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  • 6 Things to Do When You Make a Mistake at Work
    We all make mistakes. It's part of life. But, that doesn't make it any easier to recover (in the eyes of others and within yourself) when you misstep at work. We're not talking about navigating a difference of opinion here, but rather an actual error that's plain as day for all to see and know. It can be hard to move through a time or situation where you've fumbled, but it's really important to recover and handle your mistakes in a positive way. Here are some tips.
  • 4 Reasons You Don't Need a Formal Mentor
    When you're new to a field, or even just working in a new position, there's a lot to learn. It's useful to have someone to help you understand the ins and outs of the work. And, it's important to be able to get your questions answered when they pop up. A lot of people feel that there are tremendous benefits to participating in a formal mentor/mentee relationship in order to address these needs. However, there might be another way – or even a better way – to meet the same goals. Here are some reasons you might NOT need a mentor.
  • Early Career Success Guide: What If You Don't Know What to Do With Your Life?
    Only 53 percent of college graduates get a first job related to their major. Obviously, this is even less likely to be the case, if you studied for love and not for money or a clear career path. But does that mean that you're doomed to wander the job market, searching fruitlessly for a good-paying job that you'll actually enjoy?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: My Co-Worker Plans to Quit After Maternity Leave. Should I Tell?
    When we were kids, the rules of the playground were simple: don't snitch, unless you or someone else was in serious danger. As adults, it's slightly more complicated. For example, what if – like an Ask a Manager reader – you know that your colleague is planning to take paid maternity leave, and then quit? Alison Green's answer to that question, plus Dan Erwin's latest reading list, and Emmelie De La Cruz's tutorial on personal branding, in this week's roundup.
  • 5 CEOs Share the Best Advice They've Received for Career Success
    Everyone wants to be successful in life, but sometimes it can seems like the odds are against you. Fret not, because you're not alone. In fact, many of the most revered leaders admit to having to overcome adversity and defy the odds to get where they are today. Read on to see the greatest career advice from five of today's top CEOs in the business world. Spoiler alert: Hard work pays off.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Carlo Chalisea, Founder/Owner/Chef at Don Lucho's Food Truck
    Carlo Chalisea served Don Lucho's first sandwich off the grill himself in August of 2013. Now, two years later, the 30-year-old Seattle-based chef and entrepreneur is slanging his imaginative Rococo and Aji Amarillo-smothered Chicharron and Lomo Saltado creations to sandwich-loving Seattleites all over town as many as five days a week, and has trouble keeping up with demand even after hiring multiple employees. As one of the only authentic Peruvian food options in an area where the South American country’s cuisine is still largely unknown, the mobile sandwichera, which is named after Chalisea's father, has been growing apace with the local food truck scene as a whole, which exploded following the Seattle City Council’s unanimous vote to allow mobile food vendors to sell on public streets in 2011 (the state’s legalization of recreational marijuana in 2012 couldn’t have hurt things, either). At least some of the sandwich truck’s growth is the result of carving out a unique niche within the city’s larger mobile food community by way of standing gigs at local breweries, which have, like the trucks, been cropping up like wildfire in recent years. Along with this fortuitous strategy, the majority of his savings, and good old fashioned hard work, Chalisea credits Don Lucho’s success to innovative takes on his mom's family recipes, and a passionate dream to bring his Peruvian culture and cuisine to his hometown.
  • 3 Ways Living Longer Will Impact Your Career
    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median age of the American workforce is 37.1 and it is expected to increase to 42.6 by 2022. You might be dreading the fact that you'll have to work even a day longer than you have to, but that shouldn't be the case. Here are three ways a longer life expectancy will impact your career, and why you should take advantage of the extra time you have in your career and in your lifetime.
  • You Can Be a Victim of Employment Discrimination Without Even Working
    We often think of employment discrimination as being something that happens to people who already have jobs. A woman may be denied a raise because of her sex, or an older person may be forced into retirement because of his age. But employment discrimination also happens on the front end of employment, when hiring decisions are being made. So if you are looking for a job, you need to understand your rights.
  • Introducing PayScale's Guide to Early Career Success
    First jobs are important. Not only do they provide your first real glimpse of your industry from the perspective of a paid professional, but they can set the tone for your career (and salary) for years to come. Of course, career paths zigzag, and it's totally possible to bounce back from a soul-crushing first job and a lousy paycheck and move on to be a shining success – but wouldn't it be nice to skip the whole underpaid, underappreciated thing, and move on to the good stuff? PayScale's free Guide to Early Career Success offers expert advice to help you do just that.
