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  • If You're Unemployed for More Than 6 Months, Getting a Job Becomes Really Hard

    Lately, we tend to talk the fate of the long-term unemployed in terms of extending their unemployment benefits, partly because the machinations of Congress are easier to discuss than the vague hope that folks who've been out of work for 27 weeks or more will be able to find jobs. Worse, there's good evidence that many of them won't find work -- perhaps ever.

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  • 4 Time Management Tips That Can Save You Hours a Week

    If you're reading this on Sunday, in between doing work-related tasks that you just didn't have time for during the week, have hope. With a few small changes, you can manage your time so that you never (well, hardly ever) have to work the weekend again.

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  • 3 Ways to Be More Engaged at Work

    Only 13 percent of workers across the world are "engaged" in their work, according to Gallup. That's actually a 2 percent improvement for stats from the previous year. Still, it's sad to think of 87 percent of workers toiling away at a job that doesn't make them happy. What can we do, short of winning the lottery and buying the company, to make work a more engaging experience?

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  • Cat Videos Are a Cottage Industry

    Looking at cute animal photos and videos at work may or may not be making you more productive, but it's certainly making their owners a lot richer -- some of them, anyway.

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  • How to Answer the Interview Question, 'Tell Me About Yourself'

    It's often the first thing hiring managers ask candidates in job interviews, and the first opportunity to really screw things up. Unsurprisingly, most of us have a really hard time summarizing our careers, skills, and interests in the conversational equivalent of a tweet. But having a job search "elevator pitch" is a really important part of acing the interview.

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  • If More Women Do 'Male' Jobs, Will Pay Equalize?

    There are a lot of theories about why women still make less than men. Some experts hold that the problem is institutional sexism, others that women don't speak up enough and ask for what they want. PayScale's own report found that women are paid less, in part, because they choose work that gives back to society, instead of their own bottom line. The question, of course, is what we can do to reverse the trend, and compensate men, women -- and "male" and "female" professions -- fairly.

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  • How to Rock Your First Job

    If you're graduating this spring, you're probably full of trepidation about what awaits you on the other side of that commencement ceremony -- even if you've been lucky enough to line up a job. No matter how casual the corporate culture you're about to enter, it'll be a big change from your life as a student. Here's what to expect.

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  • 3 Free Apps to Make You More Productive

    In the olden days, productivity tools were a bit bulkier: pen, paper, the occasional actual, physical clock. Now, you can have just about anything you need to improve your efficiency, right in your phone or tablet. These are some of the best apps for getting stuff done.

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  • Want a Big Favor? Don't Be Afraid to Ask

    President Obama will speak at UC Irvine's commencement ceremony this June. How did the school score the most powerful man in the country to speak at graduation? Simple: they asked.

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  • Here's How to Get Along With Your Messy Co-Worker

    Need another reason to hate the open office? Here's one: your messy co-worker's cluttered desk becomes your problem.

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  • Which Occupations Earn More Than Their Parents Did?

    If you polled a group of teenagers, you might get the impression that their future occupations would have nothing to do with what boring old mom and dad did for a living. Catch up with them a few years later, and it's clear that parents do affect career choices, if not exactly in the way you'd expect.

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  • Some Companies Want SAT Scores From Potential Hires

    If you didn't wow your guidance counselor with your SAT scores, but still got into and graduated from college, you might have thought that the tyranny of the College Board had receded from your life. But not so fast: some big employers like Goldman Sachs or Amazon still ask candidates for their SAT scores, decades after the test. Why would companies put so much weight on tests you took before you could legally vote?

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  • CEOs Received Smaller Raises Last Year

    The top CEOs in the US got a 1 percent raise last year, according to disclosures from 46 companies in the Standard & and Poor's 500. The previous year, CEOs' pay jumped 15 percent.

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  • The Most Important Part of the Job Interview (That You're Probably Forgetting)

    If you're at all interested in getting a given job, you prepare thoroughly ahead of time, researching the company and position, doing practice interview questions, even choosing your interview outfit with special care. But there's one thing you probably aren't doing, and it might be costing you the job: odds are, you probably haven't given a thought about how to close the interview.

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  • The 5 Things Great Managers Do Every Day

    If you've ever left a job because of a bad manager -- and you wouldn't be the first -- you know that having a good boss is an essential factor for job satisfaction and productivity. If you've ever managed everyone yourself, you know how hard it is to do well. Sometimes, it's hard to even understand what managing well entails. But recent analysis from Gallup shows that managers who do certain very specific things improve employee engagement, benefiting both workers and the company.

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  • 5 Ways to Be Luckier at Work

    Even if you're not particularly superstitious, it's easy to ascribe the things that happen to you in your career to luck (either good or bad). In fact, you can make your own good luck at work, just by making a few simple changes in your life.

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  • Another Great Reason to Help Others: It'll Help Your Career

    "Nice guys finish last." It's the real-life version of reality TV's favorite canard, "I'm not here to make friends" -- and it's probably just as useless as a personal motto. In his recent article in The Atlantic, Adam Grant argues that doing good things for others can have real benefits for your career -- eventually.

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  • 5 Ways to Kill Productivity in Your Next Meeting

    Ah, meetings. Ostensibly a way to communicate decisions, brainstorm ideas, and keep the team running in the same direction, they are also one of the better ways to allow productivity to grind to a halt. Ideally, we'd all make the best of meetings, and avoid behaviors that waste everyone's time and the company's money. In reality, of course, many of us are guilty of at least one of the following:

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  • How to Lead When You're Not the Boss

    Managing people when you're actually in charge of them is far from easy, but at least you have a variety of carrots and/or sticks to bring into play. When you're the technical lead on a project, but not actually the boss, things get confusing in a hurry.

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  • No More Written Resumes?

    Gone are the days when choosing card stock was an essential part of the resume process. Sure, you probably print out a couple couples of your CV to bring with you to job interviews, but for the most part, resume distribution takes place electronically. Thanks to social networking, LinkedIn in particular, formal resumes -- even electronic versions -- are less important than they used to be. Will there ever come a time when we do away with them altogether?

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