• 'Women Make Better Leaders,' Says Research (and Mr. Wonderful of Shark Tank)
    "Women make better CEOs." These fine words come from none other than Kevin O'Leary, better known as Mr. Wonderful on ABC's The Shark Tank. O'Leary holds an impressive business portfolio, and 55 percent of the CEOs in it are women. Why, then, are women so exceedingly underrepresented in high-level, leadership positions still to this day? One ongoing study examined just that.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Quit Your Job, Become a Social Introvert, and Change Your Attitude
    One of the toughest things about life, both personally and professionally, is that there's only so much you can control. You can't change your nature, for example, and become wildly extroverted if you're someone who draws her energy from within, and you can't necessarily make a bad job into a good one. You can, however, learn to make things better by cultivating certain skills and improving your attitude. And sometimes, you can quit your job and go on to another one -- if you go about things the right way.
  • More Family Time Helps Fathers' Careers
    There is a lot of talk these days about balancing our work lives and our family time. Parents are torn between professional and personal pulls and too often feel as though one priority is pushing another onto a back burner. Also, family dynamics have changed in some big ways in recent decades alongside increased pressure for workers. These days, both fathers and mothers value a high level of involvement in raising children, and often both work full-time. We are just beginning to explore how these changes have impacted working fathers.
  • 5 Inappropriate Workplace Touching Lessons From Joe Biden
    Maybe you're a hugger, or a back-slapper, or -- in your personal life -- a terrible flirt. Chances are, you know that none of this behavior will fly in the office, no matter how innocent your intentions. No one wants to be referred to HR for remedial training or, worse, lose their jobs because they didn't get the memo that it's 2015, and co-workers don't touch each other. In this, we are probably more with the program than many of our leaders in Washington. Take, for example, America's touchy-feeler-in-chief, Joe Biden.
  • The 5 Most Stressful Food Service Jobs
    There's a reason the great Tina Fey once said that her job producing, writing, and starring in 30 Rock was less stressful than "managing a Chili's on a Friday night." The job is set up to encourage stress: everything you have to do needed to happen five minutes ago, it's a multitasking nightmare, and you're dealing with the public. Often, the public is hungry. Always, the public seems to have gone out to eat because they're not allowed to abuse their families at home. You get the idea: food service is stressful.
  • Meet the YouTube Millionaires
    Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)
  • What Men Need to Know About Sex Discrimination Laws: They Are Protected, Too
    Usually when people think about sex discrimination, they think about discrimination against women. After all, most sex discrimination laws were enacted in order to alleviate discrimination against women who enter the workforce. However, while women may be the most obvious beneficiaries of these laws, men are protected by them as well. The same provisions, like Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, that prohibit discrimination against a woman for being a woman also prohibit discriminating against a man for being a man.
  • Why Women Don't Negotiate Salary, and What to Do About It
    We've all heard about the gender wage gap, and experts love to wax eloquent on the reasons why women make less money. Some say that women tend to choose occupations that pay less, others blame women for taking time out to raise children. There is plenty of evidence pointing to another reason, however: research shows that women make less money than men for performing the same work because of societal expectations of behavior for men and women. Women likely fall victim to these expectations even if we don't realize it; we can counter these deep-seated cultural norms to our own benefit.
  • 4 Things You Must Do After Your Annual Performance Review
    Your annual performance review is over. Hopefully, you have some new goals to work on and a few pats on the back to keep you motivated. Now what?
  • 11 Questions You Should Not Ask at Interviews
    Toward the close of the interview, your interviewer might give you an opening to ask any questions you may have. This is a great opportunity to sound intelligent, prepared, and excited about the role. This is a good chance to impress the interviewer with your homework and understanding of the role and the organization. An unprepared question, on the other hand, could completely nullify your candidacy.
  • Are You a Toxic Employee? [infographic]
    Is your office a den of negativity? If you're constantly complaining to co-workers about how much you hate your job, looking for any and every excuse to get away from your desk, and gossiping more than talking about work projects, the problem might be you. Find out if you possess any or all of the 13 most common traits of a disengaged and toxic employee, and change your ways before you tank your career.
  • 3 Totally Fixable Ways Email Is Making Your Job Harder
    Live by technology, die by technology -- or at least, be forced to deal with inconveniences created by the very tools that were intended to liberate us from extra work. For an example, look no further than email, which can save precious hours of face-to-face meeting time and provide an instant record of conversations, but also become a time-suck in its own right. Here are a few of the biggest problems with the productivity tool everyone loves to hate, and how to overcome them.
  • 3 Simple Lifehacks to Improve Your Health and Boost Your Mood
    If the monotony of everyday working life is starting to chip away at your well-being, then it's time to switch things up in your daily routine … and STAT. A few minor tweaks to your schedule can make all the difference in your health and wealth. Here's how.
  • What Millennials Can Teach Other Generations About Work-Life Balance
    The generation born between 1980 and 1995 is now firmly entrenched in the workforce, and they are committed to doing things a little differently than the generations that came before them. Their ideas are fresh and creative, and they bring unique experiences and special areas of strength to the table. With these differences in mind, it's not surprising that their professional goals, and the way millennials pursue them, are diverging from the path laid out by earlier generations.
  • These Are the 5 Happiest Food Service Jobs
    High stress. Low pay. Little to no job security. There's a reason that many of the food service occupations PayScale examined for its recent Restaurant Report rate poorly for job satisfaction or job meaning, or both. But that doesn't mean that everyone who works in the restaurant business hates their jobs. Here, we examine some of the job titles that reported being happier at work.
  • We Need More Women in Tech, and Here's What You Can Do About It
    Women are less likely than men to go into STEM careers, but it's not from a lack of initial interest or talent. Somewhere along the way, girls and women are turning in other directions, with the result that only about 18 percent of women earn degrees in computer science and 19 percent earn engineering degrees, according to the National Girls Collaborative Project.
  • What Your Colleague With Autism Wants You to Know
    People with autism have a different way of communicating than typicals, but their ideas and contributions are just as valuable. Learn how to network with people on the spectrum for an inclusive and productive work environment.
  • 10 Tips to Help You Succeed as a New Manager
    Maybe you've been a great individual contributor, and your stellar performance has made management realize your potential and promote you. Or, you just cracked the interview so well, your new employer was willing to take the risk of hiring you as a manager, even though you've not had any people management experience. Either way, you do want to excel in your new role. Here's how.
  • 5 Reasons to Get to Work Early
    Most mornings, hitting the snooze button a time or 10 feels a lot more enticing than catching the worm and getting to work early. However, the benefits of doing so far outweigh the drawbacks. Even if you aren't a morning person, it might be worth considering an earlier start.
  • The Birds and Bees of the Modern Office Romance
    In Mike Nichol's endearingly unrealistic '80s romcom Working Girl, Melanie Griffith portrays Tess McGill, an inexperienced but savvy young professional embattled in a competition for professional (and romantic) success with her powerful, idea-stealing boss Katherine Parker (Sigourney Weaver). The moral of the story? Do the right -- albeit slightly duplicitous -- thing, and you get not only your dream job, but also the guy you knew you always deserved.