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  • Why Every Job Seeker Should Write Their Autobiography
    Thanks to social media, when most of hear "biography," we think of Twitter mini-bios – the kind that contain a bunch of one-word descriptors, punctuated by periods, and are limited to 160 characters. But according to Aliza Licht, author of Leave Your Mark: Land Your Dream Job. Kill It in Your Career. Rock Social Media, we might want to start thinking bigger, especially if we're not getting job offers.
  • The Best #DistractinglySexy Tweets

    After Nobel Prize winner Sir Tim Hunt made headlines with a long, public and shockingly sexist diatribe about why he thought women were more of a distraction than a benefit in labs, hundreds of female scientists have taken to Twitter to call him out on his comments. These female STEM workers are posting photos of themselves at work, decked out in their daily uniforms of lab coats, hazmat suits, hairnets and goggles, with the hashtag #DistractinglySexy

  • Slack's New Podcast: Stories About Work
    The Silicon Valley company, Slack, which is led by Flickr cofounder Stewart Butterfield, aims to change the way teams communicate in these here modern times. Their app, which makes work more fun (but might keep you there), is gaining popularity in workplaces, and alternative work spaces, across the county.
  • 3 Totally Painless Networking Tips for People Who Hate Networking
    Even if you're the shyest or most introverted person in the world, you're probably already networking, without even knowing it. That's because "networking" is a terrible word for a thing most of us do anyway: build relationships. The goal is to maximize what you're already doing, plus look for additional opportunities that fit with your personality and lifestyle – in other words, to network painlessly, in a way that will build your career and not drive you crazy.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Quiz – Are You Living Up to Your Full Potential?
    When we were in school, guidance counselors checked in with us to see how we were progressing. As adults, well, let's just say we could go a long time without thinking about whether we're still headed in the right direction. This week's roundup looks at a simple quiz to help workers be their own guidance counselors. Plus: how to kill collaboration, not that you'd want to, and how to work with those co-workers you wish would find another job.
  • 7 Surprising Celebrities You Didn't Know Have STEM Degrees
    You probably spend more time Googling your favorite celebs' film credits than their educational credentials, but it's time to give some recognition to celebrities with STEM degrees. The seven celebrities on this list do more than just provide us with mindless entertainment – each of the famous names listed below have earned a degree in a science, technology, engineering, or math subject.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Find Your Own Personal 'Board of Directors'
    One of the toughest parts of transitioning from being a full-time student to a working professional is the lack of framework. All of a sudden, there are no tests, no grades, no clearly defined projects with a beginning, middle, and end. Success is harder to define, and while the sky's the limit, the goal posts can seem to toward the horizon with every step you take. The good news? While your working hours belong to the company, your career belongs only to you.
  • 5 Tricky Ways to Shorten Meetings
    Meetings are a mystery. Everyone claims to hate them, and yet they proliferate on our calendars like Tribbles on Star Trek. The explanations for why that happens are many and varied, including different goals for management and staff, ineffective communication techniques, and just plain old ego. (If you've ever had a boss who loved to hear himself talk, you're familiar with this issue.) Here's how to keep meetings short and get back your time.
  • 5 Tips for Graduates From Economists
    Graduating from college is an exciting, and simultaneously scary, time in one's life. The future feels open and vast, and the opportunities seem endless yet somehow also slightly out of reach. It's a great time to look to others for advice and guidance in order to make good decisions and move toward a positive next step.
  • Early Career Success Guide: Don't Forget About the Soft Skills
    Hard skills will help you get the job, but if you want to keep it (and excel) you need soft skills as well. Knowing how to communicate effectively, rebound from a setback, and express commitment to your work will impress the boss, your co-workers, and your company's clients – all of which will make it easier to show off what you can do.
  • The 5 Worst States for Teachers
    Whether you're new to the profession, or a master veteran to the science/art, you probably know that teaching is a very difficult job. The curriculum, rules and regulations, and "best practices" are ever-changing so you can never get too comfortable. The money isn't great – to say the least. Not to mention that, on any given day, the work itself is seemingly endless, very difficult, and largely underappreciated (and/or misunderstood) by society at large.
  • What You Need to Know About Genetic Information Discrimination
    Most people have heard of discrimination based on race, sex, age, and disability. However, you may not have ever heard of genetic information discrimination unless you have been a victim of this sort of illegal employment practice or know someone who has.
  • The 5 Best States for Teachers
    Teaching is difficult work. However, some factors (such as compensation and teacher/student ratio) can make a big difference. Recently, WalletHub examined 50 states plus the District of Columbia using 18 metrics in order to determine the best and worst states for teachers.
  • Retirees Have More Education Debt Than Ever
    There's a joke going around: If you had a nickel for every time you heard someone from the older generation make fun of the younger generation, you'd have enough money to buy a house in the economy they ruined.
  • Disney Workers Laid Off and Asked to Train Foreign Replacements
    Imagine receiving notice that you'd just lost your job. It'd be devastating. But, then, just think about being asked to train your replacement over a series of months – as you discovered that the jobs had been transferred to labor imported from other countries on a temporary visa for highly skilled technical workers. Would that kind of a situation feel like some kind of new level of hell? That's just what happened to workers at Disney, who found themselves facing unemployment ... and training the workers who would soon take over their jobs.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Get Along With the Boss
    Chances are, by the time you start your first "real" job, you've had bosses before. But what was appropriate at the ice cream stand or landscaping gig might not be OK in your new office environment. Even if you've had tons of internships and lots of practice dealing with corporate culture, expect a learning curve when you begin your first professional job. Every company and manager is different. If you want to be a success, you'll need to learn how to adapt and communicate with your particular boss.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Talk to Your College Grad About Getting a Job
    What's the difference between guiding and nagging? If you're a parent, the answer probably is, "Depends on the day." There are few times more challenging to parents of grownup kids than the period after graduation, when their newly minted grads head into an unknown future (and possibly back to their childhood bedroom). The challenge, of course, from a parent's perspective, is how to encourage them in their budding career, without driving them nuts. This week, we look at Kelsey Manning's advice for parents of recent grads. Plus: tips for brand-new Twitter users, and how to answer the dreaded question, "Don't you think you're overqualified?"
  • BLS Jobs Report: 280,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.5 Percent
    This morning's Employment Situation Summary from the labor department exceeded economists' predictions and showed an increase in average hourly earnings as well. The economy added 280,000 jobs last month, more than the 225,000 predicted by economists, and the unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 5.5 percent (compared with 5.4 percent for the previous month). In addition, March and April's reports were revised upward by a combined 32,000 jobs.
  • Why 'Do What You Love' Is Bad Advice
    With just about every presidential candidate's campaign in full swing, one group we keep hearing about (and will continue to) is all of the ordinary, everyday Americans: The ones who are taking the brunt of the economic downturn, the ones who need someone to stand up for them, and the ones who need decent paying jobs to provide for their Norman Rockwell, picture-perfect American families. So what's the most popular suggestion for what these everyday Americans should do for work? DWYL – "do what you love."
  • Maybe Don't Wait for the Weekend to Apply for Jobs
    One of the challenges of looking for a job when you have a job is finding time to apply, without taking the risks of applying on the company time. For that reason, some job seekers dedicate their weekends to job searching, sending off their cover letters, CVs, and cold inquiries on Saturday and Sunday. There's just one problem: a recent study shows that by waiting until no one's in the office, you might be consigning your resume to a black hole.