• Bruising or Beneficial: In the Amazon Debate, What Really Counts Is What You Want (From Your Employer)
    Ever since The New York Times published its scathing, 5,000-word takedown of work culture at Amazon, the topic of work-life balance has been the talk of the town. The commentary won't stop, whether it's from Amazon's most rabid defenders or passionate opponents. Even famously silent CEO Jeff Bezos has issued a response. The resulting debate has been fascinating (and probably a bit cathartic for anybody who found themselves working over the weekend), but searching for a definitive answer about whether Amazon is "good" or "bad" probably won't make a difference in your daily life or sense of job satisfaction. What you can, and should, take from the ongoing conversation is the importance of corporate culture in general and its effect on the way you think about the idea of total compensation, and ultimately, the way you negotiate salary.
  • 3 Ways to Tell if You're Selling Yourself Short in Your Career
    Hating your job is one thing, but staying put and wasting your life and career away is another. We all had wild dreams about what we wanted to be when we grew up, but things don't always play out as we once hoped they would. Chances are, you chose your career based on a combination of what you thought was semi-interesting in college, what your parents thought was right for you, and what had a decent earning potential – but, unfortunately, it's just not cutting it anymore. If this sounds familiar, then you may be selling yourself short, my friend. Here are three ways to tell if you're guilty of cheating yourself out of success in your life and career.
  • The First Women to Beat Ranger School
    It's impressive news. Two women – Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver – overcame seemingly overwhelming odds to pass the Army's Ranger School, at Fort Benning, Georgia. It's a daunting feat for any soldier, but for female soldiers, it's also a milestone: until this year, they weren't even allowed to attempt the leadership course.
  • Why Do We Rank Schools? Vote for PayScale at SXSW, and Find Out
    How does South by Southwest pick its panels? By asking the internet to choose which of its most burning questions deserves an answer first. This year, PayScale has three potential sessions up for your approval: The Rankers on College Rankings: Why We Do It; How To Diversify Tech & Hack Our Unconscious Bias; and How Working in a Social Agency Made Me Hate Social. Use the SXSW PanelPicker, and tell organizers what you need to know.
  • The 10 Best Colleges in America
    What makes a school great? Every publication that ranks colleges and universities has its own methodology, usually a combination of test scores prior to entering school and starting salary after graduation. Business Insider, which debuted its seventh annual ranking this week, uses SAT scores per College Board, median starting salary for grads according to PayScale, and feedback from a survey of over 1,000 readers. Their list might not contain many surprises, but it does provide insight into what makes a top school in 2015.
  • Adobe Offers More Paid Parental Leave
    Netflix and Microsoft have already paved the way, but now Adobe announced that it's joining the other top tech companies in offering more paid leave to parents. Their leave package is now at 26 weeks (10 weeks of medical leave and 16 weeks of parental leave) – that's double what they offered in the past, but it's not even really a surprise.
  • When the Boss Loves Meetings, Escape Using This 5-Step Plan
    If you're a manager looking to shorten meetings, there's plenty of advice out there for you. Tips on how to free up your time when you're not the person in charge are a little harder to come by. That's because managers and the people they manage often have two very different sets of priorities: for the managers, every minute spent in meetings is potentially applicable to their goals; for the managed, meetings often represent a desert of productivity, dead time in which nothing gets done. If you're among the latter group, you might feel powerless to change your circumstances – but you're not totally without options.
  • 4 Ways to Become Indispensable at Work
    We all want job security, but in 2015 it can be pretty hard thing to come by. Of course, no one is totally indispensable; the reality is that we can all be replaced. We all know this. However, there are certain things that you can do to achieve near-indispensability, which should provide that feeling of safety we all crave. Here are some ideas for making yourself essential.
  • Incredible Company Perks: Top 5 Swag and Service-Based Perks
    Imagine penciling "manicure" between "conference call" and "team meeting" on your to-do list, and letting your boss deal with cleaning your house. Or, if whimsy is your thing, think about what it would be like to rent a kitten for your cubicle, or get unlimited free Snickers for the rest of your career. At some companies, perks like these aren't just the stuff of daydreams – they're employees' real-life, workaday experience.
  • How to Break 5 Career-Killing Habits
    Bad habits can be tough to break, but some are worth the effort. There are a few bad habits that could be causing you real professional harm without you even being aware of them. The first step is always identifying that there is a problem to solve. Let's take a look at a few of these career-killing habits and think about how to break them once and for all.
  • Is Amazon a 'Soulless, Dystopian Workplace'?
