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  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Quit Your Job, Become a Social Introvert, and Change Your Attitude
    One of the toughest things about life, both personally and professionally, is that there's only so much you can control. You can't change your nature, for example, and become wildly extroverted if you're someone who draws her energy from within, and you can't necessarily make a bad job into a good one. You can, however, learn to make things better by cultivating certain skills and improving your attitude. And sometimes, you can quit your job and go on to another one -- if you go about things the right way.
  • 5 Inappropriate Workplace Touching Lessons From Joe Biden
    Maybe you're a hugger, or a back-slapper, or -- in your personal life -- a terrible flirt. Chances are, you know that none of this behavior will fly in the office, no matter how innocent your intentions. No one wants to be referred to HR for remedial training or, worse, lose their jobs because they didn't get the memo that it's 2015, and co-workers don't touch each other. In this, we are probably more with the program than many of our leaders in Washington. Take, for example, America's touchy-feeler-in-chief, Joe Biden.
  • 4 Things You Must Do After Your Annual Performance Review
    Your annual performance review is over. Hopefully, you have some new goals to work on and a few pats on the back to keep you motivated. Now what?
  • 10 Tips to Help You Succeed as a New Manager
    Maybe you've been a great individual contributor, and your stellar performance has made management realize your potential and promote you. Or, you just cracked the interview so well, your new employer was willing to take the risk of hiring you as a manager, even though you've not had any people management experience. Either way, you do want to excel in your new role. Here's how.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Wisdom From a Professional Matchmaker, Balancing Work and Marriage, and Learning to Love Yourself
    Wish you felt more passionate about your work? Maybe it's time to make Hallmark's favorite random holiday into a celebration of career love, instead. In this week's very special Valentine's Day edition of PayScale's blog roundup, we have insight into dealing with difficult clients (courtesy of a former professional matchmaker), the financial and emotional risks of starting a business with your own funds, and tips for defeating impostor syndrome.
  • How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love Failure
    Is there anything more useless than fear of failure? It's vestigial, like the tailbone or the appendix. And yet, humans seem to have an ingrained discomfort with the idea that their efforts won't succeed 100 percent of the time. Here's why you should keep fighting against your nature.
  • In Praise of the Office Frenemy
    If you're a reasonable person -- and let's assume that you are -- you probably don't expect to love every single one of your co-workers. On the other hand, unless you're a terrible pessimist, or having a really rough patch in your career, you probably also don't expect to hate them all, either. Now, a new study argues that perhaps your most valuable co-worker is the one who inspires both positive and negative emotions in somewhat equal measure: the office frenemy, if you will. Here's why you need the folks you (occasionally) love to hate.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Nice Guys Finish First, Fixing Work Mistakes, and TMI at Job Interviews
    If you've been on a few job interviews -- or even conducted them yourself -- you know that the most qualified candidate isn't always the one who gets the job. Sometimes, it's a matter of which applicant seems like they'll fit in the best, and sometimes it's just a question of who seems like the person who'd be the most pleasant to have around the office.
  • What We Can Learn From Pete Carroll: How to Explain a Bad Call on the Fly
    The sound you heard yesterday was a cry of anguish going up in the PayScale offices, as the Seahawks lost the Super Bowl at the last possible moment. Offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell called a slant pass that resulted in quarterback Russell Wilson throwing an interception, giving the game to the Patriots ... and spurring a lot of not-even-Monday-morning quarterbacking by critics eager to point the finger at coach Pete Carroll. Carroll's response shows us a lot about how to handle bad calls in our own working life.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Gen Y Can Learn From Farmers, How PT Workers Can Manage Expectations, and Finding Office Space at Home
    Sometimes, the best career advice comes from unexpected places. For example, most office workers wouldn't think to turn to agricultural experts for wisdom -- but maybe they should.
  • 5 Career Lessons From Marshawn Lynch
    The Seattle-based staff of PayScale is pretty excited about Sunday's big game, when the Seahawks will face off against the Patriots in Arizona. But even if you're not a Seahawks fan, chances are that you appreciate their running back, Marshawn Lynch, nicknamed "Beast Mode" for his aggressive style on the field. Off the field, he's become possibly the most quotable player of all time -- while insisting that he's boycotting media. Witness yesterday's press conference, where Lynch said nothing but "I'm just here so I won't get fined." Twenty-nine times.
  • 5 Reasons to Quit Your Job
    No matter how many 200,000-plus job reports the Bureau of Labor Statistics cranks out, the economy is a long way from supporting the decision to quit your job on a whim. But, there are circumstances under which an accelerated plan of departure makes sense. If any of these conditions exist at your job, it's time to start buffing up your resume and calling old co-workers for coffee dates.
  • 7 Networking Tips for Introverts
    Introversion is all too often treated as if it is a curse that afflicts only the most unfortunate members of society. However, while introversion can be the brick wall standing between an individual and his or her dream job, being introverted isn't an employment death sentence.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Making Mistakes, the Mark Zuckerberg Way
    What's the biggest mistake you've made in your career? If you're like most of us, it's not learning from your other errors. This week's roundup looks at what makes moguls like Mark Zuckerberg different from the average person, how exercise can help your career, and whether or not layoffs are as bad for companies as they are for workers.
  • How to Give Negative Feedback
    No one likes negative feedback -- either receiving it, or giving it. In fact, we might hate giving constructive criticism more than getting it; leadership development researchers Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman found that while 92 percent of respondents to a survey valued corrective feedback, most managers felt uncomfortable giving it. Comfort levels aside, it's obviously unlikely for performance to spontaneously improve, without direction from leaders. So what can you do, as a manager, to offer negative feedback that leads to positive results?
  • 21 Pieces of Career Advice We'd Give Our Younger Selves
    If you could go back in time and give your younger self career advice, what's the one thing you'd say? For some, it would be to negotiate a higher salary or start investing more heavily in a 401k. Others might go all the way back to college and follow their dreams -- or pick a career with a better occupational outlook, and fund their personal projects that way.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Don't Stalk the HR Manager
    Sometimes, the job interview process feels like the worst parts of dating. So much depends on having good instincts and good luck, and no matter how clever you are, you're always going to be plagued with at least a little self-doubt. This week's roundup kicks off with advice that will help job seekers avoid overdoing the follow-up after an interview. (Plus: tips on goal setting after your New Year's resolutions fail and more insight into why the gulf between older and younger workers sometimes seems so huge.)
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Make Big Changes, Forget About Self-Sufficiency, and Stay on the Boss's Good Side
    New year, same old career? If you ever needed proof that January 1 is just a day on the calendar, the week after the holidays might provide it. But just because the beginning of a new year isn't automatically a new start at work, doesn't mean that you can't use the fresh page in your planner to inspire you to make changes, large and small, that can make 2015 the best year of your career so far.
  • The 23 Best Pieces of Career Advice Readers Ever Received
    A long time ago -- or maybe it only feels that way -- our careers were at their beginning. Full of promise, ambition, and possibly misplaced self-confidence, we embarked on our journey up the corporate ladder. The luckiest among us received plenty of advice from the wiser and more experienced people in our lives, whether they were our parents, teachers, first bosses, or friends. If we were really fortunate, we were even able to hear it.
  • Fake These 5 Characteristics, and Seem More Confident
    When you feel confident, the people you interact with in your career are more likely to reward you with the things you want, whether it's a job or a promotion or a raise or a parking space closer to the front door. This is potentially pretty unfair, of course, since anyone who's worked with other humans for more than a day knows that confidence isn't always an indicator of competence. So what can you do, if you're deserving, but underappreciated -- and not burdened with an excess of self-regard? Game the system, and fake it until you make it.