• What Your Colleague With Autism Wants You to Know
    People with autism have a different way of communicating than typicals, but their ideas and contributions are just as valuable. Learn how to network with people on the spectrum for an inclusive and productive work environment.
  • Deflate Your Bullying Boss With Passive-Aggression
    Bullying: it's not just for schoolyards anymore. Bullying is simply the act of humiliating and causing harm, sometimes physical, to other people. Unfortunately, bullying behavior is highly durable because bullies often get what they want. In other words, bullying works for the bully. Passive-aggressive behavior may deflate your bully's bubble.
  • Neuroscience Tells Us How to Be Productive
    The science of the brain has much to tell us about how to be productive and how to lead others. Optimize your behavior at work, and increase your productivity, your team's productivity, and your memory skills.
  • Reading on a Computer Screen Before Bed Is Killing Your Productivity
    Technology has changed the way we work -- you already knew that. Executives and business owners used to be the only people who took work home; now lots of people either take work home or work from home exclusively. The problem is not working in the evening from the comfort of your own home; the problem is that the blue light in your computer, tablet, or e-reader screen is destroying your sleep cycle and causing the symptoms of sleep deprivation, even if you technically sleep through the night.
  • Your Job Is Encouraging Absenteeism (But Here's How to Fix It)
    Absenteeism is obviously a problem for businesses; productivity suffers when people don't come to work and temporary fill-ins can be expensive. But having co-workers call in sick too often also has a detrimental effect on those of you who are left behind to shoulder the burden. Spot the warning signs that your workplace and your own job are suffering due to absenteeism, and deal with the root causes directly.
  • State Legislators Attempt to Shut Down Paid Sick Leave for Pennsylvania Workers
    In December of 2014, a task force in Philadelphia that was formed to study the issue of the benefits and pitfalls of paid sick leave came to its conclusion: Paid sick leave is necessary. Now, two Pennsylvania state senators are announcing their intent to propose legislation to preemptively prohibit mandatory paid sick leave for employees. Two steps forward, three steps back.
  • Man Gets Fired for Not Coming to Work for 24 Years
    Do you ever feel like nobody at work is paying attention to what you do, to the extent that you could stop showing up for work, and maybe no one would notice? A. K. Verma, a civil servant in India, did not show up for work for 24 years. Then, he got fired.
  • The Rise of the 'Uni-Moon' and the Decline of Work-Life Balance
    When married couples cannot even take their honeymoon together because they are unable to coordinate time off from work, something needs to change. This rather disturbing new trend is called a "uni-moon," and it is not helpful to work-life balance.
  • It's Not Just About STEM: The Case for a Well-Rounded Education
    With the high cost of post-secondary education, you could be forgiven for wondering whether it's worth it to take classes unrelated to job training. Specifically, many students feel pressure to concentrate on STEM degrees, which yield the highest dollar-for-dollar return on investment. While the desire to be employable is good, foregoing a well-rounded education is short-sighted. Even if you're fortunate enough to love science and math, here's why you should leave the engineering department once in a while, in order to maximize your college experience.
  • Positive Self-Talk Is Self-Defeating
    Who wouldn't want to believe that wishing hard enough makes good things happen? Unfortunately, the reality is quite different, no matter how hard self-help authors might try to convince us otherwise. Instead of visualizing what you want, you must plan ahead and do the hard work required to meet your goals. As a matter of fact, all that positive self-talk and fantasizing about where you will be five years may be holding you back.
  • Choice Blindness: You Really Don't Know What You Are Doing
    When we make decisions at work, we are often asked to explain or defend our choices before and even after they have been put into effect. Studies show that people often are not aware of their choices after they have made them, and this "choice blindness" may have serious effects upon their behavior at work.
  • Use These 3 Communication Techniques to Get Ahead
    You need to communicate in order to get what you want, whether it's a raise, a promotion, or inclusion on a team or project. Psychology offers proven communication and persuasion techniques that can increase your chances of achieving your career goals. Here's how.
  • 5 Resume Mistakes to Avoid
    Your resume gets your foot in the door -- or it gets thrown in the trash. The good news is that careful crafting of an effective resume is easier than you think. Remember these three things: relevant, recent, and honest. At the same time, avoid the five biggest resume mistakes listed beneath the cut and be on your way to your next job.
  • 8 Rules for Office Kitchen Etiquette
    The room in the workplace that is rife with the most conflict and emotional turmoil is not the boardroom, or your boss's office, or that conference room that's most often used for annual reviews. It is the office kitchen.
  • How to Fight Bias in the Workplace From the Inside
    Leadership roles no longer automatically go to white men -- at least, not overtly. While many companies have made strides in opening up management positions to women and people of color, we have a long way to go before the corporate ladder allows everyone to ascend based solely on merit. Recent research shows that unconscious bias still informs leadership decisions, promoting white men to positions of power when the chips are down.
  • Smiling May Cost You the Job
    Just when you thought you had job interview body language down -- look squarely in the hiring manager's eyes, give a firm handshake, and smile, smile, smile! -- the latest research indicates that showing your pearly whites might actually work against you.
  • How to Make Useful Decisions About Everyday Work Problems
    We all have to make tough decisions sometimes. Depending upon your role and level in your organization, you may be faced with difficult choices regarding hiring and firing other people, or setting budgets, or crafting policies that affect everyone's experience at work. Often enough, somebody affected by your decisions won't like them. The solution? Learn when to focus on utilitarian decision-making, and you'll be able to make better choices.
  • Put 2 Narcissists Together to Boost Group Creativity
    It may seem counterintuitive to build teams that include multiple people with narcissistic personality traits; these folks tend to want to be the center of attention and in charge. However, if you want to spur creative thinking and problem-solving in the workplace, this is exactly what you should do.
  • Get the Most Out of Overqualified Workers
    Many managers fear that overqualified workers will be unproductive, due to boredom or a sense that the job is beneath them. There is also concern that they might find something better and quit. For these reasons, we often don't even consider hiring employees who look like they'd be better suited to a higher-level position. Here's why that's a mistake.
  • Independent Contractors: Are You Secretly an Employee?
    There are rules governing whether employers may classify workers as employees or independent contractors. Sometimes people are hired (or contracted) as one type of worker, when their work fits the definition of the other. Here is how you can tell if your legal status matches the work you do.