    This weekend, The New York Times published an exposé of working conditions at Amazon corporate. Amazonians, the article claims, are required to work long hours, in a data-driven environment that means constant performance evaluations; are expected to answer emails after midnight, sometimes at the prompting of follow-up texts; and are encouraged to inform on one another to management. Workers who don't come up to snuff allegedly are culled in layoffs that a former employee describes as "purposeful Darwinism" – some former employees claimed to have been pushed out after miscarriages or cancer. In an internal memo shortly after publication, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos responded, saying that the company described doesn't match his view of the organization and urging workers to come forward if they disagree.
  • What to Do When Your Job Keeps Growing and Growing...
    You know the deal. You're hired to do a job. That job comes with a job description or maybe even a contract that lists the responsibilities and duties assigned to you as said job holder. Next, you start to get comfortable with your new position. Soon, you're doing well, and before you know it, you start winning the respect of your co-workers and even your bosses. You're starting to feel pretty good about yourself, and this job – and that's usually right around the time when things start to change.
  • What We Can Learn From the Man Who Worked 50 Jobs in 50 States
    Finding meaning in one's career is one of the most important (and difficult) goals in a professional's working life. One man quit his cushy corporate career to set out on an epic cross-country voyage in which he held 50 hourly-wage jobs in 50 different states. Here's what he learned about work, meaning, and finding happiness in everyday jobs.
  • Erase These Words From Your LinkedIn Profile Right Now
    We all want to stand out. With more than 100 people on average applying to every job listing out there, it can be hard to make your on-par job skills and drive translate into much more than "I'm the ideal candidate. No, seriously. I'm perfect for this." The problem might be that you're trying too hard to have the perfect profile. In fact, it's so perfect, everyone's saying the exact same thing.
  • The Dress Code Debate: Are Mandals Affecting Your Performance?
    For the northern regions of this country, summer is an especially sacred time: by April, 50-degree weather is impetus for shorts and a t-shirt, whereas Los Angeles folks are still bundled up in the low-to-mid 70s. That said, when summer heat rolls around, it can be especially tempting to take advantage of those fashion mistakes that society will justify in July. If you're an employee of HP, however, they just became much more than a simple faux pas.
  • The Evolution of Gender-Based Career Quizzes
    The use of polarized language as a source of polarized ideas is nothing new. A classic case in point: The Quiz. Though the decision to have a career, a spouse, and/or children is clearly an individual and entirely subjective one, magazines throughout time have provided readers with the sometimes dangerous ability to define their identity, beliefs, and capabilities on the basis of arbitrary questions about life choices. Though such quizzes are silly and pointless when taken literally, comparing the gender-related values represented in contemporary women's magazine quizzes to those that showed up in publications from the 1950s is an interesting exercise that shows how views of women and their careers have shifted, and, for the most part, improved.
  • Research Says Your Bad Boss May Be Even More Damaging Than You Think
    We all know that a difficult boss can make life miserable, but new research shows that it can directly impact our career path – in fact, nearly half of us choose to leave our jobs because of our bosses. With all the toxicity a terrible manager yields, it's almost surprising that the number isn't even higher. Here are a few ways a difficult boss's effects extend beyond plain old unhappiness.
  • 5 Ways to Earn a Promotion Without Asking for One
    The old adage of "don't ask, don't get" is usually true when it comes to promotions and raises. If you don't let your manager know about your career goals, it's much less likely that you'll get to where you want to be. That said, workers often ask for promotions without stopping to consider if they're ready for them, or even if they've earned them. If you want to impress your boss and move up the corporate ladder, what you do is just as important as what you say. Here's how you can show your manager that you're ready – without ever saying a word.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! My Helicopter Parents Might Sabotage My Career
    Today's parents are pretty involved in their children's lives – often to a degree that seems excessive to those of us who grew up (or raised kids) in the '70s and '80s and were lucky if we knew we knew what a seatbelt was and that cheese didn't naturally form in pre-packaged single slices. Unfortunately, some of these helicopter parents don't let go once their kids graduate and join the work world. In this week's roundup, we hear from one such adult child, plus get some tips on what recruiters want to see on your resume and how to free yourself from negativity.
  • Your Cover Letter Might Be Costing You the Job
    Composing cover letters may be one of the most arduous aspects of applying for work, but it seems that they remain a necessary evil. The purpose of the cover letter is to introduce yourself to an organization in the context of the specific job to which you're applying. Cover letters are pointedly aimed toward each potential opportunity, whereas the rest of your application package might be similar to what you use for other job openings. A cover letter can make or break your application, so it's important to avoid certain common pitfalls in order to maximize its benefits.

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