• The Yelp Open Letter Makes Me Glad Social Media Arrived After I No Longer Knew Everything
    In 2000, I worked for a startup. The name doesn't matter – like most startups, it didn't make it. The important thing, for the purposes of our story, is that I was a recent grad, awe-inspiringly entitled, fairly poor, and perhaps not very good at my job yet. The only thing I had going for me was that there was no social media, so there was no way for me to ruin my reputation with more than, say, three people. In this, I was much more fortunate than Talia Jane, the recently terminated Yelp/Eat24 employee. Jane's open letter to her CEO, which she published on Medium a few days ago, ignited the kind of internet firestorm that's generally reserved these days for arguing about Bernie Bros or Donald Trump. The question, of course, is what to make of her letter and its aftermath. Is she an entitled whippersnapper who doesn't know how to sacrifice, or a voice of her generation pointing out systemic unfairness ... and getting punished for it?
  • Ask a Recruiter: The Top 6 Salary Negotiation Mistakes

    Getting a job offer is exciting, but the subsequent salary negotiation that takes place before you sign on can be nerve-wracking. Wouldn't it be nice to find out what's going through the recruiter's head during this process? Well, welcome to PayScale's newest blog series, "Ask a Recruiter." In this inaugural edition, Caitlin Williams, a member of PayScale's own Talent Acquisition team, shares the biggest mistakes she sees time after time in salary negotiations.

    Salary negotiation is a normal step in every job offer process. Not negotiating means leaving money on the table, but negotiating poorly can be just as dangerous. Not to give away the recruiter "secret sauce," but before you accept that new job offer, make sure to avoid these top salary negotiation mistakes. Trust me, I've seen them all!

