• Election Stats: Romney Wins with Highest Earning Women

    In today's edition of PayScale Election Stats, we surveyed users to find out if support of a particular candidate changes for men and women depending on how much they earn. Our data on this topic was stark. Read on for the break down of candidate support by gender and income. 

  • Election Stats: Obama Winning With Women

    PayScale surveyed our users to find out which candidate appeals most to each gender. In the 2008 election, Barack Obama was popular among women, receiving 56 percent of their votes, according to exit poll data. Does he carry the support of women voters today? It's the battle of the sexes, election-style. 

  • The History of Women in Tech [infographic]

    This infographic by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers outlines the fascinating history of women in tech. Although women comprise just one-fourth of the workforce in science, tech, engineering and math careers, they've catalyzed some of the most groundbreaking innovations.

  • Election Stats: Voters by Industry [infographic]

    Joe the Plumber was a fixture in the 2008 election, but how will he -- and other workers in the construction industry -- vote this year? PayScale surveyed our users to find out which industries are leaning left and which are leaning right. 

  • Best Majors for Making Money [infographic]

    My childhood plans for my life were simple: go to college, become Princess Leia, get married, and then drive around the country in an RV with my grandmother and my dalmatian, drinking orange juice. Imagine my disappointment when I discovered Texas A&M University did not have a Space Princess major -- not even in the school of liberal arts. I was forced to evaluate my options. Did I want a major that would provide philosophical meaning to my life or did I want to earn a hefty paycheck? (Spoiler alert: I became a writer.) 

  • The Wage Gap: Binders Full of Data

    One of the hottest topics to come out of last night’s second presidential debate is equal opportunities for men and women in the workplace, especially the gap in pay between male and female workers. We at PayScale are always glad to hear people discussing the wages, so we consulted our binders… ah-hem, servers full of data and came up with the following perspective.

  • Election Stats: Nurses and Doctors Pick the President

    When it comes time to vote in November, will doctors and nurses choose to re-elect President Obama, or will they throw their support to Romney instead?

  • Election Stats: Jobs Skills Compared -- Obama Voters vs. Romney Voters [infographic]

    What are the most common job skills among Obama and Romney supporters? PayScale surveyed its users and found that Obama voters are more likely to be sticklers for grammar, while Romney voters would be the ones who could fix broken equipment. 

  • Election Stats: What You Earn vs. How You Vote [infographic]

    How much do Romney and Obama supporters typically earn? PayScale surveyed its users and found there there is a very specific pay range where the two candidates trade the lead: $75,000 - $100,000 per year.

  • Why Mental Health Matters at Work [infographic]

    This infographic by the Samsung Economic Research Institute illustrates why mental health matters at work. Programs that help employees manage and treat stress and mental illness not only boost productivity, but also improve companies' public image.

  • Why You Should Learn to Code [infographic]

    Everyone -- yes, including you -- should learn to code, according to this infographic by OnlineCollege.org. There's never been a better time to get some developer skills under your belt.

  • LinkedIn Survey Reveals the State of the Modern Office [infographic]

    The modern office is far different than the workplaces our parents used, and this infographic by LinkedIn reveals features today's workers demand and ones they'd rather see disappear.

  • Can a College Degree Help You Weather a Recession? [infographic]

    The recession has taken quite a toll on the job market, but workers without college degrees have fared far worse than college grads overall. This infographic from Online Colleges outlines some of the ways in which a college degree can help you weather a recession.

  • Social Media and Work Distractions [infographic]

    Social media and work distractions have a closer connection than you might imagine. This infographic by Red E App explores some of the many ways Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn are preventing you from getting work done.

  • Why You Shouldn't Use 'Mad Men' Characters as Workplace Role Models [infographic]

    The wildly popular AMC series "Mad Men" may be entertaining to watch, but as this RocketLawyer infographic proves, Don Draper and his Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce colleagues certainly shouldn't be thought of as workplace role models.

  • Which Country's Young Professionals Exhibit the Riskiest Tech Behavior? [infographic]

    Hackers, identity thieves and cyber criminals are rampant in today's tech-centric society, and BackgroundCheck.org recently compiled this infographic to suss out once and for all which country's young professionals engage in the riskiest tech behavior.

  • How Do Social Media Restrictions Influence Employee Productivity?

    Many companies have social media policies in place to discourage distraction. This Socialcast infographic for Compliance and Safety explores how these restrictions influence employee productivity.

  • Is Your Star Employee Looking for a New Job? [infographic]

    This Mindflash infographic explores seven signs that your star employee might be looking for a new job. Changes in his or her dress, a productivity drop and unusual requests for time off are just some of these signs.

  • Obesity is Big Business [infographic]

    With an estimated $450 billion in indirect costs as of 2010, obesity is big business. This infographic by Top-Nursing-Programs.com illustrates the impact of overweight and obesity rates in America.

  • Why the US is the No-Vacation Nation [infographic]

    Labor Day weekend might be upon us, but this infographic by Column Five Media for Rasmussen College shows that the U.S. has earned its "no-vacation nation" moniker. In 2011, American workers gave up 226 million vacation days, worth a total of about $34.3 billion. What gives?

    The U.S. is far behind other countries when it comes to federally mandated paid vacation day minimums with a whopping zero. The U.K. has the most with 28, followed by France with 25. Even China offers 10 paid vacation days each year.