• After 'Religious Freedom' Becomes Law in Indiana, Businesses Vote With Their Dollars
    On Thursday, Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, effectively allowing businesses to refuse to serve gay customers. In the days since, some companies have responded by restricting or terminating their investments in Indiana.
  • Negotiation Stories: 'The Best/Worst Time I Asked for a Raise'
    When PayScale compiled the Salary Negotiation Guide, less than half of the 31,000 respondents said that they had ever negotiated salary. Why don't more people ask for a raise? For 28 percent of those who declined to negotiate, it was because they felt uncomfortable asking for more money. When you read some of these stories, it will become clear why some people feel that way.
  • 3 Ways Colleges Are Wasting Your Money
    Want to get mad? If you have ever attended or plan to attend college, take a look at a Ted Scheinman's recent Pacific Standard article, entitled How Colleges Misspend Your Tuition Money. The URL, which includes the phrase "pay for decent teachers, not Dr. Phil," gives the first hint of what lies ahead. Hint: it's not a sound investment in teaching staff, but if you've talked to any underpaid, untenured adjunct faculty lately, you probably already knew that.
  • Why You Should Take Your Paid Time Off
    Forty-one percent of American workers don't take all of their vacation days, according to a study by the U.S. Travel Association, despite the fact that 96 percent of respondents recognized the value of taking time off. Without downtime, workers are less productive, less engaged, and just plain less happy at work. So why aren't we taking all our PTO?
  • Salary Negotiation Fail, Fixed: What to Do When You Accidentally Lowball Yourself
    Is there any part of the interview process that's more horrifying than answering the dreaded salary requirements question? You can dodge it all you want -- and you probably should -- but if the hiring manager won't budge, you'll probably have to come up with some sort of an answer. Chances are, you'll know right away if you named a number that was lower than you could have requested. The gleam in the HR person's eye will tell you all you need to know. The question is, can you improve the situation, or are you stuck with your range?
  • Everything You Need to Know About the Minimum Wage Debate
    Should we raise the minimum wage? On the surface, it seems like an easy question: only Ebeneezer Scrooge would suggest paying the lowest-earning, hardest-working employees a wage that won't support their families. When we delve deeper, however, the issue gets more complex.
  • You Might Love Your Job, But Your Job Doesn't Love You
    Even if you're the most optimistic, upbeat person in the world, you know that there's no such thing as job security these days. If you're fortunate enough to like your job, however, it's easy to forget about that for the time being. Over at Lifehacker, Alan Henry reminds us why we shouldn't.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Draft Your Team Like an NFL Manager, How Depression Affects Your Job, and Answering the Second Most-Awkward Interview Question
    Even if you're not into sports, you can learn a lot about leadership -- good and bad -- from watching the managers of professional sports teams. It all comes down to using data to help you make better decisions. Plus, also in this week's roundup: how depression affects working memory, and thus our productivity, and the best way to answer, "Why are you looking for a new job?"
  • College ROI: What If STEM Isn't for You?
    Every year, one things stands out in PayScale's College ROI report: STEM degrees offer the highest return on students' tuition dollar. That means that the schools that offer degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math tend to come out on top of the ranking. It doesn't mean, however, that you should try to force your artist's heart to embrace STEM.
  • 5 Career Lessons From the Notorious R.B.G.
    It's never too late in life to change the world ... or become an internet meme. In the case of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, changing the world has been her full-time occupation for most of the past eight decades. Internet fame, on the other hand, descended more recently.
  • 3 Ways to Magically Transform Yourself Into a Lucky Person
    Even if you're not superstitious, it's hard not to ascribe other people's good fortune to luck. Everyone knows that one person who seems to always be in the right place at the right time, getting more than their fair share of promotions, raises, and desks near the window. (Understanding, of course, that their fair share should be "equal to or less than you're getting.") So how do these folks do it?
  • When It Comes to Job Skills, American Millennials Are in a Race to the Bottom
    The youngest workers, the ones who grew up alongside the latest and greatest technologies, have always been assumed to be more skilled in their use. It's probably been like this since the invention of the typewriter, but it's increasingly true now, in an era when most office jobs rely on digital technologies that adapt seemingly by the minute. In addition, today's young workers are more educated than ever before, boasting more years of education than any previous generation. There's just one problem: recent research shows that Gen Y workers in the U.S. are anything but highly skilled.
  • What a Good Boss Does That Others Don't
    Bad managers are the No. 1 reason workers leave their jobs, so the importance of having (and being) and good boss can't be overstated. The problem, of course, is that it's difficult to arrive at a consensus of what this means. What is it, exactly, that good managers do and bad managers don't?
  • College ROI Report: Where to Go to School If You Love to Party (or Want to Do Anything But)
    If you're in the process of choosing a college, you're probably neck-deep in facts and figures. While it's essential to consider the data when making your choice, if you ignore everything but earning potential and graduation rates, you might wind up picking a school that looks great on paper, but is the worst possible place for you, the individual, to build your academic career. The best school for you is the one that takes all your needs into account, including career path, choice of major, and preferred campus culture. With this in mind, PayScale's College ROI report offers lists of the best schools for sports fans, liberal arts majors, future businesspeople, and much more. For example, if you're interested in a party school or need a place that keeps it clean, the following schools might be for you.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Time Management Lies, Crazy Interview Questions, and What Workers Want More Than Free Food
    If you've ever interviewed at a tech company -- or any startup -- you've probably had a hiring manager try to sell you on the value of fun perks like free food, in-office foosball, and other swag and snacks. In reality, though, these extras are worth much less than other considerations. For example, dealing with a bad boss isn't worth all the cereal General Mills will ever produce.
  • Vodafone Offers 16-Week Maternity Leave, Full Pay for Part-Time Work After
    Last week, Vodafone Group announced that it will offer 16 weeks of paid maternity leave to employees at all 30 of its companies around the world by the end of the year. In addition, returning mothers will be offered a flexible work schedule after their leave is over: for six months, they will be allowed to work 30 hours a week, while retaining their full-time salary.
  • College ROI Report: Will You Earn Enough to Pay Off Your Debt?
    Student loan debt is on the rise. In 2011, 51 percent of first-time, full-time college students had took out student loans, according to the National Center of Education Statistics, an 11 percent increase from 10 years prior. The average size of those loans also increased by 36 percent. During the same period, the country experienced one of the worst recessions in its history, offering college students fewer resources to draw on, in order to offset loans, and dimmer prospects of high-earning employment after graduation. In the latest edition of the College ROI report, PayScale examines which colleges and universities offer the best return and lowest debt load for prospective students.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup:  Kickstart Your Workday, Career Lessons at Age 23, and Why Cover Letters Still Exist
    How do you start your workday? If you, like many of us, are generally a little bit late, it could be by grabbing the caffeinated beverage of your choice and hurriedly scanning your inbox. But maybe it's time for a reboot.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 295,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Falls to 5.5 Percent
    Economists predicted gains of 240,000 jobs for February, but this morning's release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics beat expectations with 295,000 jobs added, and an unemployment rate that declined 0.2 points to 5.5 percent -- the lowest in six and a half years.
  • PayScale's 2015 College ROI Report: Will Your Degree Pay Off?
    Student loan debt has more than quadrupled over the past 20 years, according to Pew Research Center. In 2012, the average loan total was $29,400, and seven out of 10 students graduated with debt. No wonder that many prospective students (and their parents) consider the return on their college investment before choosing a school or program. PayScale's 2015 College ROI Report ranks the schools and majors whose graduates receive a high rate of return from attending -- in other words, they earned back their tuition and fees, and then some, and then went on to earn much higher salaries than they would have without their degree.

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