• Avoid These 3 Body Language Mistakes and Get the Job
    There is no guarantee that your body language alone will get you a job -- you have to have the right educational background and skill set, too. However, when you are competing for a position with other candidates who look as good as you on paper, subtle interactions during your interview can make significant differences. Avoid mistakes and look your best for your soon-to-be employers.
  • Know Your Rights as a Pregnant Employee
    The laws protecting pregnant women at work are getting stronger, but some workers are still being discriminated against. Know your rights so you can stand up for yourself before you are taken advantage of or subjected to illegal treatment.
  • Best and Worst States for Women's Equality
    Many things go into measuring women's equality at work, including the all-important gender pay gap, and the percentage of women filling executive positions in different companies and geographic areas. The following data will show you how your state ranks in issues regarding women's equality in the workplace.
  • The Simple Theory of Motivation That Helps Workers Succeed
    Want to motivate your team to do their best work? One of the easiest ways to do it is with Hertzberg's two-tiered theory of motivation, which focuses on motivator and hygiene factors to improve job satisfaction and commitment.
  • Beyond Good Luck: A Sense of Control Increases Motivation, Productivity, and Achievement
    As long as workers can attribute their wins to luck, they don't have to feel bad about their losses. Of course, the downside to that is that they also don't get to take credit for their success. If you want to motivate your team to take responsibility, learn from their mistakes, and excel in their work, you might consider applying attribution theory.
  • Waitresses Are the Most Sexually Harassed Occupation
    The restaurant industry has a unique business model. Rather than business owners budgeting to pay employees, restaurant owners depend upon customers "voluntarily" giving waitresses and waiters tips in return for "good service." That pay structure can lead to a dangerously imbalanced power dynamic between customer and waiter. No wonder, then, that a recent report from Restaurant Opportunities Center United found that two-thirds of female employees in the food service industry have been sexually harassed. In fact, 37 percent of Employment Opportunity Commission harassment claims come from women in the restaurant business.
  • Work Friendships Are Not Necessarily Real Friendships
    Work friendships are good to have, but they are different from and do not take the place of real friendships. Recognize the difference between the two and enjoy the benefits of each, but avoid making the mistake of relying on work friends for real, personal companionship and confidence.
  • Managers: Increase Productivity By Giving Your Reports What They Want
    Looking for ways to motivate employees? Look no further; the tenets of Expectancy Theory will guide you to pay attention to what your workers want and reward them in ways they appreciate. Different workers may want different things, but all workers will become more productive when they know the reward will be something they value. It's not always a raise, either. Sometimes, it's just a pat on the back.
  • The Power of Introverts and the Benefits and Pitfalls of Group Work
    You've likely heard these adages before: "Many hands make light work." "Two heads are better than one." "The more, the merrier." There is truth in all of these sayings, but there are other, paradoxical truths as well. Extroverts may look forward to group meetings and talking about their progress on the group's project. However, all of this togetherness may be holding the introverts in the workplace back. The most productive office allows people the flexibility and autonomy individuals need to get their work done, and done well.
  • Use This Psych Experiment to Motivate Your Team
    Want to motivate your workers? Let them know they're being watched. This is less creepy than it sounds on the surface: social psychologists have observed that people work harder when they know that their colleagues are paying attention. It's less about being Big Brother, and more about being part of a community. In other words, if you're a manager, simply being engaged with your employees can make a big difference to their productivity.
  • How to Motivate Your Team With Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
    The science of psychology is full of theories about motivation and productivity that are relevant in the workforce today. You can use this knowledge to motivate your team, to increase their productivity, and to have a happy, energetic, and dedicated workforce. Incorporating Maslow's hierarchy of needs is one great way to increase employee motivation.
  • At Work, It's Better to be a Father Than a Mother
    While working mothers struggle with decreased pay and lack of status in a workplace that sees them as unreliable, working fathers enjoy improved status, pay, and benefits that help a growing family survive.
  • How to Deal When You Don't Like Your Co-Workers
    In a perfect world, we would want to be friends with all our co-workers. The world, however, is not perfect, and many employees are stuck negotiating relationships with colleagues they'd never choose to have in their lives, if it were up to them. Knowing how to assert your boundaries without alienating everybody can help you keep things professional.
  • You Don't Have to Be an Entrepreneur
    If you watch Shark Tank, the reality show in which would-be moguls pitch their ideas to celebrity businesspeople, you've probably heard Mark Cuban say the following to at least one business owner: "You are not an entrepreneur, you're a wantrepreneur." That might sound bad --"wantrepreneur" sounds a lot like "wannabe" -- but it's not that cut and dried. There are creative people who would not make great entrepreneurs, but who have great ideas and much to contribute beyond being a cog in somebody else's machinery.
  • Is Your Workplace Psychologically Healthy? These 5 Questions Help Clarify
    Psychologically healthy workplaces don't need to be perfect -- just functional. You may enjoy a great supervisor but put up with toxic co-workers, or you may have a great place to work but a boring job. The following questions will help you clarify what works and what needs improvement in your work life.
  • When to Quit a Job You Love

    Last week, we talked about how to tell when your body is telling you you need to quit your job. Sometimes, however, you might feel great about your job -- or at least, like it just fine -- but still need to quit for various reasons. It's not always obvious; learn to spot subtle signs and the writing on the wall.

  • When Your Gut Says, 'It's Time to Quit'

    Quitting a job isn't something we do on a lark. Financial considerations, career concerns, and a dearth of available alternatives keep many people at their current place of work even when they might prefer to be elsewhere. However, paying attention to sometimes subtle signs that you are done here may help you plan for a better future and save your sanity. Listen to your gut.

  • A Brief History of Women's Fight for Equal Pay
    As long ago as 1776, Abigail Adams implored her husband to "remember the ladies" while drafting the Constitution. John Adams was not easily swayed, asserting that men "know better than to repeal our masculine systems." Women have been fighting for the right to be treated as equals ever since, including the right to be paid the same as men for similar work. The following is a brief history of attempts to ensure equal pay for women in modern times.
  • How to be a Happy and Successful Entrepreneur

    Starting your own company can be one of the most terrifying things you will ever do. The buck will always stop with you, and with that freedom comes incredible stress. The strain may cause havoc with your health. A vital part of being a successful entrepreneur is to have the right mindset.

  • How to Develop a Good Leadership Mindset

    A huge part of being an effective leader is having the right mindset. Good leaders don't think they are better than everybody else; rather, they recognize that each and every one of us has our own skills and weaknesses. A good leader wants to encourage workers to use their skills and to improve on their weaknesses. But it's more complicated than just that.