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  • 3 Ways to Magically Transform Yourself Into a Lucky Person
    Even if you're not superstitious, it's hard not to ascribe other people's good fortune to luck. Everyone knows that one person who seems to always be in the right place at the right time, getting more than their fair share of promotions, raises, and desks near the window. (Understanding, of course, that their fair share should be "equal to or less than you're getting.") So how do these folks do it?
  • 5 Ways to Avoid Waking up on the Wrong Side of the Bed
    You've just woken up, and you're grumpy. And, that bad mood is rubbing off on everyone and everything around you. It's affecting your productivity, your relationship with your family, friends, and co-workers. It just sets you up for feeling like the whole day has started off wrong. We usually refer to it as "getting up on the wrong side of the bed." And, it's usually one of those phrases that we throw at each other, when we're annoyed, hurt, or offended.
  • When It Comes to Job Skills, American Millennials Are in a Race to the Bottom
    The youngest workers, the ones who grew up alongside the latest and greatest technologies, have always been assumed to be more skilled in their use. It's probably been like this since the invention of the typewriter, but it's increasingly true now, in an era when most office jobs rely on digital technologies that adapt seemingly by the minute. In addition, today's young workers are more educated than ever before, boasting more years of education than any previous generation. There's just one problem: recent research shows that Gen Y workers in the U.S. are anything but highly skilled.
  • What a Good Boss Does That Others Don't
    Bad managers are the No. 1 reason workers leave their jobs, so the importance of having (and being) and good boss can't be overstated. The problem, of course, is that it's difficult to arrive at a consensus of what this means. What is it, exactly, that good managers do and bad managers don't?
  • How the Hazards of 'Clopening' Affect You
    "Clopening" is the newest trend in the service industry. In order to shave costs by relying on fewer employees, many employers are scheduling the same person to close up a restaurant at midnight, only to return in seven hours to open. Clopening exists in more industries than just hospitality: retail, security, construction, and nursing are using the practice, as well. The harsh consequences of clopening affect more than just the weary service worker; they affect us all in detrimental ways.
  • College ROI Report: Where to Go to School If You Love to Party (or Want to Do Anything But)
    If you're in the process of choosing a college, you're probably neck-deep in facts and figures. While it's essential to consider the data when making your choice, if you ignore everything but earning potential and graduation rates, you might wind up picking a school that looks great on paper, but is the worst possible place for you, the individual, to build your academic career. The best school for you is the one that takes all your needs into account, including career path, choice of major, and preferred campus culture. With this in mind, PayScale's College ROI report offers lists of the best schools for sports fans, liberal arts majors, future businesspeople, and much more. For example, if you're interested in a party school or need a place that keeps it clean, the following schools might be for you.
  • NBA Asks Men to 'Lean In Together'
    The NBA, alongside the WNBA and LeanIn.org, recently released a new PSA. Featured big names, such as LeBron James and Dwayne Wade, speak about how they support the women in their lives. "When men lean in, everyone wins," the announcement declares.
  • What Counts as Being on the Clock?
    Most people have heard of the 40-hour work week. While some European nations have shorter work weeks for employees, in many American jobs employees expect (and are entitled) to be paid overtime at a rate of one and a half times their regular hourly pay rate for every hour they work over 40 in a given work week. The Fair Labor Standards Act exempts some types of employees, like lawyers, from these requirements, but most lower-wage jobs are covered. For employees who start their tasks the minute they walk into an office and who are able to go home the minute their shift is over, figuring out what counts as "hours worked" is fairly simple. But for some folks in some kinds of job, it’s not that easy. So the question becomes, what counts as work time?
  • 5 Tips on Choosing a College: Confessions of an Art School Grad
    By now, we probably all know someone who struggles with student loan debt or job woes. Many of us young folk went to college hoping to make our dreams come true, only to find ourselves saddled with enormous debt and no job prospects. Young grads are still having trouble nailing down that first professional job, and many people aren't working in the industries they trained for. It wasn't exactly a walk in the park for older people either, whose careers went kaput and they had to go back to school or get new training. Stories from the Great Recession are many among us.
