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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Rebound From Burnout
    Feeling totally done with work today? Unfortunately, it's probably not time to go home yet. Worse, maybe your problem isn't just a "today" issue – burnout can sneak up on you, and knock out your productivity for quite some time. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to prevent and overcome burnout, plus methods for dealing with academic isolation, and how to do just one thing that will make your boss love you forever.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 215,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Unchanged at 5.3 Percent
    After a relatively soft ADP report, tallying the addition of 185,000 jobs to private payrolls in July, this morning's release of the Employment Situation Summary from the labor department is good news. The report, which includes government jobs as well as those in the private sector, showed that total non-farm employment increased by 215,000 jobs last month, just shy of the 223,000 jobs predicted by economists. Unemployment was flat at 5.3 percent.
  • Microsoft Doubles Maternity Leave, Increases Paid Parental Leave
    A day after Netflix announced it would offer a year of unlimited, fully paid leave to all new parents, Microsoft announced improvements to its own parental leave policy, as well as increasing 401(k) match and adding paid holidays to the company calendar.
  • 5 Working Parents Share What It's Really Like to Use Parental Leave
    Last night, Netflix announced what may well be the most generous parental leave policy in the country – which isn't saying much, given that the U.S. mandates no paid leave, and offers only 12 weeks of unpaid time off for new parents. To get a sense of how radical (and unusual) policies like these are, we asked working parents in a variety of industries to share their experiences of the state of parental leave in the United States today.
  • Netlix Offers 'Unlimited' Year of Paid Maternity and Paternity Leave
    The United States is one of only four countries in the world that doesn't guarantee any paid leave for new parents. Americans who work for the government or private companies with 50 or more employees are usually covered under the Family and Medical Leave Act, which allows 12 weeks of unpaid leave in a 12-month period – but when expenses are higher than ever before, families are often hard-pressed to use unpaid leave. As a result, employers in competitive niches like tech use paid parental leave as a way to woo in-demand talent, with giants like Google and Facebook often topping the list. On Tuesday, Netflix announced a paid parental leave policy that would make even the most pampered employees green with envy: unlimited time off, at full pay, after the birth or adoption of a child.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 185,000 Jobs in July
    Prior to this morning's release of the ADP National Employment Report, economists predicted the addition of 215,000 jobs to private payrolls. The actual number, 185,000, was the lowest since April.
  • Here's Why Your Office Is So Cold
    If you're a woman and work in an office, you're probably longing for fall, and not because you enjoy autumnal fashion and Pumpkin Spice Lattes. No, for many of us, the end of summer will mean the end of freezing to death under the arctic blast of the office air conditioning. Before you roll your eyes, menfolks and other warm-blooded people, go put your hands in the freezer for a few minutes and then come back and try to type something. We'll wait. When you return, cast your eyes on the abstract of a recent study, published in the journal Climate Change and entitled Energy Consumption in Buildings and Female Thermal Demand, which demonstrates what many female office workers have been saying for years: the office thermostat is set with men in mind.
  • 10 Standout Tips From #MondayMotivation
    Supposedly, Monday is one of the most productive days of the week, but some weeks, you couldn't prove it by how many of us feel. After a weekend of chores and catchup and sometimes, sneaky bits of work when our loved ones aren't looking, it's no wonder we don't feel super motivated come the first day of the week. Ironically, help arrives via one of the greatest means to waste time and tank your productivity: Twitter.
  • 1 in 3 Workers Have Fallen Asleep on the Job
    How are you feeling today? If you said, "sleepy," you're not alone. In fact, one survey found that 31 percent of human resource leaders have seen or heard about a worker falling asleep on the job. The cost to companies is obvious – $63.2 billion in lost productivity due solely to insomnia – but if you're among those sleep-deprived workers, you're probably more concerned about the fact that all that lost sleep is impacting you personally and professionally.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Kill the Vocal Fry, Get the Job You Deserve?
    There's plenty of debate about whether or not vocal fry, that Kardashian-esque speaking affectation, is bad for you, professionally. Some experts claim that talking like a reality TV star will permanently cripple your career, while others note that even high-level financial executives now embrace the professional equivalent of baby talk. Regardless, having more awareness of and control over your public image is always a good thing. This week's roundup covers how to manage vocal fry, plus networking without feeling phony, and staying productive during the lazy days of summer.
  • Key & Peele Asks, 'What If We Worshipped Teachers Like We Do Pro Athletes?'
