• 3 Strange Jobs Held by Authors Before They Were Famous

    Even history's most revered writers had to do something to hold body and soul together before they hit it big. No surprise that these creative minds often toiled in something a little more offbeat than the usual food service or babysitting gigs.

  • 5 Management Tips: How to Encourage a Better Attitude in Your Reports

    There's a difference between constructive criticism and, well, whining. If your team is doing more of the latter these days, you don't have to stand by and let negativity take over. There are steps you can take to make sure that you still hear feedback but don't encourage aimless complaining.

  • 15 Things Working Moms Who Breastfeed Have to Think About (and 4 Tips to Make It Easier)
    Returning to work post-baby poses more problems than a newbie mother might anticipate, especially if she chooses to continue breastfeeding. Here are some tips to help pumping at work not be such a dump.
  • Are You 'Abrasive'? Why It Matters That Bosses Describe Men and Women Differently

    Let's say you have before you two performance reviews. Both are for high performers, and both contain critical as well as positive feedback. One describes the reviewed as "aggressive"; the other as "abrasive." Which review belongs to a man, and which to a woman?

  • 40 Percent of Workers Don't Take All Their Vacation

    According to a recent report from the U.S. Travel Association, 96 percent of workers see the value in taking time off -- but only 60 percent of us actually use up all our vacation time. The rest of us let paid days off expire, unused. Why aren't we using our earned time?

  • How to be a Happy and Successful Entrepreneur

    Starting your own company can be one of the most terrifying things you will ever do. The buck will always stop with you, and with that freedom comes incredible stress. The strain may cause havoc with your health. A vital part of being a successful entrepreneur is to have the right mindset.

  • Are We Ready for a World Without Resumes?

    Updating resumes and writing cover letters can feel like an insurmountable obstacle in the job hunting process, even when you're desperate for a new gig. For one thing, it's hard to see typos or inconsistencies once they've been introduced, making the process dull at best and frustrating at worst; for another, well, it feels weird to pitch yourself so openly. Wouldn't it be great if we didn't have to deal with resumes and cover letters at all?

  • How to Look for a Job When You Have a Job

    The best time to look for a new job might be when you're already employed, but that doesn't mean it's easy to manage the process when you already have a full plate. Here's how to find a new gig without getting fired from your old one.

  • Negotiate for These 10 Things When There's No More Money

    Ask anyone what they want in a new job, and money is sure to be at the top of the list. Most negotiating advice is geared toward that, offering tips on dealing with the question of salary history, figuring out how much you're worth, and asking for more than an initial low-ball offer. But what do you do when there's no more wiggle room, but you still want the job?

  • Avoid These 8 Resume Fails [infographic]

    Recruiters spend an average of six seconds looking at your resume. Sadly, this seems to be long enough to catch even the tiniest typo, but not long enough to unearth the relevant experience you modestly placed in paragraph two.

  • Food Lion Accused of Religious Discrimination
    The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that Food Lion, a supermarket chain, stands accused of workplace discrimination based on religion. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) filed a discrimination lawsuit against the chain claiming that it fired a Jehovah's Witness because the worker requested days off due to his religious beliefs. In the suit, the EEOC is seeking back pay, compensatory damages, and punitive damages.
  • 5 Ways to Boost Employee Loyalty

    Let's get one thing straight right off the bat: smart employees aren't loyal to their employers anymore. If the past few years have taught us anything, it's that there's no such thing as job security. But there are ways for you, as a manager, to improve your reports' commitment to the organization. Here's how to do it.

  • How to Develop a Good Leadership Mindset

    A huge part of being an effective leader is having the right mindset. Good leaders don't think they are better than everybody else; rather, they recognize that each and every one of us has our own skills and weaknesses. A good leader wants to encourage workers to use their skills and to improve on their weaknesses. But it's more complicated than just that.

  • Didn't Sleep? Here Are 7 Ways to Get Through Your Work Day

    Americans seem to pride themselves on sleep deprivation, functioning on little or no sleep for days on end, and still (somehow) making it to work -- but that doesn't mean that it's healthy, or good for your career.

  • Protect Yourself From Bullies at Work
    Bullies aren't just a grade-school phenomenon; you'll find bullies and bullying behavior in offices and workplaces, long after you've reached adulthood. If you are stuck working with a bully, there are ways to mitigate the damage and protect yourself.
  • Job Relocation Checklist: Do These 5 Things Before You Move

    The hardest part of moving for work is deciding to take the plunge. Once that's out of the way, you're dealing with details. Of course, how you handle the little things that go into your relocation can make a big difference to your quality of life in your new home and at your new job.

  • 5 Ways to Change Careers Without Starting From Scratch

    When we talk about career changes, we often speak in leaps, e.g. lawyers who become history teachers or executives who leave big business to start their own mom-and-pop shops. But what about the smaller career evolutions, the kind that don't require a lot of extra education or training to effect? Here's how to make a career change that's a lot easier and less frightening than jumping into a strange new occupation.

  • What to Look for in an Internship (and 3 Red Flags)
    One argument in the growing debate about whether interns should be paid is that too many companies benefit from the free labor of interns. This goes against the grain of what an internship experience was originally designed to be: an important part of the intern's education. One way to address this is to examine the quality of the internship. Here is what to look for and what to avoid.
  • 3 Common Pitfalls of Work Friendships

    The benefits of work friendships are pretty clear -- a sense of belonging, a positive corporate culture, improved communication and commitment to the team -- but that doesn't mean that having friends at work is totally without risk. Here's how things can go wrong, and what to do to make them right.

  • How to Run Your Meetings Like Google
    Meetings are the last thing anyone wants to see on their calendar. They slow down productivity and can interfere with trying to tie up loose ends on projects. Some days, it seems like meetings will never end, and for some people, they don’t. In fact, it’s not uncommon for professionals to be forced to set aside actual work until they get home in the evenings because their days are clogged with meetings. So what's the solution?