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  • Should Women Wear Red to Work?

    Colors have subtle and often subconscious effects on our perceptions and behaviors. Red is sometimes associated with anger, and is a bold, bright color to which men and women often respond differently. Should you see red in your work clothing?
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  • How Colleges Are Attracting More Women to Computer Science

    One of the biggest problems facing the tech industry is the significant lack of women filling engineering roles at both large and small companies. For the past few years, experts have been debating the reasons why there are fewer women in tech, but recent data suggest this problem lies -- and can be fixed -- within our education system.
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  • 3 Ways to Calm Down in a Hurry

    It's an unfortunate fact of life: the times in your career when you need to be the most levelheaded are also the times when you're least likely to be feeling calm, cool, and collected. Whether it's a big presentation in front of colleagues from another office, or a scary meeting with the boss about a deliverable that didn't get delivered, dealing more positively with anxiety can mean the difference between turning a tricky situation to your advantage and making things worse.

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  • Student Loan Bill Introduced by Marco Rubio and Mark Warner

    A bipartisan effort addressing the student loan crisis is underway with new legislation aimed at making payments more manageable and reducing defaults. The Dynamic Repayment Act was introduced in the Senate last week by Senators Marco Rubio (R-Fl.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.). Struggling borrowers are no doubt hopeful about possible relief, but no one should hold their breath. Congress will still have to approve.
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  • Higher Minimum Wage Correlates With Job Growth

    One of the biggest arguments against raising the minimum wage has been a pay hike's potential impact on job growth. Many business groups argue that employers won't be able to hire more people if they can't offer low wages. However, recent data from the Department of Labor shows that this might not be the case. Twelve of the 13 states that raised their minimum wage since the beginning of the year have experienced more job growth than lower-wage states.
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  • Which Tech Companies Are Hiring More Women?

    It’s no secret that women are severely outnumbered in tech companies in Silicon Valley. Recent reports indicate that women at both small and large employers such as Facebook and Google are barely represented, indicating this is a concerning trend in the technology sector. However, there are several other companies at which women are gaining ground, representing larger percentages of the workforce.
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  • When the Passive-Aggressive Co-worker Is You

    Many of us are not comfortable with confrontation. That's a problem in the workplace, where communication is key. Fail to deal with conflict honestly, and you might wind up sabotaging a project ... or even your whole career. Here's how to recognize these tendencies in yourself and deal with them.
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  • Which College Majors Study the Most? [infographic]

    The average student spends 17 hours a week preparing for class, according to The National Survey of Student Engagement. That includes studying, reading, analyzing data, and doing assignments and lab work. That's far less than the 45 or so hours per week recommended by most schools for students taking 15 credits of coursework, but not every major is equal when it comes to study time.

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  • What New Graduates Should Know About LinkedIn

    It’s summer and that means that a whole new crop of college graduates are hitting the working scene. Many of these new graduates will be using LinkedIn as a main source of scouting job opportunities. If you’re one of those fresh new faces, here’s what you need to know about securing a position that may be the first step in your career.
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  • Google to Pay for Women, Minorities in Tech to Learn More Code

    There's good news if you’re a woman or minority in tech and work for Google. The tech giant is in the process of "debugging inclusion," which is a geeky way to say that the company is trying to improve their numbers where women and minorities in tech are concerned.
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  • Imposter Syndrome: When You Feel Like a Fake

    Competent, capable people who have worked hard to get where they are sometimes suffer from "imposter syndrome." This normal phenomena can have disastrous results if you don't recognize it for what it is, and learn how to deal with it. Don't let imposter syndrome hold you back.
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  • Microsoft EVP Stephen Elop's Layoff Memo: By the Way, You Might Not Have a Job Next Year

    Yesterday, the hinted-at changes in Microsoft's workforce took shape and heft, to the tune of 18,000 job cuts over the next year. The figure represents about 14 percent of Microsoft's workforce. The majority of those cuts, 12,500 jobs, will come in Microsoft's devices and services unit, which absorbed Nokia last year. How did workers in the mobile unit discover this? In the eleventh paragraph of a memo from former Nokia CEO and current Microsoft executive vice president Stephen Elop.

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  • Court Upholds U. of Texas Affirmative Action Policy

    Consideration of race in admissions will continue at the University of Texas per a federal appeals court ruling this week. In a 2-1 vote, the appeals court upheld an earlier district court ruling which found the school’s use of race as a supplemental factor in bringing together a diverse student population to be fair. However, the school's fight to keep affirmative action is not over.
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  • Can Having a Terrible Job Make You a Better Person?

    We've all been there -- seemingly stuck in a job that is less than fun. In fact, a job can be terrible, causing us to second-guess our every move at the office. At the end of the day, in a job like this, it can be easy to confuse your own value and self-worth with your employment.
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  • How to Write a Great LinkedIn Invite

    If you’re looking for a new career opportunity, LinkedIn can be a great resource. It’s filled with people who are searching for someone, maybe even you, to fill an open job. The question is, how do you reach out to them in a way that makes sense?
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  • When Your Boss Won't Stop Questioning Your Every Move

    Some bosses can't stop asking questions. "Why are you doing that? Will this really work? Are you sure? Why do you think so?" A barrage of this type of questioning makes many people feel that their bosses do not trust them. It's like taking care of a curious toddler, but it's not cute when it's your boss. Here's how to handle the situation.
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  • Fewer Freshman College Students Returning for Sophomore Year

    The rate of first-time college students returning for their sophomore year in 2013 dropped 1.2 percentage points, compared with the entering class of 2009, according to a new report from The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. The retention rate, however remained about the same, meaning that college students who left school were more likely to drop out entirely, and less likely to leave one school in order to enroll somewhere else.

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  • Could Using Your Smartphone at Work Improve Productivity?

    A new study gives hope to everyone who's ever surreptitiously checked their personal email or slain a few swine in Angry Birds on the company time. Far from being a distraction, the research suggests, occasional smartphone usage seems to boost productivity.
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  • 5 Tips for Finding the Right Mentor for You

    A good mentor can mean the difference between career success and stagnation, but there's a caveat: even the most visionary leader won't be much use to you, if the relationship isn't right.

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  • What to Do Right After You Have Been Fired or Laid Off

    It’s Friday morning and there is an eerie feeling going around the office. People seem on edge, and your boss is communicating with you via sternly worded emails that are direct and to the point. Some of these emails may even criticize your recent job performance. You may even know that you’ve made a serious mistake, or you may have been the target of an unruly supervisor or manager who has made your life extremely difficult for weeks, months, or even years. All the signs add up to the last email of the day telling you to come up to the human resources manager’s office, where he or she informs you that your employment with the company is being terminated. What now?
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