• 5 Ways to Slim Down on Mindless Social Media Use in 2015
    Checking social media non-stop around the clock has probably become more of an addiction than a habit, sucking up valuable time and energy that you could be using to advance your career. Here are a few tricks for being more productive with your social media usage in the new year.
  • 5 Steps for Building Your Own Professional Website
    Whether you are a job seeker, an independent jewelry designer, a freelance journalist, an aspiring filmmaker, or the owner of a new food cart, a strong online presence is a key part of every professional and small business's marketing strategy. The backbone of this presence is your website. And unless your small business is a web design company, or you are successful enough to hire a programming whiz (in which case you would have probably already needed a website by now), you most likely have neither the funds nor skills to fork over thousands to a professional for the perfect site. Thankfully, in today's sea of freelancers, entrepreneurs, and independent contractors, a lack of money and programming knowledge does not stand in the way of a great-looking site that does not break the bank.
  • 5 Reasons to Defer Holiday Vacations
    If you worked during the holiday, instead of taking a vacation, you're not the only one. There's a growing trend among American workers toward more strategic planning of vacation opportunities -- taking advantage of every possible dollar and allotted hour to build a vacation experience that you and your family won't ever forget.
  • 5 of the Coolest Company Cafeterias
    Back in high school, the cafeteria's role as a road map for social status was limited to the seating arrangements of the people eating in it, but now it's the room itself that holds all the power. From in-house sushi chefs to onsite sustainable farms, companies around the country pull out all the stops when it comes to creating a state-of-the-art culinary haven for their workers. Here's a roundup of some of the most enviable examples.
  • Want to Get More Done at Work? Do Less
    Some good news for anyone sick of 12-hour days at the office: the key to maximizing professional productivity may not be to work more, but rather to work less. According to a recent study conducted by the Draugiem Group, a social networking company, the average person remains productive for 52 minutes at a time. Using its productivity tracking app, DeskTime, the Draugiem Group analyzed users' time and tasks and found that the most productive 10 percent were those who worked for 52-minute intervals followed by 17-minute breaks, over the course of a workday that often lasted fewer than eight hours.
  • 5 Reasons to Take Vacation for the Holiday
    'Tis the holiday season, which means that the people you know (and work with) are likely taking one of two approaches: They are either working more than ever; or they are taking lots of time off to be with their families and enjoy a well-deserved break. Here's the thing, though. More of us seem to be in the group of those who are working too hard and not having much fun. In fact, 40 percent of us don't take all of our vacation days each year.
  • Surprise: The US Is Terrible at Work-Life Balance
    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development recently released its biannual report ranking its member countries for work-life balance. Out of 34 countries, the U.S. came in 29th, beating Australia but trailing Poland. Turkey came in last, with 45 percent of workers pulling 50-hour weeks, and Denmark first, with about 2 percent doing the same. Get out your giant foam fingers and start up the chant: We're 29! We're 29!
  • 7 Tips to Take a Guilt-free Vacation From Work
    Do you feel obligated to reply to emails during your holiday, because if you don’t, things will fall through the cracks? Given the global nature of business, there's no one time when all employees around the world are out on vacation. You may not be able to completely unplug, but that doesn't meant that you can't enjoy some time with your family. Here are some tips to help you take a few days off without feeling too guilty about it.
  • How Your Job Can Help You Through a Tough Time
    We all go through difficult times once in a while. Whether it's an illness, divorce, grief, or some other struggle that's got you down, it can be really hard to face the workday when your life is pulling at your heartstrings. But, you need your job, and you recognize the importance of putting one foot in front of the other and carrying on, even though that's easier said than done. The good news is, if you approach this thoughtfully and intentionally, and if you remember to be kind to yourself along the way, your job might actually be able to help you get through this tough time.
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Better Networks, Freedom From Email Slavery, and Early Retirement
    Which stories shaped your career this week? The big headline is obviously the jobs reports. The ADP report, which is based on payroll data from private employers, showed gains of 208,000 jobs for November. The news from the Bureau of Labor Statistics was even better: non-farm payrolls added 321,000 jobs last month. For workers, this is good news -- but it's not the whole conversation. To see what else is working Americans' minds this week, we turn to some of the most popular career bloggers on the internet.
