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  • How to Stop Beating Yourself Up for Mistakes at Work

    What's the most stressful thing that ever happened to you at work? If you're like most of us, making a mistake is at least in the top five. The problem, of course, is that there's no way to avoid messing up at some point. As the saying goes, if you never make mistakes, you're not working hard enough. The real challenge is to learn how to be kinder to yourself afterward, and set yourself up for future success.

  • Are Activity Trackers Any Match for Slouchy Office Workers?

    Chances are, you know at least one person who's in love with her Fitbit or Fuelband, and its calorie- and step-counting assistance -- especially if you work in an office, where workers spend more time sitting than improving their health. Now, one company is offering an activity tracker that measures an additional element of fitness: good posture.

  • Could Skipping Coffee Make You More Productive?

    "Don't talk to me before I've had my coffee." In addition to being good advice from many workers, variations on that statement are probably keeping the novelty mug business afloat. There's just one problem: at least one study indicates that caffeine itself is the problem, and consuming it might actually tank productivity instead of fueling it.

  • 5-Minute Networking Tips for Busy People

    Some people love networking; others would rather get a root canal while waiting in line at the DMV. No matter where you sit on that spectrum, you probably don't have a lot of time to make the connections that sustain your career. Fortunately, some of the best techniques for building professional relationships take hardly any time at all, and they're all based on the same idea: if you want to have friends, or at least people willing to lend you a hand if you need one, you have to be a friend.

  • 3 Ways to Negotiate Your Way to a Happier Job

    Once you make enough money to pay the bills, a bigger salary won't necessarily buy you happiness. But if you can arrange your job so that you have more autonomy and purpose, and better work-life balance, you just might feel a little bit more cheerful about heading off to work in the morning.

  • The Office That Disappears When You Go Home at Night

    Remember when 9-to-5 was considered a full day of work? For many office workers, eight hours a day would now look like a part-time job. At one Amsterdam-based company, however, the standard work day might be making a comeback, thanks to an innovative design concept: their office essentially disappears at night, Brigadoon-style.

  • When You Need to Tell the Boss Something She Doesn't Want to Hear

    No one wants to be a yes man or woman, but after a couple of years of post-recession economic gloom and job instability, it's hard to feel comfortable telling the boss bad news. Unfortunately, in order to do your job well, you'll have to learn how to discuss tough topics with your manager. Here's how to do it.

  • Don't Let Your Parents Ruin Your Job Search

    Thirty-eight percent of workers between the ages of 18 and 24 have their parents involved in their job search, according to a recent survey from Adecco. Whether that's a good thing or a bad thing depends on the type of involvement -- and how visible it is to the employer.

  • The Perfect Break Is 17 Minutes Long, According to This Experiment

    Want to be more productive? Work for 52 minutes, and then take a 17-minute break, says the Draugiem Group, a social networking company that recently conducted an experiment with the time-tracking app DeskTime to determine exactly how long their most productive workers toil before taking a rest.

  • Top 5 Sober Schools by Salary Potential

    If you're more interesting in studying hard than partying hearty, you probably don't care about finding a college with a robust Greek life or lot of keggers to choose from on any given weekend. This year's College Salary Report offers a complete list of the top-earning sober schools.

  • 5 Success Tips for Introverts

    Most workplaces are pretty much nightmares for introverts. From open plan offices, to collaborative corporate cultures, to endless meetings and team projects, it's pretty clear that the modern world of work was designed with extroverts in mind. If you're introverted, making your mark at work will take a little creative thinking.

  • How to Negotiate a Better Salary When You're Underpaid

    The best time to negotiate salary is when you're considering a job offer. Even in these still-tricky economic times, you'll never have more power than before you sign on the dotted line. Sometimes, however, you work in a job for months or years, only to discover that other people with similar or lesser skill sets are getting paid more than you are. So what then?

  • Top 5 Liberal Arts Schools by Salary Potential

    Want a well-rounded education, but high earning potential when you graduate? You don't have to sacrifice a solid foundation in the liberal arts for practical concerns. Although STEM graduates routinely top the list of high-salaried grads, many of the schools on this year's College Salary Report offer plenty of options for humanities, arts, and communications majors.

  • How to Love Giving Presentations (Yes, Really!)

    In a perfect work world, we'd only have to do the things we're good at and enjoy. Introverts would be left alone to work on one-person projects, and only professional actors and PowerPoint enthusiasts would ever have to give a presentation. No surprise: we don't live in that perfect world. But that doesn't mean that every public speaking situation has to be a nightmare for you or your career.

  • The 10 Biggest Office Distractions, and How to Beat Them [infographic]
    Did you spend part of this weekend working? If so, maybe you have a time management problem -- or maybe you have a problem with other people not letting you manage your time. Either way, identifying the major obstacles standing between you and a more productive work week will free you up to spend next weekend resting (or at least, attending to the business of your personal, non-work life).
  • The 5 Highest-Earning Schools for Sports Fans

    Want to root for the home team and net a solid paycheck after graduation? These schools prove that jocks and the spectators who love them can earn an impressive salary. This year's College Salary Report picks the winners.

  • The 5 Best Party Schools by Salary Potential

    What's work-life balance look like when you're a college student? For some, it's being able to party hearty while still getting a top-rated education, and making a good salary after graduation. If you think you can balance keggers and cramming, PayScale's College Salary Report shows which four-year schools might just be for you.

  • Is There Such a Thing as a Bad LinkedIn Endorsement?

    Done well, LinkedIn endorsements highlight your strengths, build the perception of your expertise, and show prospective employers that you have connections who are enthusiastic enough about you to take a few seconds out of their day to invest in you. But that doesn't mean you need to accept every single one -- or that you should.

  • These 5 Two-Year Colleges Offer Salaries to Rival Bachelor's Degrees

    Don't have the time, funds, or inclination to get a four-year degree? Some associate's degree programs offer high salary potential for less time. Just keep in mind that choice of school matters. For the first time, this year's College Salary Report highlights the schools whose two-year degrees offer you the best shot at raking in the big bucks.

  • Introducing the 2014-2015 PayScale College Salary Report

    Future salary isn't the only measure of a top-quality college education, but in an era when student loan debt tops $1 trillion, and two-thirds of students graduate with student loan debt, identifying which schools offer a future salary advantage is an important part of the college selection process. PayScale's annual College Salary Report helps you do your homework.