  • Why We Need to End the 'All or Nothing' Mentality About Working Mothers
    If you're rolling your eyes at yet another working mother post, then you're the exact person who needs to be reading this the most. You, like most of society, sigh with annoyance that working moms are at it again, whining about how hard it is to succeed in a career because corporate America won't let you play with its toys. This article isn't here to prove you wrong or convince you that the Earth is flat -- its purpose is to ask that you step back from your conventional ideals and ask yourself, "Am I part of the problem, too?"
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Time Management Lies, Crazy Interview Questions, and What Workers Want More Than Free Food
    If you've ever interviewed at a tech company -- or any startup -- you've probably had a hiring manager try to sell you on the value of fun perks like free food, in-office foosball, and other swag and snacks. In reality, though, these extras are worth much less than other considerations. For example, dealing with a bad boss isn't worth all the cereal General Mills will ever produce.
  • Vodafone Offers 16-Week Maternity Leave, Full Pay for Part-Time Work After
    Last week, Vodafone Group announced that it will offer 16 weeks of paid maternity leave to employees at all 30 of its companies around the world by the end of the year. In addition, returning mothers will be offered a flexible work schedule after their leave is over: for six months, they will be allowed to work 30 hours a week, while retaining their full-time salary.
  • College ROI Report: Will You Earn Enough to Pay Off Your Debt?
    Student loan debt is on the rise. In 2011, 51 percent of first-time, full-time college students had took out student loans, according to the National Center of Education Statistics, an 11 percent increase from 10 years prior. The average size of those loans also increased by 36 percent. During the same period, the country experienced one of the worst recessions in its history, offering college students fewer resources to draw on, in order to offset loans, and dimmer prospects of high-earning employment after graduation. In the latest edition of the College ROI report, PayScale examines which colleges and universities offer the best return and lowest debt load for prospective students.
  • 8 Rules for Cellphone Use at Work
    Cellphones are a part of everyday life for most of us in 2015, yet many businesses still don't have policies where their use is concerned. Even if your company has laid out some rules, there are probably still some gray areas that leave you scratching your head. These tips could help you ensure you're not stepping on any toes, or offending anyone, while allowing you to keep using your phone at work.
  • 5 Ways to Get Tough

    5 Ways to Get Tough
    We all want to be tough. It's something that was ingrained in us from an early age -- more so for boys than for girls -- but the impression we may get is that we should be able to handle everything that is thrown our way. But, what would happen if we set all that aside for a minute, and we re-evaluated what it meant to be tough? On the job, if we took a closer look at our toughness, we might just see that we've approached it in all the wrong ways.
  • Warning to Job Seekers: The Commuter You Just Flipped Off Might Be the Hiring Manager
    It's every job seeker's worst nightmare. A man is running late on the way to a job interview, nervous, and he bumps into some guy boarding a crowded commuter train. He blows up, uses an incredibly rude expletive, and spends the rest of the time on the commute trying to calm down. Upon arriving at the interview, he and the hiring manager recognize each other -- the hiring manager is the guy he insulted earlier this morning.
  • If You Want to Go Places in Your Career, Be Still
    It's frustrating to have people remind you to "stop and smell the roses" when your life seems to be going 1,000 miles per hour -- but that doesn't mean it's bad advice. Learn how taking a step back can actually help you move forward in your life and your career.
  • The Gender Wage Gap Begins During Childhood
    America's gender wage gap is still a huge problem and even an international embarrassment. It's no wonder the topic has been coming up so much lately. But now, some especially startling data is rising to the surface about just how early the discrepancy begins.
  • Religious Discrimination at Work: What Are the Rules?
    Religious discrimination is one area of discrimination that is often mentioned in the news, yet is a very complex and abstract topic. Particularly where one individual’s religious beliefs conflict with another individual's exercise of his or her rights, the subject area can become confusing. That is why it is important for employees to understand what their employers are and are not allowed to do when it comes to religious discrimination.
  • Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is: Women and Money Talks
    A new study finds that women are more likely to discuss medical issues and other taboo topics with others than talk about money matters. We’ll examine the reasons why women are so tight-lipped about talking dollars and cents, despite their keen financial habits.