• 10 Buzzwords to Eliminate From Your LinkedIn Profile for, Like, Ever [infographic]
    Gone are the days when listing cliche keywords -- like motivated, passionate, and experienced -- on your resume got you noticed by recruiters. Read on to see which buzzwords were most overused on LinkedIn last year, so that you don't end up blending in with the rest of the crowd in the new year.
  • Your Job Is Encouraging Absenteeism (But Here's How to Fix It)
    Absenteeism is obviously a problem for businesses; productivity suffers when people don't come to work and temporary fill-ins can be expensive. But having co-workers call in sick too often also has a detrimental effect on those of you who are left behind to shoulder the burden. Spot the warning signs that your workplace and your own job are suffering due to absenteeism, and deal with the root causes directly.
  • Hemingway: Is This the Coolest Editor App Ever?
    Named for Ernest Hemingway, who was known for his clear, tight, rich style of writing, this editing app is designed to help writers revise their own pieces in a new way. Whether you compose presentations, speeches, online content, or just a lot of emails, this app can make a huge difference in the way you write.
  • #SOTU 2015: Middle-Class Economics and Expanding Opportunity
    "The shadow of crisis has passed," said President Obama, in last night's State of the Union address. "And the state of the union is strong." While receiving standing ovations for job numbers (and getting in an ad-libbed dig at Republicans about winning the presidency), Obama outlined a vision for the country that focused on middle-class growth.
  • Association Discrimination: The ADA Does Not Just Protect Disabled People
    Typically, when people think of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), they think of two parts of it: the part that protects disabled people from workplace discrimination and the part that requires buildings to take steps to be accessible to disabled people. What most people do not realize is that there is also a very important portion of the law that protects those who are in some way associated with a disabled person from being discriminated against at work because of that association.
  • The 10 Most (and 10 Least) Profitable Undergraduate College Degrees
    Of course, you could make your millions after earning your bachelor's degree in English or art history, but if high earning potential is your post-graduation goal, you'll want to target your educational plans accordingly. (Hint: think STEM.)
  • 21 Pieces of Career Advice We'd Give Our Younger Selves
    If you could go back in time and give your younger self career advice, what's the one thing you'd say? For some, it would be to negotiate a higher salary or start investing more heavily in a 401k. Others might go all the way back to college and follow their dreams -- or pick a career with a better occupational outlook, and fund their personal projects that way.
  • State Legislators Attempt to Shut Down Paid Sick Leave for Pennsylvania Workers
    In December of 2014, a task force in Philadelphia that was formed to study the issue of the benefits and pitfalls of paid sick leave came to its conclusion: Paid sick leave is necessary. Now, two Pennsylvania state senators are announcing their intent to propose legislation to preemptively prohibit mandatory paid sick leave for employees. Two steps forward, three steps back.
  • 8 Reasons Why Volunteering Is Good for You (and Your Career)
    Whether you are in-between jobs or looking to change your line of work, volunteering can be a good proposition to keep yourself engaged and busy. If you are considering entering the non-profit sector, what better way to break in than volunteering? (Especially if you didn't get the interview call, in spite of your resume updates.)
  • Unemployment Is Down, So Where Are the Wages?
    If you've been waiting for a fatter paycheck to find you in 2015, so far the news has been discouraging. Unemployment rates are down, which is exciting news, but we still haven't seen an improvement in wages. Here's why a lower unemployment rate hasn't translated to higher pay -- yet.
  • 9 Things to Consider Before Making an Employee Referral
    If you work for a well-known company or in a coveted field, you may have already received requests from friends, relatives, acquaintances, and LinkedIn contacts to forward their resumes for a suitable role in your organization. This could put you in a bind if you're dealing with a good friend who would be a bad fit for the culture or an acquaintance you know nothing about -- and let's not even talk about the random LinkedIn request. So what should you do without damaging your relationship or reputation at work?
  • Your Mid-30s Is a Great Time to Change Careers
    There is nothing wrong with changing careers at any point in your life -- in fact, there is a lot to be said for it. After years of doing the same thing, the challenge and the excitement can wear off, and it can start to feel as if you're ready for something new. Statistics show that most people will make a career change five to seven times over the course of their life. Not all of these changes are major, but whether you're considering changing your whole career, or just shifting from one job to another within the same career category, your mid-30s are a great time to shake things up.
  • Today's 4 Least Stressful Jobs
    Some jobs are more stressful than others. A recent study from CareerCast analyzed careers according to 11 specific demands placed on workers that are known to cause stress. The list evaluated factors like like travel time, competitiveness, and deadlines.
  • Smartphones in the Workplace: Productivity Tool or Time Suck?
    Forty-five percent of American adults owned a smartphone as of 2013, according to EdTech Magazine. Used well, these devices can make your personal and professional life easier -- provided you have good boundaries and can disconnect when you need to.
  • Man Gets Fired for Not Coming to Work for 24 Years
    Do you ever feel like nobody at work is paying attention to what you do, to the extent that you could stop showing up for work, and maybe no one would notice? A. K. Verma, a civil servant in India, did not show up for work for 24 years. Then, he got fired.
  • 5 Hard and Soft Skills That Will Get You Hired
    When it comes to job searching, the internet giveth and the internet taketh away. It's easy to find job listings, but arguably tougher than ever to stand out from the crowd of qualified applicants. However, if you have the right skills -- and know how to draw attention to them on your resume -- your chances of being noticed by a recruiter are pretty darn good.
  • Obama Pushes Paid Leave for Americans
    Yesterday, President Obama signed a memorandum directing federal agencies to give employees up to six weeks of paid leave after the birth or adoption of a child -- that's a "benefit he wants to extend to all American workers" with the Healthy Families Act, according to The New York Times. It's also long overdue. While the Family and Medical Leave Act provides for 12 weeks of unpaid leave, that magical "paid leave" is discretionary.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Don't Stalk the HR Manager
    Sometimes, the job interview process feels like the worst parts of dating. So much depends on having good instincts and good luck, and no matter how clever you are, you're always going to be plagued with at least a little self-doubt. This week's roundup kicks off with advice that will help job seekers avoid overdoing the follow-up after an interview. (Plus: tips on goal setting after your New Year's resolutions fail and more insight into why the gulf between older and younger workers sometimes seems so huge.)
  • 9 Job Fair Tips to Get You Hired
    Job fairs don't end in offers, but they do help candidates get a foot in the door of their targeted organization. Depending on your experience level, a job fair maybe a good place to meet prospective employers, connect with HR personnel, and expand your network.
  • Today's 4 Most Stressful Jobs
    There is a lot to consider when choosing a profession. Stress is not the only factor that comes into play when making that decision. In fact, many of the most stressful jobs identified through a recent study from CareerCast are especially rewarding, stimulating, and important careers. But, they certainly are stressful.