of taking time off. Without downtime, workers are less productive, less engaged, and just plain less happy at work. So why aren't we taking all our PTO?
  • Color Me Mad: How Colors Impact Productivity and Mood
    Your favorite color might not be the best choice for the paint in your home office. Research shows that certain colors are capable of boosting productivity and mood, while other colors have more of a negative impact on disposition. Read on to learn more about how different hues send different cues to your brain and how that affects your every day.
  • Salary Negotiation Fail, Fixed: What to Do When You Accidentally Lowball Yourself
    Is there any part of the interview process that's more horrifying than answering the dreaded salary requirements question? You can dodge it all you want -- and you probably should -- but if the hiring manager won't budge, you'll probably have to come up with some sort of an answer. Chances are, you'll know right away if you named a number that was lower than you could have requested. The gleam in the HR person's eye will tell you all you need to know. The question is, can you improve the situation, or are you stuck with your range?
  • 3 Ways to Successfully Market Your Expertise Online and Boost Your Career
    Don't you ever wish your dream career would just fall into your lap one day? Thanks to the majestic ways of the internet (and a little due diligence on your part), that fantasy could be a reality. Read on to see how marketing your expertise online can lead to bigger and better opportunities finding their way into your career.
  • A Woman on the 20 By 2020
    Times change, and our understanding of the past changes right along with it. A great many things were different, say, 100 years ago, in America. For starters, women couldn't vote. In fact, the oppression -- marginalization is way too weak a word -- of women and minority groups was so abundant 100 years ago that there is hardly a comparison between their experience then and now. So, it makes sense that we see certain things a little differently today that we did in the past.
  • Everything You Need to Know About the Minimum Wage Debate
    Should we raise the minimum wage? On the surface, it seems like an easy question: only Ebeneezer Scrooge would suggest paying the lowest-earning, hardest-working employees a wage that won't support their families. When we delve deeper, however, the issue gets more complex.
  • Why Psychologists Like the Term 'Mansplaining,' and You Should, Too
    If you've spent any time at all in the blogosphere lately, you've probably heard the term "mansplaining." Even if portmanteaus make you cringe, this one is worth dealing with. Psychologists and sociologists believe that by embracing incendiary language we can, over time, successfully combat pervasive, sexist attitudes in the workplace and everywhere else.
  • Could WeWork Work for You?
    A major shift is happening in the American workforce. The rise of the independent worker is shaking up the way companies and individuals operate. By 2020, freelancers are expected to grow from 7 percent to 16 percent of the workforce. Now, new businesses are cropping up to meet the needs of these workers and help them continue to intentionally blur the lines between work, life, and play.
  • #PayChat: College ROI

    #PayChat: College ROI
    How does where or what you study in college affect your career? Do you need to go back to school or can you learn how to make a successful career with a degree you already have?
  • 5 Ways Woman Can Silence Their Inner Critics to Realize Career Success
    As the saying goes, "you are your own worst enemy," and this is especially true for women in the working world. This type of thinking is what tends to hold women back from realizing the type of career success they want and deserve. We'll take a look at five ways women can confidently take on future opportunities in their careers by simply silencing their inner critics once and for all.
  • You Might Love Your Job, But Your Job Doesn't Love You
    Even if you're the most optimistic, upbeat person in the world, you know that there's no such thing as job security these days. If you're fortunate enough to like your job, however, it's easy to forget about that for the time being. Over at Lifehacker, Alan Henry reminds us why we shouldn't.
  • Why Job Shadowing Is the Key to a Successful Career
    Wouldn't you like to "test-drive" a career before committing to it, much like you do when buying a car? In case you didn't know, you absolutely can and it's called job shadowing. We'll take a look at what job shadowing is, whom it's for, and why it's the bee's knees when it comes to choosing a promising career.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Draft Your Team Like an NFL Manager, How Depression Affects Your Job, and Answering the Second Most-Awkward Interview Question
    Even if you're not into sports, you can learn a lot about leadership -- good and bad -- from watching the managers of professional sports teams. It all comes down to using data to help you make better decisions. Plus, also in this week's roundup: how depression affects working memory, and thus our productivity, and the best way to answer, "Why are you looking for a new job?"
  • Use Parkinson's Law to Save You From Useless Meeting Hell
    You may not be familiar with Parkinson's Law by name, but chances are you're well acquainted with the concept. Cyril Parkinson was a British naval historian and author turned public administration and management scholar. His most popular book, Parkinson's Law: The Pursuit of Progress, was published in 1958. The fundamental ideas that shaped his theories still apply today, and can help guide us as we aim to manage our time more effectively, and conduct better meetings.
  • How to Talk to Your Parents About Majoring in the Humanities
    Choosing to major in any of the humanities disciplines brings with it many intellectual challenges and rewards. You learn a new body of knowledge, how to think, read, and write about it critically, and how to engage in disputes over its issues in productive ways. You also take on the challenge of justifying your major to your parents.
  • Google Chairman Manterrupts Female Tech Leader at SXSW to Mansplain Need for Diversity in Tech
    "Mansplaining" is a term coined to describe the behavior of those men who have the need to explain what they believe are complex topics, in which they may or may not be well-versed, to women in a manner that is elementary enough for even a woman to understand. This very thing happened at SXSW this week, except this time, the "manterrupter" got called out publicly. Here's how it went down.
  • College ROI: What If STEM Isn't for You?
    Every year, one things stands out in PayScale's College ROI report: STEM degrees offer the highest return on students' tuition dollar. That means that the schools that offer degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math tend to come out on top of the ranking. It doesn't mean, however, that you should try to force your artist's heart to embrace STEM.