• 3 Signs That You're Getting Fired
    Sometimes, you can just feel the tension in the air. Something is wrong, you don't know what, but it is making everybody uncomfortable. Then you get fired, and feel blindsided. Often, the signs that you were about to be let go were there all along.
  • Is the Skills Gap a Myth?

    In a recent Manpower survey, 40 percent of employers said they had trouble finding qualified applicants for open jobs. On the other hand, David Nicklaus at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch points out, we have a 6.2 percent unemployment rate -- better than the recession, obviously, but still "too high in the sixth year of an economic recovery." How can we account for the simultaneous existence of a high unemployment rate and employers who say they can't find workers qualified for jobs?

  • Continuing the Sandwich Wage Theft Trend
    Red Eye, a Chicago news weekly, reports that yet another fast food submarine sandwich chain franchise has been accused of cheating its workers out of the wages to which they are entitled. This time, the center of the allegations is a Jimmy John’s franchise.
  • 5 Things That Make a Psychologically Healthy Workplace
    If you have ever torn your hair out wondering if you are going crazy at work, it is just possible that you're OK, and the workplace is to blame. The American Psychological Association recognizes that psychologically healthy workplaces are most likely to increase your motivation, your confidence, and your job performance. There are five general areas in which employers may pass or fail the psychologically healthy workplace "test."
  • Here's Why Robots Might Not Take Our Jobs

    Robots have been taking jobs from humans for decades now, replacing bank tellers with ATMs, cashiers with self-checkout machines, and factory workers with mechanized assembly lines. The fear, of course, is that the bots will grow so intelligent -- and low-maintenance from a management perspective -- that they'll replace us altogether. In a recent New York Times column, Neil Irwin explains why that might not be as likely as some naysayers predict. Why? For one thing, robots don't have a lot of common sense.

  • What's the Difference Between Good Stress and Bad Stress?

    Chronic stress is bad for you, potentially affecting everything from your physical health to your productivity at work. But a little stress, now and then, can actually make you better at your job and happier both at home and at the office.

  • Is Facebook Really Better Than LinkedIn for Job Seekers?
    Most people who utilize social media to look for a new job immediately turn to LinkedIn, which has developed a reputation for being the largest professional social network. It’s the go-to destination to connect with recruiters, stay in touch with people you meet at networking events, and discover new opportunities. However, as Facebook is actually the largest social network, period, could it be that Facebook is the better place to look for a new job?
  • How to Bring Positivity to the Workplace
    Positive psychology is the study of types of behavior that seem to create a positive atmosphere. When you create a positive atmosphere at work, you feel better and are more productive. Here is how and why.
  • 5 Jobs for People Who Love Travel

    Most workers who travel as part of their jobs get to see the insides of identical conference centers from sea to shining sea. It's exciting if you like single-serving coffee or collect hotel soaps, and less exciting if your true love is travel -- the real kind, where you get to immerse yourself in a culture, however briefly, and see the world from a whole new perspective. If that's your idea of the perfect gig, these jobs might be a good fit for you.

  • 3 Management Practices That Improve Employee Productivity

    Most productivity advice focuses on individuals, offering tips on time management techniques, systems, and technology that can help us get out of our own way. That's all well and good, but if the boss isn't on board, the world's best to-do list won't be much help. If you're the boss, you're in a unique position to help your team stuff done. Here's how to do it.

  • How to Survive an Overly Critical Boss
    Lots of criticism and no compliments can knock the wind out of your sails. When criticism feels unfair, it is even more demoralizing. Knowing how to discuss your boss's criticisms may be the difference between an angry blow-out and an improved working relationship.
  • Workers Less Loyal to Employers -- Even If They Get Raises

    Are you loyal to your employer? If so, you're a dying breed. A Randstad study of Canadian workers found that although half of respondents said they had "the perfect job," 65 percent would leave if doing so netted them a higher salary or offered better career opportunities. Experts say that workers feel less loyalty to their employers even if they offer more money.

  • Low Stress, High Pay? These 3 Low-Pressure Jobs Can Pay $70k or More per Year

    It's common to think of stress and pay as a tradeoff. For example, surgeons and air traffic controllers pull down the big bucks because their work is not only beneficial to society, but potentially tough on the cortisol levels of the job-holder. We don't care how good you are at managing stress: if your job involves rebuilding the human body or landing several tons of steel and jet fuel, you're going to feel the pressure. But not every high-paying gig demands such sacrifices.

  • 7 Ways to Facilitate Change at Work

    Most people aren't crazy about change, especially at work. If you like how your company does things, any alteration seems like a potential for disaster; if you don't, well, any situation can always get worse. Add in the unstable economic environment of the past couple of years, and it's no wonder that managers struggle to convince their reports to give change a chance.

  • Kindness Gets You Far in the Workplace
    Ellen DeGeneres appeals to a simple truth when she says, "Always be kind to one another." She doesn't say "at home," she doesn't say, "just when you are at school," and she doesn't say "except when you are at work." It turns out that science is in agreement with Ms. DeGeneres.
  • The Impossible Dream: How You Can Return From Vacation to an Empty Inbox
    Taking a vacation is supposed to mean taking a break from work. It’s the reason why email auto-responders exist; so you can enjoy a Mai Tai on the beach with your toes in the sand without worrying about what “emergency” is happening in the office. Of course, many of us just can’t resist the impulse to check email while we're away. Messages pile up, making that first day back at the office just short of a nightmare.
  • Here's What Is Stressing Out Americans

    Sometimes, it's the little things that get you. A recent survey from NPR, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that while health problems and work upheaval are the biggest causes of stress for most people on a long-term basis, daily stressors like juggling family schedules and commuting to work also have an effect on our perception of stress and its impact on our lives.

  • How to Become a Leader at Work
    Successful workplace leadership comes from strong and steady transformation of the group as a whole. View your job not as one cog in the wheel, but as part of a holistic department or company. This shift in perception might help you battle the single biggest thing standing between you and becoming a good leader: fear.
  • PayScale at SXSW: Vote to Find Out How to Get the Career of Your Dreams

    Over the past few years, South by Southwest has grown from a music festival into a multi-disciplinary cultural event. Whatever you're interested in -- film, education, the environment, or emerging technologies -- you can bet there's an upcoming panel devoted to innovations that will change that field. This year, PayScale has two panels up for consideration, both focusing on how education and training can help you get the job you want and money you deserve.

  • Are Unpaid Internships Slave Labor?
    The rising tide of lawsuits filed by unpaid interns for violations of labor laws are evidence that some businesses consider interns to be exploitable, free labor. There are reasons that interns are traditionally unpaid, but it may be time for this to change.