• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Master the Sneaky Job Hunt
    The best time to look for a job might well be when you have a job, but that doesn't mean it's easy to engage in a lengthy interview process while you're still employed. This week's roundup looks at ways to do that without tipping off the boss – or at least, without alienating him or her. Also in the roundup: the never-fail job search tips you're probably ignoring, and ways to include testimonials on your resume, so there's no way hiring managers can miss how impressive you are.
  • 2016 PayScale College ROI Report Shows How Household Income Affects Earnings After Graduation
    The poor often stay poor – even if they're college graduates. This year, for the first time, PayScale's annual College ROI Report looks at how household income prior to attending college relates to income after graduation. In short, students who enter college from lower-income households don't see the same return on their tuition investment as students who start off with more money in their pockets.
  • #WednesdayWisdom: 5 Career Tips From Successful Entrepreneurs
    Whether you're trying to get promoted or start your own business or just figure out what you want to be when you grow up, sometimes there's no substitute for expert advice. And who better to advise you than some of the most successful entrepreneurs, productivity gurus, and businesspeople in the world? Probably you don't have the ability to call up Tim Ferriss or Sheryl Sandberg and ask them what you should do with your life, but you don't need to. Reading their thoughts on their own career trajectories and the lessons they learned along the way might be enough.
  • 3 Career Lessons for Working Women From Hillary Clinton (Even If You're Voting for Someone Else)
    Understatement of the election year: Hillary Clinton is a polarizing figure. For some, she's inspirational – potentially the first female president, a woman who can get things done, the most accomplished candidate in terms of raw political experience. People in this camp tend to say things like, "If the presidential race were a job interview, you'd have to hire her, no question." But, then, of course, there's the other perspective, which says that she's not trustworthy, that she's made bad decisions when it counted, and that she might have broken the law. People who agree with this point of view tend to say things like, "She should be indicted." Today, we're not here to talk about whether either of these takes is right. We're here to talk about Hillary Clinton, the leader, and what working women can learn from her – yes, even if they're voting for Bernie or Cruz or Kasich or Trump, or writing in "Wonder Woman" and calling it a day.
  • Twitter Offers 20 Weeks of Paid Parental Leave for Moms and Dads
    Families were never as "traditional" as politicians or 20th century stereotypes would have us believe. Throughout human history, primary caregivers have come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and ages. Until recently, however, it was pretty hard for even high-earning executives at elite U.S. companies to get paid time off for a new baby – especially if they weren't female and/or hadn't given birth to the child. But all that is changing. Today, Twitter joins the ranks of tech companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Microsoft, in offering fully paid parental leave for any parent who wants time off to care for a new baby.
  • 125 Companies Where Nearly Every Employee Works From Home
    FlexJobs, a job listing site specializing in work-from-home, part-time, contract, and other flexible jobs, is itself a virtual company – all of its employees work from home, telecommuting from around the U.S. So it makes sense that FlexJobs would track virtual companies that offer not just flexibility, but potentially full-time work-from-home situations. Each year, the site puts out a list of the top virtual companies for telecommuters. This year's list contains a whopping 125 employers, up from 76 last year, and 26 the year before.
  • New York State Gets Paid Family Leave, $15 Minimum Wage
    Today, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed legislation that will bring the minimum wage in New York State up to $15 an hour over the course of the next few years, and also provide the most comprehensive paid family leave in the country. The family leave policy, which will phase in starting in 2018, will eventually provide for 12 weeks of paid family leave, capped at 67 percent of the statewide average weekly wage.
  • #MondayMotivation: 10 Pieces of Wisdom on Optimism From Baseball Players

    Yesterday marked Opening Day, the first day of the MLB season, and the last day every baseball fan starts off their morning filled with hope. Traditionally, by the end of the day, some of the more Eeyore-like fans have transitioned from, "Maybe this is our year," to, "This year will be an epic disaster." You're more likely to be one of those if your team lost one of the three games played yesterday, but it's not impossible to develop a glass-half-empty approach even if they didn't play at all. Trust me on this: I'm from Boston.

    As much fun as it is to be a cynic, too much pessimism isn't really good for you. Concentrating on the negative can impact your health, happiness, and even your career. Fortunately, baseball offers a cure, as well as means to develop the disease.

