• Are Millennials Changing the Culture of Work?

    What the boss says, goes. Don't put anything online that you wouldn't print out and hang over your desk. Don't expect a free lunch, or a fast promotion, and always remember: your mama doesn't work here.

    Those are the old rules of corporate culture, and most of us – especially if we were born before ubiquitous internet – agree that they're still the smart way to go. After all, what is etiquette, but a way to keep from driving our neighbors crazy, whether those neighbors live across a driveway or on the other side of a cubicle wall?

  • What You're Twice as Likely to Do When You Telecommute
    Telecommuting is on the rise. As the number of folks who work from home increases, new data begin to emerge about their experience. If you're considering telecommuting at some point in the future, the results of a recent survey should be of interest to you.
  • 5 Ways to Avoid Answering the Worst Job Interview Question, 'What's Your Salary History?'
    First things first: anyone who tells you that you can always dodge the salary history question is probably trying to sell you something. The reality of the situation is that sometimes, you just can't wriggle out of answering this question – not if you want to stay a viable candidate for the job. But, that doesn't mean that you should name your price right away. You might be able to get the hiring manager to focus on the future, not the past, and that's what you're hoping for.
  • 5 Emotional Skills Every Worker Should Possess
    If you're looking for work right now, you've probably heard a lot about the importance of developing skills (with technology, for example) as an essential step toward getting hired. But, you may have noticed an awful lot of talk about soft skills, as well. Writing, public speaking, and teamwork are increasingly coveted by employers. High emotional intelligence helps you develop the soft skills on your next employer's wishlist.
  • This Internship Will Pay You $12k to Drink Lots Of Beer
    If you've been looking for a summer internship that actually pays you for your time and labor, your golden opportunity has arrived. And it involves booze. Lots and lots of it. Are you up for the challenge?
  • Everything You Know About Being Successful Is Wrong

    "Research shows that the kind of happiness that does lead to long-lasting fulfillment is the kind of happiness that's derived from positive social relationships with other people," says Dr. Emma Seppälä, the Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. "A life of meaning, a life of purpose, a life characterized by altruism, something greater than oneself."

    A life, in other words, that can feel pretty difficult to create in today's corporate culture, which prizes achievement and productivity. But maybe there's another way to live and work. Seppälä's new book, The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success, examines research on happiness, and makes the case that finding fulfillment builds success, not the other way around.