  • Liars of Reddit Share Their Greatest Resume Achievements
    When it comes to creating resumes, honesty is the best policy. But sometimes, the prospect of a brand-new, shiny job can convince even the most honest person to add a little bit of puffery to their resume. Based on these tales from Redditors who admit to lying on their resumes, we can see that this type of strategy can have a number of different and surprising outcomes.
  • 3 Ways Job-Hopping Might Mean Leaving Money on the Table
    A big incentive for jumping from one job to the next, in a relatively short space of time, is that it makes it feasible to climb up the income ladder. Every time you are offered a new job, it's an opportunity to brush up your salary negotiation skills and seek out better compensation. That said, there might be some ways that job-hopping can hurt your earning power or net worth.
  • 4 Signs That the Job Market Really Is Improving
    The road back from the Great Recession has been a long and winding one, that's for sure. Even when some economic indicators have given us hope, other factors (often the ones that matter most to workers) have lagged behind. For example, despite lower unemployment rates, wage growth has been slow. However, now that the first quarter of 2016 is well underway, there are some indications that the job market might truly be improving. Here's what you need to know.
  • Roger Goodell Makes a Lot More Money Than NFL Players, and Here's Why You Should Care
    NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell took a pay cut last year. Before you feel too bad for him, however, keep in mind that even after a $1 million cut, Goodell made $34.1 million over the 2014-5 season – more than every football player in the league, save Atlanta Falcons QB Matt Ryan, whose signing bonus brought his pay up to $36.5 million. Why are we even paying attention to millionaires, when the average American worker would be happy to score more than a 3 percent annual raise? Well, the commish-to-player pay ratio reminds us that the guys at the top of the corporate ladder often far out-earn the people whose work keeps them there. In short, it's not just that the CEO makes more than you do; it's that the CEO makes a lot more than you do.
  • 4 Things to Do If You Hate Your Job But Can't Quit Just Yet
    Raise your hand if you hate your job and can't do anything about it right now? If you raised your hand, you're not alone. In fact, according to Gallup, only about 30 percent of workers describe themselves as being engaged at work on any given day. Plus, the numbers aren't much better for managers, with only around 35 percent reporting engagement at work, so your boss's enthusiasm for the job might also be a factor. Knowing that information isn't going to make your situation any better, but these four tips just might. Read on, because there is hope for you.
  • #MondayMotivation: 5 Ways to Fool Yourself Into Getting Stuff Done
    Maybe you hop out of bed on Monday mornings with a song in your heart and a to-do list already coalescing in your brain. If so, don't be hurt if your co-workers avoid you until they've had their second cup of coffee. For many of us, the transition back into the work week is rough, to say the least. Whether the weekend was full of chores or fun, switching back to office mode is a challenge. Sometimes, the only answer is to play little tricks on ourselves, in order to make work happen.
  • Should You Tell Your Friends and Family How Much You Make?
    Discussing money might be the only real conversational taboo left in America. We've recognized, over time, that sharing our ideas and even our fears with trusted friends and family only builds our understanding and makes our lives better. These days, it's okay to talk about the troubles we're having with our children or even our marriages. We can talk about race, religion, identity, etc., outside of work. But, do we talk with each other about our salaries? Oh goodness, absolutely not. That's way too personal, and it's a conversation fraught with danger. But, what if this is a mistake? There may be some real upsides to loosening up our conversations about money.
  • Millennials: Thinking About Quitting Your Job? You're Not Alone.
    When you hear about a lot of people all leaving the same company, you may tend to think that there's something wrong with the organization. But what does it mean when people from the same generation are all planning to leave their jobs? Well, that's what is happening with Millennials. In fact, a recent survey revealed that two out of three Millennial workers plan to quit their current jobs by 2020 — which is now less than four years away. There may be some signs it's time for you to consider leaving, too.
  • How to Work With Friends
    It's no secret that we spend a lot of time with our co-workers. In fact, while there's only about a 52 percent chance of us spending 30 hours a week with our family, there's a 91 percent chance we will spend that much time with our co-workers. Like it or not, they're the people that get the most of our time: friendship may very well be inevitable. When you do begin to form those bonds of camaraderie, here's how to keep it from getting weird.
  • 3 Reasons Why Good Professionals Make Not-So-Good Career Decisions
    There are two types of professionals in the world: those who make mistakes in their careers and learn from them, and those who don't. For the latter, the odds always seem to be against them and life never seems to give them the break they need. Maybe – just maybe – it's not life that's to blame for their misfortunes, but rather the bad decisions these good, capable professionals keep making that are the culprit. Let's take a look at three reasons why good professionals make not-so-good decisions that end up costing them the career success they truly deserve.
  • 5 Things You Should Know About Working as a Nurse
    Some people are lucky enough to feel that they have a real calling toward one particular job or career field. Nurses tend to be these kinds of people. If you know someone with a profound desire to help others and a fierce work ethic and intellect to match, they just might work in nursing. But, while the job can be quite fulfilling, it's far from an easy career path. Let's get real about what it's like to work as a nurse in 2016. Here are a few things you should know.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Your LinkedIn Profile Helping Other People Get Hired?
    Recruiters do not care about you. OK, that sounds harsh. A better way of putting it might be, "Recruiters care about finding stellar candidates, which may or may not include you." The goal when you're buffing up your LinkedIn profile is to make sure that it's driving recruiters toward you, and not toward your friends and colleagues. In this week's roundup, we look at expert advice that will help you tighten up the leaks in your Linkedin, plus how to deal with a toxic work environment, and which questions to ask in order to start off a new job on the right foot.
  • 7 Big Ways Emotional Intelligence Can Help You Get Ahead
    Our resumes and online professional profiles are chock full of pieces of evidence chosen to support and justify our qualifications. But, it turns out that our emotional intelligence (a trait rarely highlighted during the job search process) could be one of the greatest determinants of our professional success. Emotional intelligence is more important that most folks realize. Here's how it helps you at work.
  • Take Note, Kanye West: These 3 Jobs Should Totally Exist (and Pay $1 Billion)
    If you spend any time on Twitter – or anywhere online – you probably know that Kanye West recently asked Mark Zuckerberg for a billion-dollar investment in "Kanye West ideas." Jimmy Kimmel pointed out the most obvious flaw in this plan, which is that it's not such a great idea to pitch the inventor of Facebook on Twitter, but there's another small fly in the ointment, as well: from an investment perspective, Kanye appears to be saying that Yeezy Industries is worth more than Snapchat's $486 million funding round, one of the highest in history. And, needless to say, there are no jobs that pay $1 billion year. But maybe there should be.
  • How Samantha Bee Got Such a Diverse Writing Staff
    The latest entry into the late-night talk show ring is none other than Daily Show alum Samantha Bee and her new show, Full Frontal. She's a remarkable newcomer for a few reasons. First, she's a woman in a sea of dudes behind desks (a literal representation of this was recently published by Vanity Fair). Secondly, she's created a writing staff that is atypical for comedy staffs — it's 50 percent female and 30 percent nonwhite. So how did she manage that? The answers could surprise you.
  • The 3 Strangest Jobs in the World
    Sometimes job hunting can make you pine for careers you never considered before. Six months of rejection emails can get you thinking, "Maybe I'll just join the circus." And despite what your mother thinks, that's actually not the worst or most far-out job you could take. If you think you've got it weird at work, there's a whole world of strange jobs waiting for you. We found some really weird ones, and maybe you'll be inspired to find the career you never knew you wanted.
  • #Throwback Productivity: Take Notes on Paper
    When was the last time you regularly used pen and paper? Was it for cursive practice in the third grade? Doodling on handouts in high school while you daydreamed through that lecture on Hamlet? Is it possible that you're starting to get bored with taking down all of your mental notes in that ever-convenient-yet-one-dimensional "notes" app on your phone? Maybe it's time to give old paper a second chance.
  • What Is the Value of Emotional Labor at Work?
    Remembering birthdays, planning the holiday party, showing a new team member around the office and where the best nearby coffee shop is: these are all examples of emotional labor at work. While many happy employees would like to think of themselves as completely willing to take on these seemingly small tasks, more often than not, they fall on female workers. Just as at home, the majority of this type of care and support in the workplace is expected of women in ways it might not be from their male co-workers. What's the impact of such expectation?

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)


Comp Managers: Start Here »
ADVERTISEMENT