• Congress Considers Drastic Cuts to Pension Plans
    For the first time ever, Congress may move to cut pension benefits to current retirees. Proposed legislation, which would take the form of an amendment to a $1.1 trillion spending bill, would cut benefits for multiemployer plans, common in the grocery, trucking, and construction industries, and often managed jointly by employers and unions.
  • 5 Job Search Tips for Pregnant Job Seekers
    Pregnant and unemployed. The words alone may make you want to cringe. After all, being either pregnant or unemployed could represent a stressful situation in your life. Taken together, it's just a bit scary. All the "normal" concerns of being jobless instantly become intensified when you're looking for a job while also preparing for the delivery of your baby. Just because it's more complicated doesn't mean that it's impossible to find a job that's perfect for you.
  • The Art of the (E-mail) Close
    Signing off as "Salty" instead of "Sally." Including 18 line items in your signature block, including your parents' home number. Forgetting that you already pushed "send" on your daily e-mail to your mom, and closing the subsequent e-mail to your boss with, "Love, Sean XOXO." Realizing that upon sending said e-mail to your boss, you accidentally hit "reply all" and thus also sent your hugs and kisses to your entire team. The ways we can bungle a professional e-mail are endless and there is arguably no worse way than how we sign off.
  • Put 2 Narcissists Together to Boost Group Creativity
    It may seem counterintuitive to build teams that include multiple people with narcissistic personality traits; these folks tend to want to be the center of attention and in charge. However, if you want to spur creative thinking and problem-solving in the workplace, this is exactly what you should do.
  • 7 Tips to Deal With a Boss Who Yells
    Although they are diminishing in number, there still are managers whose first reaction to stressful situations is to yell. Sometimes, it's the people you'd least expect: something about pressure brings out the worst in them, and they react by chewing everyone out. Of course, the reasons why won't make much of a difference to you, if you're always waiting for the other shoe to drop. So how do you deal with a boss who is always screaming?
  • Supreme Court Hears Pregnancy Discrimination Case: What You Need to Know About Young v. UPS
    In early December, 2014, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) heard an extremely important case for pregnant workers. The question is whether pregnant women are entitled to reasonable accommodations in the workplace. Peggy Young, the woman who started the suit, argues that they are, while her former employer, UPS, argues that they should not have to provide such accommodations. The result of the case will affect every pregnant worker and those workers' families and co-workers from here on, so the stakes are quite high.
  • 4 Jobs for Sociology Majors, Other Than Social Worker
    First things first: most sociology majors won't earn as much money as STEM majors, post-graduation. But when you're choosing a major, it's important to follow your interests as well as considering money. The study of human behavior, how people interact within different structures, and how people relate to each other, is utterly fascinating to many people. If this rings true for you, than majoring in sociology could be a path to consider.
  • How Long Should You Stay at Your Job?
    Over a quarter of Millennials think that workers should stay in a role for less than a year before moving on, according to data collected from PayScale's employee survey, and compiled in the report Gen Y on the Job. Only 13 percent of respondents in the same age group thought employees should stay at a job for more than five years. That's a big shift from earlier generations, and sign that job hopping might be gaining in popularity -- at least among workers themselves. Given that companies pay to train and hire workers, however, and hiring managers probably don't want to see a checked employment history, how do you determine the perfect tenure?
  • 5 Ways HR Can Make Your Life Better
    Many workers spend the bulk of their career trying to avoid dealing with human resources, seeing it as a combination principal's office/courtroom. That's too bad, because there's a lot that HR can do to better your career, provided that you know how to use this function correctly.
  • 5 Ways to Fight Workplace Pregnancy Discrimination
    Last week, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case involving a pregnant woman and the claim of workplace discrimination. According to court documents, Peggy Young requested a weight-lift restriction of 20 pounds from UPS, based on a doctor's recommendation, when she became pregnant in 2008. Instead, she was put on unpaid leave, without benefits.
  • Do You Suffer From Nice Girl Syndrome?
    Ten years ago, Dr. Lois Frankel wrote Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office. At the time, it had quite the impact. Frankel helped women understand that the societal pressure they'd received to be nice, and their desire to be liked by their co-workers, was negatively affecting their success.
  • Get the Most Out of Overqualified Workers
    Many managers fear that overqualified workers will be unproductive, due to boredom or a sense that the job is beneath them. There is also concern that they might find something better and quit. For these reasons, we often don't even consider hiring employees who look like they'd be better suited to a higher-level position. Here's why that's a mistake.
  • Here's How to Say No to More Projects
    You're juggling multiple projects, all on a tight deadline, and are just about managing it. Just as you find a minute to take a break and do your anti-carpal tunnel syndrome stretching, your manager comes over with another super-important project with a very close deadline. You want to refuse, but are afraid it may cost you all future projects, maybe even your job. So what do you do?
  • How Your Job Can Help You Through a Tough Time
    We all go through difficult times once in a while. Whether it's an illness, divorce, grief, or some other struggle that's got you down, it can be really hard to face the workday when your life is pulling at your heartstrings. But, you need your job, and you recognize the importance of putting one foot in front of the other and carrying on, even though that's easier said than done. The good news is, if you approach this thoughtfully and intentionally, and if you remember to be kind to yourself along the way, your job might actually be able to help you get through this tough time.
  • How to Deal With an Extremely Competitive Colleague
    If your co-worker does not let you in on relevant information that she "meant to" share with you, takes credit for your work, does not give you the complete picture of projects, keeps all her cards close to her chest, spends a lot of time in the manager’s office, and bags projects you didn't even know about, you may be dealing with a highly competitive colleague.
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Better Networks, Freedom From Email Slavery, and Early Retirement
    Which stories shaped your career this week? The big headline is obviously the jobs reports. The ADP report, which is based on payroll data from private employers, showed gains of 208,000 jobs for November. The news from the Bureau of Labor Statistics was even better: non-farm payrolls added 321,000 jobs last month. For workers, this is good news -- but it's not the whole conversation. To see what else is working Americans' minds this week, we turn to some of the most popular career bloggers on the internet.
  • Independent Contractors: Are You Secretly an Employee?
    There are rules governing whether employers may classify workers as employees or independent contractors. Sometimes people are hired (or contracted) as one type of worker, when their work fits the definition of the other. Here is how you can tell if your legal status matches the work you do.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 321,000 Jobs Added, Beating Expectations
    Prior to this morning's report from the Labor Department, economists were predicting gains of 230,000 jobs for November. Instead, The Employment Situation Summary reported the addition of 321,000 jobs to non-farm payrolls last month. This marks the tenth straight month of 200,000-plus job gains. Unemployment held steady from last month's report at 5.8 percent.
  • Why You Should Never Lie During the Job Interview Process
    Whatever you do, don’t blatantly lie -- not on your resume, not in the interview. There are only two outcomes to lying for a job: you get caught and you don’t get caught. Either way, the impact of your lie can be long-lasting. It can surface at any point, during an investigation, a job promotion, even a transfer.
  • When Discrimination Is Allowed: About Bona Fide Occupational Qualifications
    As a general rule, employers are not allowed to discriminate based on certain factors like sex and sometimes age. However, what many people do not understand is that anti-discrimination laws like the Civil Rights Act or the Age Discrimination in Employment Act actually do allow for discrimination under some circumstances. One time employers are allowed to discriminate is if they are doing so because of a "bona fide occupational qualification." Both federal and most state anti-discrimination laws also allow for this defense.