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  • Facebook and LinkedIn Team Up to Help Women in Tech
    The two social network powerhouses, Facebook and LinkedIn, are joining forces to launch programs that will encourage more women to pursue degrees and careers in what has long been a man's world -- the world of tech. Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg (COO) and LinkedIn's Jeffrey Weiner (CEO) are launching mentoring and support programs at colleges to inspire more women to pursue tech-related education in hopes that they will, one day, fill the thousands of job availabilities in the heavily male-dominant tech industry.
  • The Obamacare Employer Mandate: What Employees Need to Know
    Americans have differing opinions on the Affordable Care Act, which is often referred to as Obamacare. Last year, the individual mandate went into effect, which required a large percentage of Americans to obtain health insurance or risk having to pay a penalty when tax time arrives. This year, a similarly contentious part of the law goes partially into effect: the employer mandate. What this means is that at least some employees finally have a right, of sorts, to have their employers pay for a portion of their health insurance.
  • Tunes to Boost Productivity
    Do you listen to music at work? A recent study suggests that you might be doing more than just drowning out your neighbor's incessant chatter. You could be relieving stress, boosting productivity, and even improving your mood, all of which can make you a better, happier, more efficient worker. If you still need to convince the boss that you're not goofing off every time you don those headphones, consider the facts.
  • Tipping: A Tough Way to (Not) Make a Living
    An HR manager once told me that he preferred to hire workers who had at least some food service experience on their CV. "No one knows how to work harder than a person who has worked for tips," he told me. But does that hard work translate into a decent salary? PayScale's Restaurant Report shows that the answer is often no.
  • Is Your Boss a Theory X Manager?
    In 1960, Douglas Murray McGregor's book The Human Side of Enterprise, proposed that a manager's personal assumptions about human nature determine how that individual manages their employees. McGregor identified two distinct management styles utilized to motivate workers; he called them Theory X and Theory Y.
  • How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love Failure
    Is there anything more useless than fear of failure? It's vestigial, like the tailbone or the appendix. And yet, humans seem to have an ingrained discomfort with the idea that their efforts won't succeed 100 percent of the time. Here's why you should keep fighting against your nature.
  • Sexual Harassment in the Workplace: Should You Let Them Chase You Away?
    As many as one in four women have experienced sexual harassment at work, according to one poll. In some industries, those numbers are worse: a 2014 report from The Restaurant Opportunities Center United found that 70 percent of female food service workers experienced harassment from their bosses, and 90 percent experienced it from customers.
  • How to Make Friends at Work, When You Are a Newbie
    If you are new to your company, in addition to understanding your role, responsibilities, and company culture, you also need to make an effort to get to know your colleagues and make friends. Since you spend most of your waking hours at work, it makes sense to form a healthy bond with your colleagues from the start.
  • 5 Things to Try When You're Having a Bad Day
    No matter how good you are at your job, and no matter how much you enjoy it, bad days happen to everyone once in a while. Maybe you had an awful conversation with a client, or a meeting with your boss was particularly terrible, or maybe it's something that's going on at home that's bothering you – maybe all of the above. Whatever the reason, here are a few things you could try, or keep in mind, that might help when you're having a bad day.
  • Revolva vs. Oprah: Should You Ever Work for Free?
    In a perfect world, everyone with the passion, skill, and willingness to work hard would have his or her dream job -- and a dream salary to match. Reality, of course, is often quite different. But there's a world of difference between making less than you want (or even less than you're worth) and making nothing at all. And yet, for people in the arts, this is often the pitch: work for nothing, hoping that exposure or another project for your portfolio will lead you to real, paying work down the road. The question, of course, is whether or not it's ever worth it to do so. After all, you can't pay the rent with exposure.
  • 9 Tips to Help You Become a Stand-Out Candidate
    Job searching takes a lot out of a person. Updating your resume, searching high and low for job availabilities, anxiously wait for a call back (if you even get one, that is), then rinsing and repeating -- it's time-consuming and stressful, even if you ultimately get your desired result. The process is exhausting and completely not fun, but that doesn't mean you can't be good at it. Here's how to master your job search and build the career of your dreams.
  • Why We Choose the Wrong Career
    Changing jobs is a natural part of building a career in today's world. Many things motivate our desire to try something new, including necessity, desire for new challenges, and the need to make more money. But, for some, there is more to these professional shifts. If you sometimes feel like you're in the wrong profession altogether, you understand. How does this happen, and how did you get here?
  • In Praise of the Office Frenemy
    If you're a reasonable person -- and let's assume that you are -- you probably don't expect to love every single one of your co-workers. On the other hand, unless you're a terrible pessimist, or having a really rough patch in your career, you probably also don't expect to hate them all, either. Now, a new study argues that perhaps your most valuable co-worker is the one who inspires both positive and negative emotions in somewhat equal measure: the office frenemy, if you will. Here's why you need the folks you (occasionally) love to hate.
  • 3 Ways to Take Back Your Weekend
    If you're reading this, you're probably not whiling away the weekend at a ski lodge or even catching your kid's school play. No, instead, once again, you're stealing time from yourself to give back to your employer. If so, you're not alone: according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 34 percent of employed people work on an average weekend day. Still, you'd probably prefer to get some actual rest from your labors; certainly, your productivity would benefit from better work-life balance. Here's how to reclaim your time off.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Nice Guys Finish First, Fixing Work Mistakes, and TMI at Job Interviews
    If you've been on a few job interviews -- or even conducted them yourself -- you know that the most qualified candidate isn't always the one who gets the job. Sometimes, it's a matter of which applicant seems like they'll fit in the best, and sometimes it's just a question of who seems like the person who'd be the most pleasant to have around the office.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 257,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Ticks Up to 5.7 Percent
    Ahead of this morning's report from the Labor Department, economists were predicting a slight slowing of job growth: 230,000 jobs added and an unchanged unemployment rate. Instead, the Employment Situation Summary showed an addition of 257,000 jobs, a slightly higher unemployment rate of 5.7 percent, and a solid increase in average hourly earnings of 12 cents. In addition, November and December's reports were revised upward for a combined total of 147,000 additional jobs, above what was reported.
  • Looking for a Higher Starting Salary? Don't Fall For These Employer Tricks
    If you are in the offer negotiation stage, beware. While you want a higher starting salary, your employer wants to get you in at as low a salary as possible. Stay on your guard and watch for these tactics when it's time to talk numbers.
  • The Best Teams Have Women on Them
    Working in groups is part of everyday life, both personally and professionally. For instance, a family must work as a unit to maintain an orderly household, and, likewise, professionals must utilize teamwork to accomplish company goals. So, what makes a group successful? One study found the secret ingredient: the more women, the better.
  • Walk Your Way to Greater Productivity (or Not)
    We're all looking for ways to improve our productivity, and if it helps with that pesky resolution to get into shape, so much the better. So, when you read about treadmill desks, you might just find yourself jumping up and down with joy. Unfortunately, the productivity end of the equation may have more mixed results than you hoped for.
  • No Paid Sick Leave? What You Need to Know About the Healthy Families Act
    Despite the reality that everyone gets sick at some point and the fact that public health experts advise us to stay home when it happens to us, there are still many workers in the United States who do not have any paid sick leave. For many working-class and middle-class employees, this means effectively that they have no sick leave at all, because they cannot afford to miss out on a day's wages. However, there is a possibility that this problem could be fixed, at least for employees of large and mid-sized employers.