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  • Why Every Job Seeker Should Write Their Autobiography
    Thanks to social media, when most of hear "biography," we think of Twitter mini-bios – the kind that contain a bunch of one-word descriptors, punctuated by periods, and are limited to 160 characters. But according to Aliza Licht, author of Leave Your Mark: Land Your Dream Job. Kill It in Your Career. Rock Social Media, we might want to start thinking bigger, especially if we're not getting job offers.
  • 3 Totally Painless Networking Tips for People Who Hate Networking
    Even if you're the shyest or most introverted person in the world, you're probably already networking, without even knowing it. That's because "networking" is a terrible word for a thing most of us do anyway: build relationships. The goal is to maximize what you're already doing, plus look for additional opportunities that fit with your personality and lifestyle – in other words, to network painlessly, in a way that will build your career and not drive you crazy.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Quiz – Are You Living Up to Your Full Potential?
    When we were in school, guidance counselors checked in with us to see how we were progressing. As adults, well, let's just say we could go a long time without thinking about whether we're still headed in the right direction. This week's roundup looks at a simple quiz to help workers be their own guidance counselors. Plus: how to kill collaboration, not that you'd want to, and how to work with those co-workers you wish would find another job.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Find Your Own Personal 'Board of Directors'
    One of the toughest parts of transitioning from being a full-time student to a working professional is the lack of framework. All of a sudden, there are no tests, no grades, no clearly defined projects with a beginning, middle, and end. Success is harder to define, and while the sky's the limit, the goal posts can seem to toward the horizon with every step you take. The good news? While your working hours belong to the company, your career belongs only to you.
  • 5 Tricky Ways to Shorten Meetings
    Meetings are a mystery. Everyone claims to hate them, and yet they proliferate on our calendars like Tribbles on Star Trek. The explanations for why that happens are many and varied, including different goals for management and staff, ineffective communication techniques, and just plain old ego. (If you've ever had a boss who loved to hear himself talk, you're familiar with this issue.) Here's how to keep meetings short and get back your time.
  • Early Career Success Guide: Don't Forget About the Soft Skills
    Hard skills will help you get the job, but if you want to keep it (and excel) you need soft skills as well. Knowing how to communicate effectively, rebound from a setback, and express commitment to your work will impress the boss, your co-workers, and your company's clients – all of which will make it easier to show off what you can do.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Get Along With the Boss
    Chances are, by the time you start your first "real" job, you've had bosses before. But what was appropriate at the ice cream stand or landscaping gig might not be OK in your new office environment. Even if you've had tons of internships and lots of practice dealing with corporate culture, expect a learning curve when you begin your first professional job. Every company and manager is different. If you want to be a success, you'll need to learn how to adapt and communicate with your particular boss.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Talk to Your College Grad About Getting a Job
    What's the difference between guiding and nagging? If you're a parent, the answer probably is, "Depends on the day." There are few times more challenging to parents of grownup kids than the period after graduation, when their newly minted grads head into an unknown future (and possibly back to their childhood bedroom). The challenge, of course, from a parent's perspective, is how to encourage them in their budding career, without driving them nuts. This week, we look at Kelsey Manning's advice for parents of recent grads. Plus: tips for brand-new Twitter users, and how to answer the dreaded question, "Don't you think you're overqualified?"
  • BLS Jobs Report: 280,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.5 Percent
    This morning's Employment Situation Summary from the labor department exceeded economists' predictions and showed an increase in average hourly earnings as well. The economy added 280,000 jobs last month, more than the 225,000 predicted by economists, and the unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 5.5 percent (compared with 5.4 percent for the previous month). In addition, March and April's reports were revised upward by a combined 32,000 jobs.
