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  • What You Need to Know About the Gender Pay Gap
    There is a seemingly constant debate over the "wage gap" in the United States -- whether it exists, why it exists, how large it is, if it does exist. The wage gap represents the average difference in wages paid to men versus wages paid to women. You may have heard the (sometimes disputed) assertion that in the United States, women are only paid 77 cents for every dollar men are paid. The question is, how can this be true when wage discrimination is illegal, and has been for decades? Here we will provide you with a few facts about this debate so that you can draw your own conclusions.
  • How to Make Useful Decisions About Everyday Work Problems
    We all have to make tough decisions sometimes. Depending upon your role and level in your organization, you may be faced with difficult choices regarding hiring and firing other people, or setting budgets, or crafting policies that affect everyone's experience at work. Often enough, somebody affected by your decisions won't like them. The solution? Learn when to focus on utilitarian decision-making, and you'll be able to make better choices.
  • 3 Tips for Meeting With a Career Coach
    At any point in your career, meeting with a career coach could be beneficial. But, most people hire one when their professional lives reach a critical juncture. When you are changing positions, working toward different goals, making a geographic change, or switching industries or professional direction, a career coach can provide valuable insights and strategies that help you get where you'd like to be.
  • Are Male Leaders Less Depressed Than Female Leaders?
    A recent study from the University of Texas at Austin asked participants about their level of job authority, (their power to hire, terminate, and influence pay) and symptoms of depression. The data revealed big differences between male and female leaders.
  • 8 Things to Do When Your Peer Becomes Your Manager
    You may have worked on the same team together as peers, been classmates in school, and come up for promotion at the same time. But only one of you made the cut this time, and it was not you who was promoted. Now your peer is your manager, and as much as you resent it, there's little you can do but accept her in her new role. Assuming you’re not in a rush to head out the door, here are a few ways you can handle the transition.
  • Where Are Young College Grads Living? It's Not Where You Think
    Younger workers often flock to urban centers, trading the lower housing costs of the suburbs for the excitement (and easier commutes) of city life. But, which cities millennial workers are choosing may surprise you.
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Hilarious Holiday Tantrums and December Job Searching
    The holidays are a challenging time to be a working person. Half the people you need to talk to seem to be on vacation, or at least mentally checked out, your office is filling up with sugary treats you don't want, but can't stop eating, and the nonstop social whirl seems to bring out the worst in your co-workers. Fortunately, some of PayScale's favorite bloggers and writers have tips on staying healthy and sane during the season -- while maintaining your sense of humor, to boot.
  • Job Outlook for 2015: Best and Worst Cities for Growth
    For several years now, the unemployment rate has been improving. While this is encouraging, progress has definitely been patchy. Some areas have recovered more quickly from the economic recession than others, just as some industries have endured more of a hit and are slower to bounce back. This week, Manpower Group released the results of their employment outlook survey, forecasting job trends for the first quarter of 2015 based upon a survey of 18,000 U.S. employers in 100 metropolitan areas.
  • Once Again: It's a Bad Idea to Talk About Sensitive Subjects at Work
    How is your workplace similar to your aunt's house during a holiday celebration? Both are bad places to talk about politics, religion, or anything that's liable to get people riled up. Of course, knowing better doesn't necessarily mean doing better.
  • What Code Should You Learn? [infographic]
    Learn to code. It's the advice of career experts everywhere, from high school guidance counselors to mid-career job coaches. But with literally hundreds of languages to choose from, you might find yourself a bit lost as to which language to focus on first -- especially if the goal isn't to become a computer programmer, but rather to boost your career in your current (non-programming) field.
  • Congress Considers Drastic Cuts to Pension Plans
    For the first time ever, Congress may move to cut pension benefits to current retirees. Proposed legislation, which would take the form of an amendment to a $1.1 trillion spending bill, would cut benefits for multiemployer plans, common in the grocery, trucking, and construction industries, and often managed jointly by employers and unions.
  • 5 Job Search Tips for Pregnant Job Seekers
    Pregnant and unemployed. The words alone may make you want to cringe. After all, being either pregnant or unemployed could represent a stressful situation in your life. Taken together, it's just a bit scary. All the "normal" concerns of being jobless instantly become intensified when you're looking for a job while also preparing for the delivery of your baby. Just because it's more complicated doesn't mean that it's impossible to find a job that's perfect for you.
  • The Art of the (E-mail) Close
    Signing off as "Salty" instead of "Sally." Including 18 line items in your signature block, including your parents' home number. Forgetting that you already pushed "send" on your daily e-mail to your mom, and closing the subsequent e-mail to your boss with, "Love, Sean XOXO." Realizing that upon sending said e-mail to your boss, you accidentally hit "reply all" and thus also sent your hugs and kisses to your entire team. The ways we can bungle a professional e-mail are endless and there is arguably no worse way than how we sign off.
  • Put 2 Narcissists Together to Boost Group Creativity
    It may seem counterintuitive to build teams that include multiple people with narcissistic personality traits; these folks tend to want to be the center of attention and in charge. However, if you want to spur creative thinking and problem-solving in the workplace, this is exactly what you should do.
  • 7 Tips to Deal With a Boss Who Yells
    Although they are diminishing in number, there still are managers whose first reaction to stressful situations is to yell. Sometimes, it's the people you'd least expect: something about pressure brings out the worst in them, and they react by chewing everyone out. Of course, the reasons why won't make much of a difference to you, if you're always waiting for the other shoe to drop. So how do you deal with a boss who is always screaming?
  • Supreme Court Hears Pregnancy Discrimination Case: What You Need to Know About Young v. UPS
    In early December, 2014, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) heard an extremely important case for pregnant workers. The question is whether pregnant women are entitled to reasonable accommodations in the workplace. Peggy Young, the woman who started the suit, argues that they are, while her former employer, UPS, argues that they should not have to provide such accommodations. The result of the case will affect every pregnant worker and those workers' families and co-workers from here on, so the stakes are quite high.
  • 4 Jobs for Sociology Majors, Other Than Social Worker
    First things first: most sociology majors won't earn as much money as STEM majors, post-graduation. But when you're choosing a major, it's important to follow your interests as well as considering money. The study of human behavior, how people interact within different structures, and how people relate to each other, is utterly fascinating to many people. If this rings true for you, than majoring in sociology could be a path to consider.
  • How Long Should You Stay at Your Job?
    Over a quarter of Millennials think that workers should stay in a role for less than a year before moving on, according to data collected from PayScale's employee survey, and compiled in the report Gen Y on the Job. Only 13 percent of respondents in the same age group thought employees should stay at a job for more than five years. That's a big shift from earlier generations, and sign that job hopping might be gaining in popularity -- at least among workers themselves. Given that companies pay to train and hire workers, however, and hiring managers probably don't want to see a checked employment history, how do you determine the perfect tenure?
  • 5 Ways HR Can Make Your Life Better
    Many workers spend the bulk of their career trying to avoid dealing with human resources, seeing it as a combination principal's office/courtroom. That's too bad, because there's a lot that HR can do to better your career, provided that you know how to use this function correctly.
  • 5 Ways to Fight Workplace Pregnancy Discrimination
    Last week, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case involving a pregnant woman and the claim of workplace discrimination. According to court documents, Peggy Young requested a weight-lift restriction of 20 pounds from UPS, based on a doctor's recommendation, when she became pregnant in 2008. Instead, she was put on unpaid leave, without benefits.