• Early Jobs of Presidential Candidates: Exotic Bird Cage Assembler, Babysitter, and More
    Barack Obama once scooped ice cream at Baskin-Robbins. Gerald Ford was a "darned good" park ranger, in the words of his former supervisor. Ronald Reagan was an actor, and before that, a lifeguard who saved 77 lives over the course of seven summers. Early jobs teach us a lot, from work ethic and perseverance to budgeting and the value of education. Take a look at PayScale's Presidential First Jobs Report, and you'll see how the current crop of presidential candidates' early jobs prepared them for a run at the White House.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Update Your LinkedIn Profile (Without Tipping Off the Boss)
    Keeping a job search secret is more complicated these days than not getting busted looking at a job search site on the company time. Part of the problem is that personal brand is so important for job seekers; to show hiring managers and recruiters what you have to offer, you have to keep on top of your social media presence. Of course, nothing tells an employer that you're looking like a freshly updated LinkedIn. So how can you keep your profiles fresh, without making things awkward with your current boss? This week's roundup looks at ways to manage that, plus how to handle rejection during a job search and how to deal with arguably the worst thing about working as a team.
  • Is Work-Life Balance Possible for Educators?
    Whether we're talking about elementary school teachers or professors at the university level, many educators are struggling to find work-life balance. There are some specific ways in which these jobs lend themselves to a kind of all-in approach that leaves one's personal life in the dust. Let's take a look at a few of the reasons why so many educators aren't finding their way to better work-life balance and think about potential solutions.
  • Here's Why Your Employer Should Be Promoting More Women
    A new study released by the Peterson Institute for International Economics and EY, the audit firm formerly known as Ernst & Young, shined an interesting light on the diversity problem in modern companies. First, they found a lack of women in the top seats at companies. Second, they found where that where women had been hired or promoted to top management roles, profits rose.
  • 'Presenteeism' Is Not Your Fault: Why Workers Come to Work Sick
    "If you're sick, stay home." You've heard that from experts ranging from the CDC, to WebMD, to your own mother. If you're lucky, you might even hear it from your boss. Still, many come to work sick, including over half of food service workers. The phenomenon is called "presenteeism," and researchers estimate that it costs employers $150 billion a year – more than either absenteeism or disability. So why do people go to work when they're sick? The reason why is pretty obvious: American workers feel they can't take time off, and a lot of the time, they're right.
  • Does Your Boss Pass the Teacher Test?
    A boss can make or break a job. An excellent leader inspires the entire team toward a shared vision, listens, and builds trust. A not-so-great boss, on the other hand, is the number one reason people quit their jobs.
  • 6 Tips for Making Your Co-Workers Like You More
    It's really nice to have friends at work. We spend so much time at the office, it's helpful to have some folks to pal around with while we're there. Plus, we often have a lot in common with the people at work; even if the similarities only boil down to sharing the experience of the job itself. It can be helpful to talk to co-workers about what's going on around the office or even in the industry. Often the people in our personal lives don't really understand, or they're not as interested as co-workers might be.
  • IT, Healthcare the Top Fields for Telecommuting Jobs, According to FlexJobs
    If you want to work from home, you might have an easier time finding a telecommuting gig if you're in healthcare or computer/IT. Those two industries dominated FlexJobs' list, The Top 100 Companies With Work-From-Home Jobs, which ranks the companies that offered the most work-from-home opportunities on the site in the past year. Forty percent of the companies included were in one of those two fields.
  • 4 Ways You Might Get Tricked at Your Next Job Interview
    Feeling nervous before a big job interview? You're not alone. According to a survey conducted by Harris Interactive, 92 percent of survey respondents were anxious about some aspect of a job interview. Among the top reasons: being too nervous, and not being able to answer a specific question. We all know tricky interview questions are coming our way — but what if there's more to it than that? Not to fan the flames of your anxiety, but it's not out of the realm of possibility that your interviewer will be testing you with more than just the standard curveball questions.
  • Having a Bad Day? Here Are 3 Ways to Help You Cope
    It only takes one bad day to derail you for the entire workweek, and unfortunately, they seem to crop up at the most inopportune times, like when you have a million project deadlines and other stressful things going on. If you happen to be having "one of those days," then here are some ways you can change things around and make today a positive and productive one.
  • The Yelp Open Letter Makes Me Glad Social Media Arrived After I No Longer Knew Everything
    In 2000, I worked for a startup. The name doesn't matter – like most startups, it didn't make it. The important thing, for the purposes of our story, is that I was a recent grad, awe-inspiringly entitled, fairly poor, and perhaps not very good at my job yet. The only thing I had going for me was that there was no social media, so there was no way for me to ruin my reputation with more than, say, three people. In this, I was much more fortunate than Talia Jane, the recently terminated Yelp/Eat24 employee. Jane's open letter to her CEO, which she published on Medium a few days ago, ignited the kind of internet firestorm that's generally reserved these days for arguing about Bernie Bros or Donald Trump. The question, of course, is what to make of her letter and its aftermath. Is she an entitled whippersnapper who doesn't know how to sacrifice, or a voice of her generation pointing out systemic unfairness ... and getting punished for it?
  • Ask a Recruiter: The Top 6 Salary Negotiation Mistakes

