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  • The 5 Best Jobs for College Students
    Attending college is astronomically expensive. Gone are the days when you could work part-time and over the summers, and come away with enough money to float your tuition and fees out-of-pocket. Still, even if you're paying for your education with loans and grants, extra money comes in handy when you're in school. The challenge is to find jobs that line your pockets without interfering with your studies. As part of PayScale's data report, The Best Jobs for You, we looked at a few of the best part-time jobs for people who don't yet have a degree, but are working toward one.
  • Men Lie About How Much They Work in Order to Have Work-Life Balance
    The expectation of working long hours comes with the territory in a lot of industries. The culture of some companies necessitates a high-paced, high-pressure, work-until-you-can-work-no-more lifestyle in order to get ahead – or even to stick around.
  • Salary Factors: Here's How Your Employer Decides How Much You Get Paid
    What goes into determining how much money you make? In most organizations, salaries are determined by mapping roles and job descriptions with similar organizations (competitors) through a third-party compensation and benchmarking service. A typical job is broken down into its responsibilities, criticality, complexity, and market availability to name a few crucial factors. Based on these factors, the range for a job is arrived upon.
  • Americans Are Working Longer, Kissing Retirement Goodbye
    Growing older should be an enjoyable time in a person's life, but that seems to be a thing of the past, based on recent studies that found people are working much longer out of necessity. Read on to see why many aging professionals are working well past their prime and postponing retirement – sometimes, indefinitely.
  • 4 Ways the Geller Law Group Helps Women Have It All
    Women accounted for just 16.5 percent of law partners in 2013, despite the fact that they graduated from law school in equal numbers during the previous decade. Being a law partner inducts you into a high-pressure system with long hours and limited flexibility. It's the kind of job that practically requires a stay-at-home spouse in order to keep any kind of a personal life running smoothly. But, that arrangement isn't available to everyone. Some ambitious lawyers are left wondering how they can do both – that is, be a lawyer and have a life, and maybe even a family. At the Geller Law Group, an all-woman firm, it just might be possible.
  • Zappos Goes Manager-Free, Employees Leave in Droves
    If you've ever had a bad boss, you've probably fantasized about a working life without managers. How much would you get done, if you didn't have to deal with the politics, the inane requests, the useless meetings designed to further their goals at the expense of your own? But before you ponder making a leap to a company with a flatter management structure, keep this in mind: Zappos, the online shoe retailer known for speedy delivery and top-notch customer service, just made the move to a manager-free structure – and nearly 14 percent of employees liked the idea so much, they took a buyout instead.
  • 5 Ways Your 'Tude Is Damaging Your Career Potential
    We hate to break it to you, but the reason you aren't moving up in your career might not be because of him, or her, or them – it might be because of your poor attitude. It's easy to point the finger at others or attribute your dead-end career to incompetent co-workers, however, there comes a time when you have to realize that the culprit is you. Take a look at five of the common career-ruining attitude types below to see if you're guilty of damaging your own career. Good luck!
  • Hillary Clinton Fights Like a Woman for Paid Leave
    It was Mother's Day on Sunday, so it's probably not really surprising that Hillary Clinton released a video about her mother (and daughter and granddaughter). But, set against the birth of her granddaughter, she also briefly retells a story about a nurse who said, "Thank you for fighting for paid family leave." Is it just political posturing, or can we finally hope for some resolution to the shameful state of family leave in the U.S.?
  • Introducing Workplace Wonk, PayScale's Weekly Career News Show
    What are the hottest career news story of the week – or at least, the ones that mean the most to your career? If you're drowning in headlines and don't have time to click every one, tune into PayScale's new weekly career news show, Workplace Wonk, starring PayScale's Managing Editor, Aubrey Bach. As the Workplace Wonk, she'll tell you which stories got the most attention from recent readers, plus offer insight into how they can affect you and your job.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Roxie Hunt, Hair Stylist/DIY Hair Mogul
    Most hair stylists cut and color hair. For Roxie Jane Hunt, however, shears and color baths were just the beginning. Over the past decade, the Pacific Northwest-based stylist, writer, entrepreneur, and mother of two has used her cutting and coloring chops as the springboard for a bonafide DIY hair empire that extends far beyond the walls of a salon or the conventional tools of her trade.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Giulia Heiman, Bi-coastal Hairstylist, Beauty Columnist, Entrepreneur
    While most stylists would consider a permanent chair at a prestigious salon in New York City the most coveted of covetable gigs in their industry, for Seattle-born and NYC/LA-based hairstylist Giulia Heiman, cutting her chops as a Senior Stylist at the Ted Gibson Salon on 5th Avenue was merely a stepping stone for a larger, even more unique career entirely of her own making.
