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  • Should Colleges Charge Different Tuition for Different Majors?

    Reacting to to a sharp drop in state subsidies, colleges have opted for selective tuition hikes per undergraduate majors instead of equitable price increases. Does that influence how incoming students select their major? At least one analyst says that does, indeed, appear to be the case.
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  • Oregon Looks at New Ways to Fund College

    While the student debt crisis remains a hot-button issue on a national scale, Oregon lawmakers have come up with a novel idea for funding higher education: Have students pay a small percentage of their salary over the span of many years.
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  • Burgernomics: America Still Tops Big Mac Index

    Americans can buy more McDonald's Big Macs per hour than workers in any other country, according to The Economist's annual (semi-serious) index of purchasing power parity. The news comes just as the WageIndicator Foundation announces that U.S. workers earn the highest hourly wages in the world. That's all well worth celebrating in a month when we patriotically commemorate the nation's birthday.
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  • Are Success and Likeability Mutually Exclusive for Women?

    Is it true that the more successful a man becomes, the more he's liked? And that a woman's success is matched by a correlating decline in likeability?
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  • What Marriage Equality Means for the American Workplace

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  • Women More Engaged Than Men at Work

    A recent poll found that more workers have "checked out" of their jobs mentally, but that women tend to be more engaged at work than men. Part of that might have to do with the fact that women are more likely to take advantage of flex time, which contributes to a person's sense of independence and satisfaction.
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  • Can Technology and Accountability Save Higher Education?

    Higher education in America faces a dilemma. How can we make college more accessible, make sure students learn, make sure they finish their degrees on time and still keep it affordable enough for all socioeconomic levels? At least one study suggests technology and improved accountability measures could be the answer.
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  • How Do We Make College More Accessible?

    The divide between America's rich and poor has grown extensively in the past 30 years, especially for people raising kids. And while the rich have become richer, earnings have declined for the lowest-income echelon. Education can and should be the great equalizer, expanding opportunity for the poor. But how can we improve public policy to ensure that it's accessible to all income levels in an age of skyrocketing tuition costs?
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  • Are Husbands Going Out of Style?

    Way back when, marriage was a necessity for women. They needed a husband to sign for a loan, job security (yes employers looked at marriage status) and, in general, to achieve upward mobility. Now that the union more of an emotional and social connection than an economic partnership, more women eschew holy matrimony in favor of independence. These days, there's just not as much demand for husbands.
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  • What if All the Good Jobs Disappear?

    You spend years acquiring a specialized skill. You go to school, land the coveted internship and then, your professional coming-of-age. You get the gig. After some time in the field, there's some technological breakthrough. It's exciting, historic and ... it puts you out of a job. Sound familiar?
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