• Helicopter Parents Could Damage Children's Careers
    The term "helicopter parent" is used to describe parents who hover over their children, smothering them with concern, attention, advice, and especially involvement. It's important that parents be involved in their children's lives, but helicopter parents, by definition, take it too far. Still, some folks proudly cop to the label, feeling that a desire to protect their kids is natural, and indeed it is. But, this style of parenting, when taken too far, can hurt more than it helps, especially if kids grow into adults and the helicoptering continues.
  • Slack's New Podcast: Stories About Work
    The Silicon Valley company, Slack, which is led by Flickr cofounder Stewart Butterfield, aims to change the way teams communicate in these here modern times. Their app, which makes work more fun (but might keep you there), is gaining popularity in workplaces, and alternative work spaces, across the county.
  • Early Career Success Guide: Don't Forget About the Soft Skills
    Hard skills will help you get the job, but if you want to keep it (and excel) you need soft skills as well. Knowing how to communicate effectively, rebound from a setback, and express commitment to your work will impress the boss, your co-workers, and your company's clients – all of which will make it easier to show off what you can do.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Get Along With the Boss
    Chances are, by the time you start your first "real" job, you've had bosses before. But what was appropriate at the ice cream stand or landscaping gig might not be OK in your new office environment. Even if you've had tons of internships and lots of practice dealing with corporate culture, expect a learning curve when you begin your first professional job. Every company and manager is different. If you want to be a success, you'll need to learn how to adapt and communicate with your particular boss.
  • 5 Tips for Managing, Reducing, and Repurposing Stress
    High levels of stress can be very dangerous, exacerbating existing health problems and even creating new ones. Most Americans report unhealthy stress levels, and 1 in 5 people qualify their stress levels as "extremely high." Even though more than 60 percent of people report that they've tried to reduce their stress in the last five years, more than half, 53 percent, are still trying to meet that goal. In fact, being stressed has become just as American as apple pie – but just because it's common doesn't mean that it's okay.
  • How to End a Toxic Work Friendship
    It's great to have friends at work, and there are a lot of benefits associated with it as well. But, when those friendships turn sour, they can take a toll on you personally as well as professionally. It can be difficult to detach and get distance from a toxic pal when you work together every day. But, it's an important thing to do no matter how tough it might be. Here are some tips for ending toxic workplace friendships.
  • 5 Things Working Mothers Really Want in Their Careers
    Women comprise nearly half of today's workforce. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 47.7 percent of households are dual-income, with both the husband and wife working. What's more, approximately 70 percent of these women are also mothers, who handle a vast majority of the household responsibilities along with their careers. It's not surprising, then, that working mothers are struggling to keep up with the high demands of juggling their personal and professional lives simultaneously. Here's what working mothers need in order to get a fair shot at attaining their goals in and out of the workplace.
  • 6 Things to Do When You Make a Mistake at Work
    We all make mistakes. It's part of life. But, that doesn't make it any easier to recover (in the eyes of others and within yourself) when you misstep at work. We're not talking about navigating a difference of opinion here, but rather an actual error that's plain as day for all to see and know. It can be hard to move through a time or situation where you've fumbled, but it's really important to recover and handle your mistakes in a positive way. Here are some tips.
  • 4 Reasons You Don't Need a Formal Mentor
    When you're new to a field, or even just working in a new position, there's a lot to learn. It's useful to have someone to help you understand the ins and outs of the work. And, it's important to be able to get your questions answered when they pop up. A lot of people feel that there are tremendous benefits to participating in a formal mentor/mentee relationship in order to address these needs. However, there might be another way – or even a better way – to meet the same goals. Here are some reasons you might NOT need a mentor.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: My Co-Worker Plans to Quit After Maternity Leave. Should I Tell?
    When we were kids, the rules of the playground were simple: don't snitch, unless you or someone else was in serious danger. As adults, it's slightly more complicated. For example, what if – like an Ask a Manager reader – you know that your colleague is planning to take paid maternity leave, and then quit? Alison Green's answer to that question, plus Dan Erwin's latest reading list, and Emmelie De La Cruz's tutorial on personal branding, in this week's roundup.
  • College Seniors Are (Unrealistically?) Optimistic About Their Job Prospects
    It's good to be young. Seeing a wide open future sprawled out before you with plenty of awesome fruit just ripe for picking can make you feel like the possibilities are endless. As we get older, a lot of people become more pessimistic, and even bitter. Actually, Americans are pretty gloomy and doomy about the future in general these days. The optimism of our youth is a good thing. But, when it comes to the job market, is that optimism realistic?
  • 3 Ways Veep's Amy Brookheimer Is Every Working Woman's Hero
    Unconscious bias really screws things up for women in the workplace, but the battle is not over just yet. Thanks to the prevalence of more leading ladies on the big screen and on TV who play strong, successful working women, the unconscious bias isn't so unconscious anymore. We'll take a look at three ways Veep's powerhouse character, Amy Brookheimer, is showing working women everywhere that being tenacious, unapologetic, and "bossy" is nothing to be afraid of in their careers.
  • 7 Tips for Working Outdoors
    The sweet, sunny days of early summer make you want to be outside: go to the beach, work in your garden, do anything that involves fresh air and being away from your desk. There's no month like May for tempting us to be outside as often as we can. You may even feel the urge to do usually indoorsy things outside if you can swing it – like your work. And, why not? Here are some tips for working outdoors.
  • Being Phony at Work Is Affecting Your Career Success
    A Deloitte study that analyzed sociologist Erving Goffman's concept of "covering" found that a whopping 75 percent of American professionals are concealing certain facets of their lives in order to excel in their careers, or so they think. Here's why that does more harm than good for an individual's personal and professional life.
  • Horrible Table Manners Might Be Ruining Your Career
    Bad table manners are like any lapse in etiquette – when the problem is coming from someone else, it's immediately apparent, but if you're the offender, you probably don't even realize it's an issue. (This explains such mysteries as why there are still people who belch in public or trim their nails on public transit.) If you are an unseemly eater, you could be damaging your career and not even know it.
  • Overloaded With Meetings? Here's What to Do
    Like it or not, meetings are a part of working life. Meetings are where decisions are made, projects are allocated, announcements are shared, etc. But that's what an ideal meeting looks like – there's action, and something moves forward. The reality is that not all meetings are really that productive. Some meetings are just a drain on everyone's time and actually get in the way of you performing your job.
  • Is Bragging Jeopardizing Your Career? 3 Ways to Tell
    There's nothing wrong with being confident in your abilities, but there's a very fine line between being sure of yourself and being full of it. We will take a look at three key indicators that your boastful ways are, indeed, preventing you from getting where you want to be in your career.
  • Microsoft Delve: An App to Track Your Work-Life Balance
    Identifying that a problem exists is the first step in finding a solution to it. There is no doubt that work-life balance is a huge issue right now. In light of this, a lot of companies are trying to find ways to help us track and improve our time management habits and skills. The new Microsoft app, Delve, is one such tool. It can help you track your work-life balance. Let's take a closer look.
  • Should Offices Have a 'Kids' Table' for Millennials?
    There has always been a generation gap, but thanks to technology, today's gap is wider than it's been since the 1960s. And, this is causing some issues with communication and co-working in offices. Once company thinks it has a unique solution to the problem: a kids' table, just like the one you used to get stuck at during the holidays, aimed specifically at younger workers.
  • Men Lie About How Much They Work in Order to Have Work-Life Balance
    The expectation of working long hours comes with the territory in a lot of industries. The culture of some companies necessitates a high-paced, high-pressure, work-until-you-can-work-no-more lifestyle in order to get ahead – or even to stick around.

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