  • Maybe Don't Wait for the Weekend to Apply for Jobs
    One of the challenges of looking for a job when you have a job is finding time to apply, without taking the risks of applying on the company time. For that reason, some job seekers dedicate their weekends to job searching, sending off their cover letters, CVs, and cold inquiries on Saturday and Sunday. There's just one problem: a recent study shows that by waiting until no one's in the office, you might be consigning your resume to a black hole.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Use Data to Get Your Dream Job
    A long time ago, when I was a newly minted job seeker, a school friend and I sat down to talk about our job prospects – and how much we thought we should be paid. "I'm figuring on $60,000 a year to start," she said. When I asked how she came to that number, she replied, "Well, that's about how much I think I need to pay off my loans and live in the manner to which I'd like to become accustomed." Needless to say, her first administrative assistant job, way back in the year (intentional mumbling to obscure my age), did not come through the way she'd hoped, in terms of pay.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 201,000 Jobs in May
    After five months of declining jobs numbers, this morning's ADP National Employment Report showed gains of 201,000 jobs – almost exactly as economists predicted ahead of the release. The previous month's report was revised downward slightly, to 165,000 jobs.
  • Seriously, Do Not Lie About Your Salary as a Negotiation Tactic
    While the best salary negotiation advice is to try not to divulge your salary history, or to push the hiring manager to state a range, many won't play along. That's because they know that the person who names a number first is at a disadvantage – and they'd prefer to be "Not It." This is supremely frustrating to a job seeker. You could be forgiven for thinking that the best thing to do would be to stretch the numbers a bit, when asked to name your most recent salary.
  • All Stay-at-Home Parents Should Get a 'Wife Bonus'
    Someday, Dorothy will pull back the curtain on the internet and we'll discover not a man pulling levers, but the greatest communication tool of the 21st century, entirely powered by human outrage. Look no further than the recent flap over social researcher Wednesday Martin's forthcoming book Primates of Park Avenue, which examines the phenomenon of the "glam SAHM" – real Real Housewives who probably don't change a lot of diapers, but spend their time managing the careers of the future one percent. The inspiration for the furor? Like their financier husbands, these ladies apparently get a cash bonus for their efforts.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Find Meaning at Work
    A 2014 survey by The Energy Project found that workers who find meaning in their work have 1.7 times higher job satisfaction, are 1.4 times more engaged in their jobs, and are three times more likely to stay at their employer. In short, if you want to enjoy what you do – and keep doing it – the most important factor may well be whether or not you find meaning in it. But what if, like many recent grads and newly minted professionals, you don't find much purpose in your 9 to 5? Then, it's time to get creative.
  • Early Career Success Guide: What If You Don't Know What to Do With Your Life?
    Only 53 percent of college graduates get a first job related to their major. Obviously, this is even less likely to be the case, if you studied for love and not for money or a clear career path. But does that mean that you're doomed to wander the job market, searching fruitlessly for a good-paying job that you'll actually enjoy?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: My Co-Worker Plans to Quit After Maternity Leave. Should I Tell?
    When we were kids, the rules of the playground were simple: don't snitch, unless you or someone else was in serious danger. As adults, it's slightly more complicated. For example, what if – like an Ask a Manager reader – you know that your colleague is planning to take paid maternity leave, and then quit? Alison Green's answer to that question, plus Dan Erwin's latest reading list, and Emmelie De La Cruz's tutorial on personal branding, in this week's roundup.
  • Introducing PayScale's Guide to Early Career Success
    First jobs are important. Not only do they provide your first real glimpse of your industry from the perspective of a paid professional, but they can set the tone for your career (and salary) for years to come. Of course, career paths zigzag, and it's totally possible to bounce back from a soul-crushing first job and a lousy paycheck and move on to be a shining success – but wouldn't it be nice to skip the whole underpaid, underappreciated thing, and move on to the good stuff? PayScale's free Guide to Early Career Success offers expert advice to help you do just that.
  • Do Millennial Workers Really Job Hop More Often?
    There's nothing more frustrating to a manager than investing in hiring, training, and supporting a new employee, only to have him take off after a couple of months or a year. No wonder, then, that the stereotype of the job-hopping millennial inspires such derision. Who, exactly, do these whippersnappers think they are?
  • 3 Things You Need to Know Before You Negotiate Salary
    In a perfect world, you'd never have to learn how to negotiate salary. Companies would pay a fair market rate, and give reasonable cost-of-living and appropriate merit increases every year. In reality, well, things are a bit more complicated. Getting the salary you deserve takes research, courage, and a little bit of finesse – but most of all, it takes preparation. Here's what you need to figure out before you sit down to the negotiating table.