• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Beyonce Can Teach You About Job Interviews
    If you've ever experienced stage fright before a job interview, you'll see the parallels between performing and interviewing for a new job. Unless you're someone who loves being the center of attention, however, you might not think of that as a positive thing. In this week's roundup, we look at why one expert takes job interview inspiration from Beyonce; plus, some insight into the "9-to-5" workday in 2015, and a love song to the to-do list.
  • LinkedIn Sent Your Friends Too Many Emails, and All You Got Was $1,500 (Maybe)
    Whether it's the canned kind or the sort that involves male enhancement products, spam is generally worthless – unless the spam in question came from LinkedIn, and arrived in your potential connections' inboxes repeatedly, with your name and without your consent. In that case, it might be worth a share of a recent $13 million settlement.
  • How to Recover From Embarrassment at Work
    Even if you're a pretty mellow person, you probably still have that cache of "ugh" moments stored in the back of your brain. Since most of us spend the bulk of our waking moments at work, it's not a surprise if a lot of them feature TPS reports and accidental CCs. No matter what it feels like, however, embarrassment isn't forever – or at least, it doesn't have to be.
  • 5 Salary Negotiation Lessons From Amy Schumer
    Unless you're a huge standup comedy nerd – the kind who can justifiably brag that you've seen everyone "before they were cool" – you probably hadn't heard of Amy Schumer as recently as five years ago. Today, Schumer's everywhere, winning an Emmy for her sketch show Inside Amy Schumer and writing and starring in Trainwreck, which was directed by Judd Apatow. Oh, and also: she just negotiated an $8 to $10 million book deal, after canceling an earlier deal for $1 million – as Vulture put it, like a boss.
  • How to Keep Your Helicopter Parents From Ruining Your Career
    Helicopter parents are usually the province of parenting blogs and editorials, not so much career blogs like ours. But, the micromanaging doesn't necessarily stop when kids are small – or even when they graduate from college and go out into the world to get a job. If your parents are the helicopter variety, you're probably kind of embarrassed and confused about how to get them to lay off and let you make your own decisions. Worse, you might find yourself without the kind of real-life skills it takes to build your career, manage your finances, and just plain survive. If this is you, don't despair. You can escape the meddling and become independent. Here's how.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: 4 Leadership Lessons From Bond Villains
    Some of the world's greatest entrepreneurs and moguls have a faint whiff of Bond villain about them. Elon Musk is in on the joke to the point where he's been known to change his Twitter avatar to a Blofeld-esque photo of him petting a cat. So it's not as strange as it seems to look to the bad guys of the Bond films for a bit of career inspiration. This week's roundup also offers tips for working from home, and advice on how to keep your secret job search, well, a secret.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 142,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Steady at 5.1 Percent
    For the second month in a row, the Employment Situation Summary came in under analysts' expectations. Prior to this morning's report from the labor department, economists polled by Reuters had predicted gains of 203,000 jobs in September. In addition, the Bureau of Labor Statistics revised last month's numbers downward to reflect 136,000 jobs added for August, instead of the 173,000 originally reported.
  • Men Nap at Work, Zone Out During Meetings More Than Women
    Unless you're a raving extrovert – or a manager who needs something to put on that annual review – you probably hate meetings. For the vast majority of office workers, they're essentially time away from the real work that makes up the bulk of our jobs. But a recent survey shows that men are more likely to respond to a boring meeting by doing something else entirely, whether it's check email, text, or play fantasy sports. Are women just super responsible, or what's going on?
  • Why Most People Quit Their Jobs
    We've all heard sad stories of people quitting jobs to get away from gruesome bosses, unreasonable work hours, or places with weird smells, but in truth, the reasons people quit are often less dramatic – and more positive – than those horror stories might lead us to believe. A recent LinkedIn survey of over 10,000 people around the world found the reasons people quit are pretty universal.
  • ADP Report: Private Sector Added 200,000 Jobs in September
    Prior to this morning's release of the ADP National Employment Report, economists predicted the addition of 194,000 jobs to private payrolls during the previous month. The actual number, 200,000 jobs, came in above expectations and August's disappointing 190,000 jobs added.
  • 5 Banned Books That Will Inspire You in Your Career
    Every year since 1982, the American Library Association joins forces with other literary-minded organizations to promote Banned Books Week, a celebration of reading and free speech. Whatever your favorite genre, you're likely to find some example of it on one of the ALA's most-challenged books lists. Also on those lists: plenty of books, classic and otherwise, that can guide, inform, and inspire you to even greater heights in your career.