  • College Seniors Are (Unrealistically?) Optimistic About Their Job Prospects
    It's good to be young. Seeing a wide open future sprawled out before you with plenty of awesome fruit just ripe for picking can make you feel like the possibilities are endless. As we get older, a lot of people become more pessimistic, and even bitter. Actually, Americans are pretty gloomy and doomy about the future in general these days. The optimism of our youth is a good thing. But, when it comes to the job market, is that optimism realistic?
  • 3 Ways Veep's Amy Brookheimer Is Every Working Woman's Hero
    Unconscious bias really screws things up for women in the workplace, but the battle is not over just yet. Thanks to the prevalence of more leading ladies on the big screen and on TV who play strong, successful working women, the unconscious bias isn't so unconscious anymore. We'll take a look at three ways Veep's powerhouse character, Amy Brookheimer, is showing working women everywhere that being tenacious, unapologetic, and "bossy" is nothing to be afraid of in their careers.
  • 5 Tips for Accepting College Rejections
    It can be really difficult to cope with disappointment when you have your heart set on something. For a lot of young people, the first really big letdown of life comes with being denied by their college of choice. Also, it's common for students to have a difficult time coping with the admissions process when they receive rejection letters from a number of schools. This can make it feel as though plans A-G are out, and a new vision must take shape instead, which is a trying process. All of the disappointment can be really tough to take, but there is a bright side and it's all going to be okay. Here are some tips to help you through.
  • Do Millennial Workers Really Job Hop More Often?
    There's nothing more frustrating to a manager than investing in hiring, training, and supporting a new employee, only to have him take off after a couple of months or a year. No wonder, then, that the stereotype of the job-hopping millennial inspires such derision. Who, exactly, do these whippersnappers think they are?
  • LA Votes for $15 Per Hour Minimum Wage
    It's all the rage. Seattle and San Francisco have done it, and now Los Angeles is joining the pack. Last week, the Los Angeles City Council voted to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020, becoming the largest U.S. city to do so.
  • #PayChat: How to Kick Off Your Career
    Are you a recent graduate trying to get your foot in the door or a student trying to figure out what you want to do with your life? Landing your first job can be challenging, nerve-wracking, stressful, and unsettling without any proper guidance. PayScale is here to help you start your career off on the right foot.
  • 89 Percent of Minimum Wage Workers are Over 20 Years Old
    Historically, Americans who didn't attend college (or even those that didn't complete high school) had an abundant job market available to them. Working as farmers or factory workers, unskilled laborers still made less than skilled workers, but they were able to make a decent living and, during many times in history, actually secure a middle-class lifestyle for their families.
  • 3 Things You Need to Know Before You Negotiate Salary
    In a perfect world, you'd never have to learn how to negotiate salary. Companies would pay a fair market rate, and give reasonable cost-of-living and appropriate merit increases every year. In reality, well, things are a bit more complicated. Getting the salary you deserve takes research, courage, and a little bit of finesse – but most of all, it takes preparation. Here's what you need to figure out before you sit down to the negotiating table.
  • 3 Ways to Tell That Your Boss Doesn't Want You to Take Vacation
    Why wouldn't you take all your vacation time? Maybe because you're afraid you're not supposed to. Managers don't always say what they mean, especially when it comes to things like taking time off. The party line might be that taking PTO is encouraged and supported ... but do you sense a little hesitation, maybe even a little judgment when people do take their holiday time? If you're having trouble figuring out whether your boss really wants you to take that summer vacation, there are a few ways to figure it out.
  • 7 Tips for Working Outdoors
    The sweet, sunny days of early summer make you want to be outside: go to the beach, work in your garden, do anything that involves fresh air and being away from your desk. There's no month like May for tempting us to be outside as often as we can. You may even feel the urge to do usually indoorsy things outside if you can swing it – like your work. And, why not? Here are some tips for working outdoors.
  • The 5 Best Cities to Start Your Career
    There are many important factors to consider when deciding where to start one's career. Recent college grads, for example, might want to live close to family or friends, or in an area or region that they are particularly fond of for one reason or another. It's important to like where you live, but it's also important to consider economic/job market factors before making a final decision.