    Imagine a world in which teachers are hired via a draft broadcast live from Radio City Music Hall, do commercials for major brands, and scoop up contracts worth tens of millions of dollars. Or, you know, just watch Key & Peele's latest sketch, TeachingCenter, which does it for you.
  • These Are the 5 Least Meaningful Jobs (According to the People Who Do Them)
    Even if your job is just for the paycheck, and you get most of your joy and satisfaction after work hours are over, you probably don't want to work at a totally meaningless gig. After all, if you're going to spend at least a third of your life – and most of your waking hours during your workweek – at your job, it'd be nice if you got something out of it besides the means to pay the rent. If meaningful work is important to you, you'll want to take a look at PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs – special emphasis on these jobs, which workers say are least likely to make the world a better place.
  • What Does 'Job Meaning' Mean, Anyway?
    PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, looks at which occupations are described by workers as making the world a better place. The jobs that make the list probably won't come as a surprise – surgeon is on there, as is English teacher and clergy member – but that doesn't mean that every high-meaning job looks exactly the same.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: The Case of the Singing Employee
    What's the weirdest thing you've ever seen at the office? For one manager, it's probably the time a report pulled out a harmonica and started singing his status update. The question, of course: is that OK? And if not, how exactly do you tell your subordinate that this is not the opera episode of Mr. Rogers? All that, plus avoiding student mistakes, and how to accept a job offer the right way, in this week's roundup.
  • These Jobs Make the World a Worse Place (Say the People Who Do Them)
    What did you want to be when you grew up? Chances are, it was along the lines of unicorn wrangler or astronaut/basketball player – just the sort of thing that's impossible find a major in, never mind a grownup job. That doesn't mean that all real jobs are boring or unsatisfying; during the compilation of PayScale's latest report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, workers with titles as diverse as English teacher and chiropractor told us that their jobs made the world a better place. And then were the other folks, the ones whose jobs made them long for the days when "vet who specializes only in kittens" seemed like a reasonable career path.
  • The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs
    Does your job make the world a better place? Some professions are more likely to answer "yes" to that question than others – and which ones might surprise you. PayScale's report, The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs, looks at which occupations have high meaning, and which make workers feel like their job is hurting the world more than helping. If you're thinking about changing careers, or just want to see how your job stacks up, this report is for you.
  • Portland, Maine Accidentally Gives Tipped Workers a Raise
    Language matters, especially when it comes to legislation. Recently, we had proof of this when the Affordable Care Act nearly deflated thanks to an alternate interpretation of the phrase "established by the state." Now, city officials in Portland, Maine, find themselves in a similar bind: confusion over the language in a recent bill to raise the city's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour led city council to nearly double tipped workers' wages, from $3.75 to $6.35 an hour, as of January 1. The accidental raise was met with dismay from restaurant owners and delight from labor organizers. Both dismay and delight, however, might be short-lived.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Teachers Really Do With Their 'Summers Off'
    If you're a professor, teacher, or grad student, you're probably sick of hearing people say that you get the summer off. But for non-academic types, it seems like a sweet deal. This week's blog roundup looks at why those summer months aren't as much fun for teachers as they are for students; plus, insight into why feedback is so hard on so many of us, and what to do to really drive your co-workers crazy (if that's your goal).
  • Those Open-Plan Office Blues: 7 Horror Stories to Make You Long for Walls
    Ah, open-plan offices. Proponents say they can encourage creativity and collaboration among staff members, while allowing workers flexibility to decide where in the office inspiration is most likely to strike. Of course, open-office boosters generally have another reason to push for them: fewer walls can mean less square footage per person, which equals lower real estate costs. As commenter Meghan C. said, "What bugs me most about open floor plans is imagining The Powers That Be sitting in their @#$% offices saying how great open floor plans are." If you're not a fan of the wall-free office, these tales of woe, collected from Facebook users, will seem pretty familiar.
  • Ellen Pao's Reddit Resignation Reveals the Enduring Sexism of Tech
    Picture this: a new CEO makes a series of controversial changes to the company's hiring process, policies, and product. Eventually, a popular staffer is fired, and the community revolts, starting a Change.org petition, a hashtag campaign on social media, and even sending death threats. Sound surreal? It might be – if the CEO were male. As former Reddit CEO Ellen Pao's resignation demonstrates, it's not at all a strange set of circumstances for a woman in charge.