  • How to Get the Job When You're 'Overqualified'
    One of the reasons that many qualified candidates do not hear back – or do not get shortlisted in the first place – is because they are overqualified. Why would you consider a job that's beneath your level? The reasons vary. Maybe you took a break and are now looking at reentering the job market, or you were laid off and now you need to start somewhere, or you really love the job you do, and want to stick to a similar role elsewhere. Whatever your reason, there are ways you can tackle the problem of being perceived as overqualified.
  • Pope Francis Weighs in on Equal Pay Debate
    Although the issue has been with us forever (and isn't predicted to end until 2058) the equal pay debate seems to be heating up right now. Recently released research shows that the gender wage gap exists across all regions and most industries, and the effects are felt by women of every age and from every background.
  • 3 Pieces of Career Advice From Famous Mothers, on Mother's Day
    To paraphrase Mark Twain, when you're a kid, your mother doesn't know anything – but it's surprising how wise she gets, as you grow older yourself. No wonder, then, that many of us grown-up "kids" turn to dear old Mom when the going gets tough. Here, in honor of Mother's Day, we present some of the best career advice famous moms have to offer.
  • 25 Invigorating Quotes to Ignite the Leader Within
    Yehuda Berg once said, "Words are singularly the most powerful force available to humanity. We can choose to use this force constructively with words of encouragement, or destructively using words of despair." In this case, the words contained in this post are intended to be a driving force that will ignite the leader within you and motivate you to go after your wildest dreams today.
  • Practice 'The Golden Rule' to Fuel Your Career's Success
    Everyone wants to be successful in his or her career, but, unfortunately, far too many professionals go about it the wrong way. It may seem like trying to make it in this dog-eat-dog world requires a person to take out the rest of the pack, however, as it turns out, true success comes from joining forces with other like-minded individuals and conquering together. Think this is a bunch of bologna? Read on to see why triumphing in your career depends on the success of those around you.
  • What You Need to Know About Your Right to Unionize
    Unions' position in America has changed drastically over the last few generations. Large swaths of our population used to work in industries like manufacturing and many of those industries were unionized. Then companies began outsourcing jobs to other countries, and more and more Americans found themselves in service industry positions that often are non-union positions. Only you can know whether a union is right for you, but if you think it may be and you are not currently a union member, you need to understand what your legal rights are when it comes to unionizing.
  • Is It Ever OK to Drink During Your Lunch Break?
    The return of AMC's Mad Men for its final season brings about mixed feelings for a lot of viewers. There's some sadness that it's almost over, but it's also a lot of fun to reacquaint ourselves with the characters, and culture, we've come to love. One aspect of the show that seems to have really made an impression, even with folks who don't watch, is the drinking. In addition to introducing young people to old-timey cocktails like Manhattans and gimlets, the liquor fueled lifestyle of Mad Men left us in awe. For most of us, drinking during lunch is a rarity at best – a far cry from having wet bar in every office.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Deal With Being Embarrassed at Work
    If you've never made a mistake at work, the saying goes, you're not working hard enough. But, that's small consolation when your face is red and you're stammering out an apology to your boss or client or co-worker. In this week's roundup, we look at what to do when you're embarrassed at your job – plus, how to find the right corporate culture for you, and how to steer an interview, without looking like you're embarking on a hostile takeover.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 223,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Falls to 5.4 Percent
    Economists predicted today's release from the Labor Department would should gains of 228,000 jobs last month, and a dip in the unemployment rate of one-tenth of a percent, and The Employment Situation Summary largely bore out their forecast. The economy added 223,000 jobs in April, and unemployment fell from 5.5 percent to 5.4 percent. The news wasn't entirely rosy, however: the Bureau of Labor Statistics also revised the previous month's numbers downward from 126,000 jobs to 85,000 jobs.