  • 4 Tips for Getting Along Better With Your Boss
    If you don't like your boss, you probably don't love going to work every day. In fact, bad managers are the number one reason people quit their jobs. No matter how you feel about your boss now, getting along better could make a big difference to your happiness at work. It makes sense to try to fix this dynamic. Here are a few things to keep in mind to help you build a good relationship with him or her.
  • Avoid These 5 LinkedIn Mistakes
    LinkedIn is a powerful networking tool, but like all tools, it's only as good as the person who wields it. Used well, LinkedIn can help you find a new job, hire fresh talent, or just strengthen your professional connections. But, in order to fully maximize the experience, you need a strong profile and a clear goal. You also need to avoid a few common LinkedIn mistakes that most users don't even realize they're making.
  • When an Occupation Becomes Female-Dominated, Pay Declines
    During any debate about the gender pay gap, one argument will eventually emerge: women make less than men because they choose lower-paying jobs. But what if it turns out that women aren't so much choosing low-paying jobs as working at jobs that are low-paid precisely because there are more women in those occupations? If that sounds far-fetched, one study, recently discussed at The Upshot in The New York Times, might change your mind. Researchers analyzed 50 years of U.S. Census data and found that pay drops when professions move from predominantly male to female – in short, if women do a job, it's likely to be low-paid, for no other reason than that women's work is undervalued.
  • Guess Which Company Doesn't Want to Reveal Its Gender Pay Data?
    There is a big movement for tech companies to publicly share data about the gender and racial diversity of their employees. However, while some companies are using this moment of crisis to show commitment to developing a more diverse, more productive workforce, others are less than eager to disclose numbers. In fact, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) just rejected a request from tech giant Amazon for exemption from a request from one of their investors to disclose gender pay data.
  • 3 Reasons Your Boss Should Want You to Work from Home
    Telecommuting can offer workers more flexibility, a greater feeling of independence, and the ability to work from anywhere in the world. It's not just great for you, the employee, either; it can offer real advantages for your employer, as well. If you're trying to convince your boss to let you work from home now and then, you'll want to focus on the ways that letting you telecommute benefits your team and the company as a whole.
  • 3 Redditors' Inspiring Stories of Drastic Career Changes
    It's no secret that many people are unhappy with their current jobs. But did you know that two-thirds of all working adults, and 73 percent of those in their 30s want to change careers? It's a fact of life that many of us have to take jobs that may not be our "dream" jobs, and maybe that concept is a sham anyway. However, that doesn't mean that you have to be unhappy in your current job forever — or that you can't transition to another career where you can still earn a living doing honest, practical work.
  • Why Don't Americans Believe That Robots Are Coming for Their Jobs?
    The concept of robot overlords taking control of mankind dates back long before Will Smith's 2004 magnum opus I, ROBOT, which is, incidentally, now the name of one of those automatic floor vacuums. In fact, stories of computers ruling humanity date back as early as the 1950s (as commenters who know their Asimov will no doubt point out). But these days, it really isn't science fiction. In fact, Wired reported a study by Oxford University researchers that estimated 47 percent of current jobs in the U.S. could very well be automated inside of the next 20 to 30 years. The scary part is that Americans actually agree for the most part with these findings — they're just in denial that they are the ones on the chopping block.
  • New CareerBuilder Survey Reveals What HR Managers Know About the Gender Pay Gap
    The gender pay gap is a complex issue. In order to begin to understand the situation, it's important to appreciate the difference between what PayScale is calling the controlled and the uncontrolled gender pay gap. Not only do women earn less than men for equal work, they also do different jobs in the first place. The truth about the gender pay gap is that it's much more complicated than some people think.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do You Feel Trapped in Your Career?
    The average person changes jobs 10 to 15 times over the course of their career, and spends less than five years at each job. Harder to figure out: how many times they change careers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't track it, and many changes are pretty subtle anyway, as career paths naturally evolve over time. Sometimes, however, you have to make a leap. In this week's roundup, we look at what to do when you need to make a big career change, plus resume rules you should stop breaking, and ways to beat burnout.
  • Planning a Summer Vacation? 5 Reasons to Try for 2 Weeks
    March is about to go out like a lamb, and the blooming flowers and rising temperatures have a lot of people thinking about one thing – vacation. In fact, this is a great time of year to start planning your summer vacation away from the office. Before you submit that time-off request though, here's a thought: can you try for two weeks off?
  • How to Enjoy March Madness Without Driving Your Co-Workers Crazy
    March Madness is upon us – whether that's good or bad depends on your feelings about college basketball, your workplace's culture around sports, and your need to get stuff done between now and April 4. Ideally, you and your co-workers would all be able to enjoy the bonding potential of debating the merits of your favorite teams, without turning the office into a locker room or annoying your colleagues who would choose unpaid overtime over courtside seats.
  • America's Corporate Culture Is Too Stuck In Its Ways to Allow Paid Family Leave to Work
    The U.S. is one of the few countries in the world that doesn't mandate any kind of paid family leave, and only 12 percent of private-sector employees in this country have access to it. This is despite the increasing number of elite employers who offer generous perks designed to improve work-life balance. What will it take for paid family leave to truly gain traction in the U.S.? Beyond a law requiring it, we'd need nothing less than a complete cultural shift. Even if paid leave were to be granted tomorrow to every employee nationwide, there's one problem that would still remain: an unsupportive corporate culture that makes it hard to take time away from work to take care of family.
  • 7 Ways to Change Your Career Luck, Starting Today
    When it comes to your career, there's a lot that's outside your control. You can't make a job opening appear when you really need one, or keep an awesome boss from transferring to another department, or boost the budget for raises and the opportunities for promotion. At the end of the day, pretty much all you can control is yourself and your behavior. The good news is that sometimes, that's enough.
  • What We Can Learn About Meetings From the Rare People Who Actually Enjoy Them
    Complaining about meetings is the unofficial sport of many workplaces. In fact, according to a recent Harris poll, sponsored by the online collaboration company Clarizen, 17 percent of employees said they would literally rather watch paint dry than attend a meeting, and eight percent would rather undergo a root canal. However, every now and again you come across a person, or even a group of people, who actually really enjoy meetings. Maybe we can learn something important about ourselves, or at least about how we collaborate, from thinking about their approach. Here are a few ideas to consider.

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