  • 3 Ways to Beat the Holiday Slump
    If you find it more difficult to get stuff done at work during the holiday season, you're not alone: according to one Accountemps survey, 34 percent of senior managers say their employees are less productive around the holidays. Blame the weather, or the fewer number of workdays, or the temptation to shop instead of work, but one thing is clear: if you want to close out the year on a high note, you're going to have to work smart as well as hard.
  • You Sit Too Much; Here's What to Do About It [infographic]
    American workers spend 21 hours a day being sedentary, and only three hours being active, according to research from Ergotron and research firm Research Now. In fact, 86 percent of respondents said that they sit "all day, every day," despite the fact that 70 percent said they hate sitting. Worst of all, more than half of those surveyed said that when they do get up, they use "getting food" as an excuse. Given that most companies aren't going to shell out for treadmill desks for everyone, is there any way to minimize the amount of sitting we're doing?
  • 4 Tiny Changes That Will Help You Work Smarter, Not Harder
    Many of us live to work, rather than work to live. According to the Department of Labor, the average American between the ages of 25-54 with children spends a whopping 8.7 hours on "working and related activities" each day, but only one hour on "eating and drinking" and two-and-half on "leisure and sports." While you're unlikely to convince the boss to let you cut your day short in favor of spending more time watching TV, you might be able to make a few small changes that boost productivity and get you out the door as soon as possible. Plus, if you take care of yourself, your time at work will be more pleasant.
  • 3 Ways Your Husband Could Be Holding You Back Professionally
    If you're in a happy, committed relationship, the last thing you want to hear is that your wonderful partner might be negatively affecting your career. For working women who are married to men, however, it's important to recognize the ways in which the marriage penalty can crop up, even for childless couples -- through no fault of your husband's.
  • To Spare Retail Workers, Some Shoppers - and Companies - Boycott Black Thursday
    For better or worse, Black Friday, the informal commercial holiday that follows the national holiday of Thanksgiving Day, has been a widely accepted fact of life for retail workers, and shoppers, for decades now. However, in the last few years, an effort by brick-and-mortar stores to compete with online retailers has led to earlier and earlier kickoffs to the official start of the holiday shopping season. Many stores now open their doors on Thanksgiving Day. This practice, along with other demands placed on retail workers by their employers during the holiday season, has serious consequences for these employees, and many are saying that enough is enough.
  • The 10 Longest Commutes in the US
    Long commutes are bad for your health, happiness, and job satisfaction. On average, Americans commute 25.5 minutes each way, but some unlucky folks travel much longer than that in order to get to and from work each day.
  • The Best Way to Stay Excited About Your Work: Take a Job You're Not Quite Qualified For
    We spend so much of our lives at work. While making money, having good benefits, and experiencing marked success are important, it might also be nice to actually be excited about the job you do. The benefits of having enthusiasm about your work, and passion for your job, are not to be underestimated, and staying challenged and stimulated by your occupation might just be the key.
  • Have a Conscientious Spouse, Get a Promotion
    Even if we have a clear and distinct separation between our personal lives and our professional ones, there is no doubt that how things are going at work can affect how we feel at home. Despite our best efforts, most of us find it difficult to not bring home the stresses, or successes, of the day. Likewise, the goings-on of our personal lives can impact our careers.
  • 5 Ways to Take Back Your Commute
    The popular wisdom is that commuting makes workers unhappy and unhealthy -- even unproductive. But knowing that a shorter commute would make your working life better isn't really helpful if you don't have the option to work closer to home. So how can you make the best of a bad situation?
  • Jobs Parents Just Don't Understand
    Many of the jobs workers are doing today didn't exist 20 years ago, or even 10 years ago. The world has been moving pretty fast, and our elders may struggle at times to keep up with all the innovation, technology, and novelty of today's work world. LinkedIn's recent survey found that one out of three parents has trouble understanding what their child does for a living, and half of them think they could be more supportive if they knew more. If your parents don't get what you do, here's how to explain it to them.