  • 5 Workers on the Best and Worst Parts of Their Commute
    Commuting is expensive, annoying, and might even impact your health. Still, unless we manage to score work-from-home jobs for our whole careers or win the lottery, most of us will wind up doing it at some time or another. Whether our commute stays a minor irritation or becomes a major stumbling block to our happiness in both personal and professional life depends on a number of factors, including personal preference, traffic patterns, and whether we're able to convince the boss to let us have a flexible schedule.
  • The PayScale Index Shows Annual Wage Growth of 1.8 Percent for Q1
    Are wages growing? It depends on what industry you're in. The PayScale Index, which measures the change in wages for employed U.S. workers, updated this morning, reflecting 1.8 percent annual growth across all industries for the first quarter. Quarterly growth, however, was 0.2 percent, and some sectors fared better than others. For example, while wages grew 4.6 percent for transportation jobs, they declined 2.2 percent for marketing and advertising jobs.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Will Finding a New Job Be More Difficult This Year?
    If you're thinking about changing jobs in the coming months, you're probably anxiously scanning headlines for any news story having to do with the job market. Will it be harder to find a job this year than it was last? Many job seekers seem to think so. Although perception isn't everything, it's always interesting to know what other job seekers think of the market. This week's roundup looks at that, plus why you really and truly need to be on LinkedIn, and how to interview when you're an introvert.
  • Play These 5 Pranks at Work, and You'll Be the April Fool
    Ah, April Fools' Day: the day when some normally sensible professionals regress to high school students targeting a particularly reviled substitute teacher. It's bad enough that the entire internet now teems with fake ad campaigns and bogus products (although we did finally get that Tauntaun sleeping bag, at least). There's no need to compound your co-workers' misery with intra-office April Fools' pranks, as well.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 215,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5 Percent
    There were no big surprises in this month's Employment Situation Summary from the Labor Department: the economy added 215,000 jobs, just exceeding economists' predictions, and the unemployment rate rose slightly, from 4.9 percent for February to 5 percent for March. Perhaps the biggest news, however, was wage growth. Average hourly earnings increased 7 cents to $25.43, after a 2-cent decline the previous month. But some experts feel that we're still not seeing the kind of wage growth expected from a market that's supposedly approaching full employment.
  • Why Aren't There More Women in Leadership Roles?
    We all know that there are fewer women at the top than men, but it's still shocking to see the actual numbers. Only 22 of Fortune 500 CEOs are women, and only three – Indra Nooyi of PepsiCo, Ursula Burns of Xerox, and Lisa Su of Advanced Micro Devices – are women of color. Women aren't just underrepresented in business leadership roles, either; they also make up just 19 percent of the U.S. Congress and 26 percent of college presidents. Recently, the American Association of University Women released a report, Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership to examine why there are so few female leaders, and what we can do to close the gap.
  • Could These Be the 5 Most Bizarre Job Interview Questions?
    Job interview questions should have only one purpose, and that's to figure out whether or not the candidate is a good fit. Unfortunately, some hiring managers didn't get that particular memo, and take interview questions – particularly behavioral ones – to ridiculous extremes. Think less "Tell me about a time you faced a challenge at work" and more "If you were any object in a kitchen what would you be and why?" Sure, sometimes these questions are a creative way of digging out the interviewee's best and worst qualities, but other times, they're just plain strange. You'd be forgiven for wondering, on the applicant side of the table, if the hiring manager was just messing with you.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 200,000 Jobs in March
    Prior to this morning's release of the monthly ADP National Employment Report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting the addition of 194,000 jobs to private payrolls in March. The actual tally, 200,000 jobs, just exceeded their expectations.
  • People Are Living in Indoor Boxes Now in San Francisco, Because the Rent Is Too High
    OK, fine, it's just one person, but isn't that still too many? Freelance illustrator Peter Berkowitz currently lives in an 8-foot-long, 4.5-foot-high wooden box in his friends' living room. He tells The Washington Post that his decision to construct and move into the box wasn't "fueled by poverty," but rather the desire to achieve "some kind of middle ground between having a bedroom and sleeping on a couch."
  • How to Keep Your Lazy Co-Worker From Ruining Your Career
    If you listen to NPR's Morning Edition on your way to work, you probably heard their recent segment, Before You Judge Lazy Workers, Consider They Might Serve a Purpose, which used agricultural studies involving ants and surprising advice from productivity experts to make the case that lazy individuals aren't always bad for the group. If you are not a lazy individual, but a member of the team that has to deal with them, however, you might have started your day with a white-knuckled rage grip on the steering wheel, screaming at your windshield as other commuters tried to pretend they were absorbed by the flow of traffic. Laziness, good? Tell that to the folks who have to pick up the slack. Why should Ferris get to ditch when everybody else has to go?
  • How Your New Salary Negotiation Hero Scored a $30,000 Raise
    In the post-recession economy, most people would count themselves lucky to get a 3 percent annual raise, or make a jump to a new job that gives them a couple of extra thousand dollars a year – even if that bump seems to disappear, once taxes come out. But not Claudia Telles. The 28-year-old quality specialist tells Business Insider that she managed to jump from a $41,000 annual salary to $72,000 – all without leaving her employer.
  • California Is About to Raise the Minimum Wage to $15 Per Hour
    Gov. Jerry Brown announced Monday that California has reached a "landmark deal" to increase the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2022, after lawmakers made a tentative agreement over the weekend. If approved by the state assembly, the deal will make California the first state in the nation to adopt a $15 minimum wage for all workers.

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