    Getting a job offer is exciting, but the subsequent salary negotiation that takes place before you sign on can be nerve-wracking. Wouldn't it be nice to find out what's going through the recruiter's head during this process? Well, welcome to PayScale's newest blog series, "Ask a Recruiter." In this inaugural edition, Caitlin Williams, a member of PayScale's own Talent Acquisition team, shares the biggest mistakes she sees time after time in salary negotiations.

    Salary negotiation is a normal step in every job offer process. Not negotiating means leaving money on the table, but negotiating poorly can be just as dangerous. Not to give away the recruiter "secret sauce," but before you accept that new job offer, make sure to avoid these top salary negotiation mistakes. Trust me, I've seen them all!

  • Liars of Reddit Share Their Greatest Resume Achievements
    When it comes to creating resumes, honesty is the best policy. But sometimes, the prospect of a brand-new, shiny job can convince even the most honest person to add a little bit of puffery to their resume. Based on these tales from Redditors who admit to lying on their resumes, we can see that this type of strategy can have a number of different and surprising outcomes.
  • 3 Ways Job-Hopping Might Mean Leaving Money on the Table
    A big incentive for jumping from one job to the next, in a relatively short space of time, is that it makes it feasible to climb up the income ladder. Every time you are offered a new job, it's an opportunity to brush up your salary negotiation skills and seek out better compensation. That said, there might be some ways that job-hopping can hurt your earning power or net worth.
  • 4 Signs That the Job Market Really Is Improving
    The road back from the Great Recession has been a long and winding one, that's for sure. Even when some economic indicators have given us hope, other factors (often the ones that matter most to workers) have lagged behind. For example, despite lower unemployment rates, wage growth has been slow. However, now that the first quarter of 2016 is well underway, there are some indications that the job market might truly be improving. Here's what you need to know.
  • Roger Goodell Makes a Lot More Money Than NFL Players, and Here's Why You Should Care
    NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell took a pay cut last year. Before you feel too bad for him, however, keep in mind that even after a $1 million cut, Goodell made $34.1 million over the 2014-5 season – more than every football player in the league, save Atlanta Falcons QB Matt Ryan, whose signing bonus brought his pay up to $36.5 million. Why are we even paying attention to millionaires, when the average American worker would be happy to score more than a 3 percent annual raise? Well, the commish-to-player pay ratio reminds us that the guys at the top of the corporate ladder often far out-earn the people whose work keeps them there. In short, it's not just that the CEO makes more than you do; it's that the CEO makes a lot more than you do.
  • 4 Things to Do If You Hate Your Job But Can't Quit Just Yet
    Raise your hand if you hate your job and can't do anything about it right now? If you raised your hand, you're not alone. In fact, according to Gallup, only about 30 percent of workers describe themselves as being engaged at work on any given day. Plus, the numbers aren't much better for managers, with only around 35 percent reporting engagement at work, so your boss's enthusiasm for the job might also be a factor. Knowing that information isn't going to make your situation any better, but these four tips just might. Read on, because there is hope for you.
  • #MondayMotivation: 5 Ways to Fool Yourself Into Getting Stuff Done
    Maybe you hop out of bed on Monday mornings with a song in your heart and a to-do list already coalescing in your brain. If so, don't be hurt if your co-workers avoid you until they've had their second cup of coffee. For many of us, the transition back into the work week is rough, to say the least. Whether the weekend was full of chores or fun, switching back to office mode is a challenge. Sometimes, the only answer is to play little tricks on ourselves, in order to make work happen.
  • Should You Tell Your Friends and Family How Much You Make?
    Discussing money might be the only real conversational taboo left in America. We've recognized, over time, that sharing our ideas and even our fears with trusted friends and family only builds our understanding and makes our lives better. These days, it's okay to talk about the troubles we're having with our children or even our marriages. We can talk about race, religion, identity, etc., outside of work. But, do we talk with each other about our salaries? Oh goodness, absolutely not. That's way too personal, and it's a conversation fraught with danger. But, what if this is a mistake? There may be some real upsides to loosening up our conversations about money.
  • Millennials: Thinking About Quitting Your Job? You're Not Alone.
    When you hear about a lot of people all leaving the same company, you may tend to think that there's something wrong with the organization. But what does it mean when people from the same generation are all planning to leave their jobs? Well, that's what is happening with Millennials. In fact, a recent survey revealed that two out of three Millennial workers plan to quit their current jobs by 2020 — which is now less than four years away. There may be some signs it's time for you to consider leaving, too.

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