• The 10 Longest Commutes in the US
    Long commutes are bad for your health, happiness, and job satisfaction. On average, Americans commute 25.5 minutes each way, but some unlucky folks travel much longer than that in order to get to and from work each day.
  • The Best Way to Stay Excited About Your Work: Take a Job You're Not Quite Qualified For
    We spend so much of our lives at work. While making money, having good benefits, and experiencing marked success are important, it might also be nice to actually be excited about the job you do. The benefits of having enthusiasm about your work, and passion for your job, are not to be underestimated, and staying challenged and stimulated by your occupation might just be the key.
  • Have a Conscientious Spouse, Get a Promotion
    Even if we have a clear and distinct separation between our personal lives and our professional ones, there is no doubt that how things are going at work can affect how we feel at home. Despite our best efforts, most of us find it difficult to not bring home the stresses, or successes, of the day. Likewise, the goings-on of our personal lives can impact our careers.
  • 5 Ways to Take Back Your Commute
    The popular wisdom is that commuting makes workers unhappy and unhealthy -- even unproductive. But knowing that a shorter commute would make your working life better isn't really helpful if you don't have the option to work closer to home. So how can you make the best of a bad situation?
  • Jobs Parents Just Don't Understand
    Many of the jobs workers are doing today didn't exist 20 years ago, or even 10 years ago. The world has been moving pretty fast, and our elders may struggle at times to keep up with all the innovation, technology, and novelty of today's work world. LinkedIn's recent survey found that one out of three parents has trouble understanding what their child does for a living, and half of them think they could be more supportive if they knew more. If your parents don't get what you do, here's how to explain it to them.
  • 3 Ways to Wake Up on Time (Even if You're Not a Morning Person)
    It's important to start your work day on the right foot. It can be very hard to feel strong, positive, and energized in the morning when you already feel like you're running behind. Getting to work on time can be a real struggle for some. So, if you're not a morning person, or if you find yourself arriving a little late from time to time, it might be a good idea to look into some new strategies for getting yourself up and out of the door in the morning.
  • 10 Signs You're Facing Job Burnout
    Did you drag yourself into the office today? Maybe it's just the normal Monday morning gear-shift -- or maybe it's a sign of a bigger problem. If it's getting harder and harder to go to work, and you're getting less done while you're there, it's time to consider whether you're dealing with job burnout, and not just normal day-to-day stress.
  • 3 Tips for Work-Life Balance on the Weekend
    Want to get more out of your few precious hours off each weekend? It starts with planning ahead. Spend a few minutes strategizing now, and next weekend, you can be far away from your computer, doing anything but thinking about work.
  • Moms Stay Home When Kids Are Sick
    Why do women still make less money than men? It's not all about overt prejudice on the behalf of employers. PayScale's data show that part of the issue is that women tend to gravitate toward careers that give back -- and pay less. While socially conditioned altruism might be part of the reason for that choice, another factor also influences women's career decisions: the need for a flexible schedule. Recent research shows that women are 10 times more likely than men to stay home with sick kids.
  • Many Americans Would Improve Their Career Before Health or Relationships [Infographic]
    A new survey from Huffington Post reveals some surprising results about what makes Americans happy. Namely, nearly one-third of those surveyed would choose to improve their career or finances over their health or their relationships.
  • Do Not Call In Sick Using These 7 Ridiculous Excuses
    It's hard to get time off. Over the past 20 years, access to paid vacation days has declined, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, while more employers are offering sick time and other personal leave. This means that the temptation to take the occasional "mental health" day is stronger than ever before. Just remember, before you do, that lying has a way of coming back to haunt you in the end.
  • 5 Ways to Make the Most of Your Lunch Break
    Some days, you’re too busy to eat lunch, and even when you do get a chance to eat, you don't always get a break to do it in. If you generally wind up eating at your desk, sandwich in one hand while you type emails with the other, it's time to change your ways. Reserve a little time for a real lunch, and you'll be healthier, happier, and more productive.
  • Surprise: It’s Really Not Great to Be a Perfectionist
    Everyone is different, but most perfectionists tend to have three things in common with their fellow sufferers. First, they don’t recognize that being a perfectionist isn’t a good thing. Second, perfectionists don’t think they’re perfectionists. Finally, perfectionists generally find it almost impossible to give themselves a break -- and that's where things get dicey, both for their careers and for their personal lives.
  • 3 Ways Eastern Mindfulness Practices Can Help You, the Non-Practicing American Worker
    The popularity of yoga, meditation, and other mindfulness practices has increased significantly in the United States in recent decades. Many businesses have even started to consider how these practices can improve workers’ productivity and help them manage stress. In fact, adopting some of these techniques could improve your job performance and work-life balance, even if you don't plan to become a dedicated yogi or meditator.
  • 5 Ways to End Your Workweek on a High Note
    What do you do at work on Friday afternoons? Mobile devices and online access to the tools we use to do our jobs have made it harder to hide out under our desks and wait for the factory whistle to blow. Still, after a long, hard week, it's easy to let burnout overwhelm you. Don't just coast through the last minutes and hours of your workweek. Use your time wisely, and you'll have a more pleasant weekend, and start next week off fresh and ready to work.
  • 5 Downsides to Working for a Startup
    These days, it seems like everyone is working for a startup -- and if you aren’t, you likely know someone who is. Working for a new company with ample funding has its benefits, but it’s not always rainbows and sunshine. Here are five reasons working for a startup isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.
  • Just Got Into Work? Don't Open Your Email
    Many of us start our day by checking our work email, sometimes on our smartphones before we even get out of bed. The siren song of a teeming inbox is even harder to resist when we get to the office. After all, you can't just start your work day by ignoring your email -- can you?
  • Work Friendships Are Not Necessarily Real Friendships
    Work friendships are good to have, but they are different from and do not take the place of real friendships. Recognize the difference between the two and enjoy the benefits of each, but avoid making the mistake of relying on work friends for real, personal companionship and confidence.
  • Pre-cation: The Best Job Perk You Don't Have

    Most workers don't get much time off between jobs. If you're leaving one job for another, you're unlikely to be able to coordinate a reasonable start date and sufficient notice to keep from burning bridges at your old employer; if you've been unemployed, well, taking more time off without pay might be impossible. But what if you could get a vacation, paid, before you started work?

  • Are Activity Trackers Any Match for Slouchy Office Workers?

    Chances are, you know at least one person who's in love with her Fitbit or Fuelband, and its calorie- and step-counting assistance -- especially if you work in an office, where workers spend more time sitting than improving their health. Now, one company is offering an activity tracker that measures an additional element of fitness: good posture.

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