  • Cover Letters Probably Don't Matter, But You Still Need One
    The job hunting process occasionally veers into the absurd, requiring job seekers to jump through hoops seemingly for no reason at all. Think of all the times you had to upload a resume into an applicant tracking system ... and then summarize your work experience on the next screen. And, how often have you sat down to write a cover letter, only to come up blank because your resume already includes everything you'd want to say? Well, good news/bad news on that last front, job seekers: a recent survey shows that your disdain for the cover-letter part of job searching is justified. The question is whether you'll ever be allowed to stop writing them.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Using Facebook for Work (Without Looking Like a Slacker)
    When is a time-waster like Facebook anything but? When it's your job. For social media managers and people in similar occupations, spending time on Facebook and Twitter isn't a distraction from their job – it is the job. The trouble starts when your job description includes social media, but lots of other duties as well; when a co-worker sees you scrolling through feeds, they're apt to think you're squandering company time. In this week's roundup, we look at some expert advice on not looking lazy when you're working hard; plus, how to get followers for your blog and how to impress prospective employers online.
  • Real Work-Life Balance Starts With Your Boss
    If you want to hear that you need to take a vacation, the U.S. Travel Association is probably the organization to ask. That said, yesterday's Upside of Downtime Forum, held in New York, organized by the USTA's Project: Time Off, and featuring speakers like Arianna Huffington and Randi Zuckerberg, offered reasons why your boss should be pushing for you to take a holiday, as well. Of course, the real question is: does your employer understand the value of time away from work – or are your official vacation days, if you're lucky enough to have them, merely a mirage?
  • The No. 1 Thing You Should Never Do on LinkedIn: Be a Creeper
    Using social media to build your professional network is both an art and a science. Learn all you can about how to optimize your profile, catch the attention of both bots and human HR folks, and introduce yourself in the right way to the right people, but in the end, there's always a hefty amount of gut feeling involved with building your brand online. Too bad, then, that sometimes our guts (or those of our potential connections) are so very, very dumb.
  • #SmartGirlsAsk Changes the Conversation on the Emmys Red Carpet
    Why should we care what journalists ask celebrities on the red carpet? Because if all girls see are women being valued for fitting into a designer dress and having access to the best professional grooming money can buy, it's just a little bit harder for them to picture themselves growing up to find a seat at the conference table. In the past year, the #AskHerMore campaign on Twitter has encouraged journalists to ask actresses about their accomplishments, not their manicures; last night, Amy Poehler's Smart Girls organization took the trend one step further with #SmartGirlsAsk.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Michael Scott Syndrome – When the Incompetent Don't Know They're Incompetent
    Everyone has had this co-worker: the person who has no clue what they're doing ... and no idea that they're not the smartest guy in the room. In the worst-case scenario, the incompetent colleague is your boss, and you spend your days alternately marveling at their delusion and cursing the day you agreed to take this job in the first place. How did they get this way, and why are the incompetent often so filled with undeserved self-confidence? This week's roundup looks at this mystery, plus how to get buy-in during a big change, and how to be happier at work, starting today.
  • 4 Working Moms Share the Reality of Maternity Leave in the US
    Last month, we asked working parents to share their experiences with taking parental leave in the US. The responses, which came from people in occupations as diverse as librarian and banker, showed what most of us already know: the United States has a long way to go when it comes to leave for new parents. While top tech employers like Netflix and Microsoft might dangle months or even a year of paid leave, most working parents are left cobbling together disability, vacation time, and FMLA leave – if they're lucky enough to qualify.
  • How to Avoid Defaulting on Your Student Loans
    Over 67 percent of college seniors had taken out student loans as of the 2011-12 academic year, according to The National Center for Education Statistics. That same year, the student loan default rate reached 10 percent. Obviously, no one enters school planning on defaulting on their student loans – defaulting can ruin your credit, impacting everything from your ability to get a mortgage or a car loan to getting hired for your dream job. PayScale's College Salary Report shows how college choice affects ability to earn enough to pay back loans; to help students avoid common mistakes when taking out their first loans, we spoke via email with Anne Del Plato, Regional Director for U-fi Student Loans.
  • How Financial Aid Affects College Cost and ROI By Household Income
    This weekend, President Obama rolled out new Department of Education initiatives aimed at increasing the number of students who attend college and graduate without unmanageable student loan debt. Among them: College Scorecard, an assessment tool that allows students and their families to choose potential colleges based on factors like average annual cost, graduation rate, and salary after attending. PayScale is using this data to add another layer to our College ROI Report, showing how income level affects college ROI.

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