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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Old School Skills, Salary Negotiation Don'ts, and Lies Happy People Don't Buy
    How can you tell a happy person from, well, everyone else? Often, it's that they spend less time tracking what other people think, and more time paying attention to their own goals. This week's roundup includes the false assumptions happy people don't make, plus a post on why we should thank our high school teachers for those classes we hated, and tips on what to avoid when negotiating salary.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 126,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Unchanged at 5.5 Percent
    This morning's report from the Department of Labor was a relatively grim one, reflecting 121,000 fewer jobs added than predicted by economists, and the lowest job creation numbers since December 2013. Employment rose by 126,000 jobs, and the unemployment rate remained at 5.5 percent.
  • Snapchat Transforms New Grads Into Paper Millionaires
    Most recent college graduates would be thrilled just to get a job fresh out of school. If it pays the bills and makes a dent in those student loans, so much the better. But for some graduates of select engineering schools like Stanford, going to work at Snapchat will do more than just make ends meet.
  • Horrible Company Policy Alert: Some Employers Require Doctor's Notes for Sick Days
    Have you ever thought to yourself, "This is a pretty good job, but it could be better, if only my employer would treat me more like a child"? If not, you'll probably be less than impressed to hear that at some companies, only a doctor-excused absence will do, when it comes to using that sick time. (Whether or not you have any sick time to start out with, of course, is another thing entirely.)
  • Please Don't Play Any of These Horrible April Fools' Pranks at Work
    Depending on your perspective, April Fools' Day is either the highlight of the year -- or a great day to work from home. Even if you're totally anti the entire concept of April Fools', you have to admit that some pranks function as a kind of team-building exercise: something funny happens, everyone has a laugh and blows off steam, and hopefully, co-workers feel closer. Unfortunately, when pranks go wrong, they go really wrong, leaving a trail of hurt feelings and dented career prospects in their wake.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 189,000 Jobs in March
    Private companies added 189,000 jobs last month, according to this morning's ADP National Employment Report, fewer than the 225,000 predicted by economists and the lowest gains in over a year.
  • Spot These 5 Signs of a Bad Employer, During the Interview
    First things first: there's no way to tell, with absolute certainty, what it will be like to work for a company before you sign on the dotted line. That said, you can do your due diligence ahead of time to figure out whether the corporate culture is a good fit for you and up your chances of making the right choice. Research the company on the internet and pay attention to its interactions with employees and customers on social media -- but most of all, watch for these important signs when you meet with the hiring manager during your interview.
  • Depressed and Need Help? Here's Where to Find It
    It's an especially tough time to be having a tough time at work. Thanks to the proliferation of social media and the 24-hour news cycle, anyone with access to a screen sees dozens of references to the latest tragedy every day. Occasionally, those sad stories include a perpetrator who allegedly suffered from mental illness. Leaving aside for a moment the issue of whether or not it's fair for pundits to appoint themselves mental health professionals and diagnose a cause and effect, it's hard to see -- especially if you're feeling less than well yourself.
  • Hey, Managers: Stop Emailing Your Employees at Night
    Mobile technology was supposed to set us free from the tyranny of the 9-to-5, allowing workers to escape the office and plug in wherever they happened to be, and work when inspiration struck. Instead, studies show, improvements in technology have blurred the boundaries between work-time and personal-time, and changed managers' expectations of the managed. In short, many bosses and employers now expect workers to check their email at night, on the weekends, even on vacation. The result? Workers are getting mad, and getting less done.
  • After 'Religious Freedom' Becomes Law in Indiana, Businesses Vote With Their Dollars
    On Thursday, Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, effectively allowing businesses to refuse to serve gay customers. In the days since, some companies have responded by restricting or terminating their investments in Indiana.
  • Negotiation Stories: 'The Best/Worst Time I Asked for a Raise'
    When PayScale compiled the Salary Negotiation Guide, less than half of the 31,000 respondents said that they had ever negotiated salary. Why don't more people ask for a raise? For 28 percent of those who declined to negotiate, it was because they felt uncomfortable asking for more money. When you read some of these stories, it will become clear why some people feel that way.
  • 3 Ways Colleges Are Wasting Your Money
    Want to get mad? If you have ever attended or plan to attend college, take a look at a Ted Scheinman's recent Pacific Standard article, entitled How Colleges Misspend Your Tuition Money. The URL, which includes the phrase "pay for decent teachers, not Dr. Phil," gives the first hint of what lies ahead. Hint: it's not a sound investment in teaching staff, but if you've talked to any underpaid, untenured adjunct faculty lately, you probably already knew that.
  • Why You Should Take Your Paid Time Off
    Forty-one percent of American workers don't take all of their vacation days, according to a study by the U.S. Travel Association, despite the fact that 96 percent of respondents recognized the value of taking time off. Without downtime, workers are less productive, less engaged, and just plain less happy at work. So why aren't we taking all our PTO?
  • Salary Negotiation Fail, Fixed: What to Do When You Accidentally Lowball Yourself
    Is there any part of the interview process that's more horrifying than answering the dreaded salary requirements question? You can dodge it all you want -- and you probably should -- but if the hiring manager won't budge, you'll probably have to come up with some sort of an answer. Chances are, you'll know right away if you named a number that was lower than you could have requested. The gleam in the HR person's eye will tell you all you need to know. The question is, can you improve the situation, or are you stuck with your range?
  • Everything You Need to Know About the Minimum Wage Debate
    Should we raise the minimum wage? On the surface, it seems like an easy question: only Ebeneezer Scrooge would suggest paying the lowest-earning, hardest-working employees a wage that won't support their families. When we delve deeper, however, the issue gets more complex.
  • You Might Love Your Job, But Your Job Doesn't Love You
    Even if you're the most optimistic, upbeat person in the world, you know that there's no such thing as job security these days. If you're fortunate enough to like your job, however, it's easy to forget about that for the time being. Over at Lifehacker, Alan Henry reminds us why we shouldn't.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Draft Your Team Like an NFL Manager, How Depression Affects Your Job, and Answering the Second Most-Awkward Interview Question
    Even if you're not into sports, you can learn a lot about leadership -- good and bad -- from watching the managers of professional sports teams. It all comes down to using data to help you make better decisions. Plus, also in this week's roundup: how depression affects working memory, and thus our productivity, and the best way to answer, "Why are you looking for a new job?"
  • College ROI: What If STEM Isn't for You?
    Every year, one things stands out in PayScale's College ROI report: STEM degrees offer the highest return on students' tuition dollar. That means that the schools that offer degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math tend to come out on top of the ranking. It doesn't mean, however, that you should try to force your artist's heart to embrace STEM.
  • 5 Career Lessons From the Notorious R.B.G.
    It's never too late in life to change the world ... or become an internet meme. In the case of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, changing the world has been her full-time occupation for most of the past eight decades. Internet fame, on the other hand, descended more recently.
  • 3 Ways to Magically Transform Yourself Into a Lucky Person
    Even if you're not superstitious, it's hard not to ascribe other people's good fortune to luck. Everyone knows that one person who seems to always be in the right place at the right time, getting more than their fair share of promotions, raises, and desks near the window. (Understanding, of course, that their fair share should be "equal to or less than you're getting.") So how do these folks do it?