• 3 Reasons Why It's Tough to Teach in West Virginia (and These Other States)
    There are a lot of wonderful things about being a teacher, but it's a really difficult job, too. It's a profession that's immensely rewarding and immeasurably challenging all at once, each and every day. It's a job that's always changing – new students, new culture, new curriculum. The pay is relatively low, when measured against what other comparably trained professionals earn, and the hours are very long. (Yes, even when you consider the summer, despite what you might have heard.)
  • Key Results of the 2015 Women In the Workplace Study
    Women in the Workplace, a recent study conducted by and McKinsey & Company – building off of similar work done by the latter in 2012 – examines the current state of women in corporate America. Over 100 companies and nearly 30,000 employees participated. The survey results and accompanying data shed some light on the fact that women are still underrepresented at every level of corporate life, and the study goes a step further, examining the root causes of the problem. Let's take a closer look at a few of the key findings.
  • Why One College Professor Quit His Dream Job
    Oliver Lee, an attorney and assistant professor of history, recently wrote an op-ed for Vox about his decision to leave his tenure-track job in higher education. He did not point the finger at his former employer, the students, or the professors for the problems that led to his resignation. Instead, he says the trouble is systemic, and he calls for reform. Let's take a closer look at some of the issues.
  • Women, Here Are 4 Ways to Stop Giving Away Power
    We're taught from a young age that "femininity" is synonymous with being demure, quiet, pleasing, and friendly. But bosses often need a kind of take-charge attitude that maintains your powerful role as a knowledgeable person. So how do you keep the power and your upward mobility as a woman in the workplace? How do you avoid being stuck between a rock and the glass ceiling? Here are some tips:
  • How to Get These 5 High-Paying, Low-Stress Jobs
    Want a good- or even great-paying job but don't want to join the ranks of the over-stressed? Believe it or not, there are options for you. Recently, Business Insider put together a list of high-paying jobs with lower "stress tolerance" ratings, using data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Occupational Information Network. We looked at what it takes to prepare for some of top jobs on their list.
  • From /r/CareerGuidance: How Do I Apply for an Entry-Level Job ... Before Graduation?
    Picture this: You're in your junior year of pursuing a computer science degree. And one day, while your working your crappy college retail job, it hits you. It's time to get super cereal about your career. But where do you start? How do you apply for an entry-level position? Allow us to explain.
  • Big Meeting? Here's How to Pick the Right Time for It
    Imagine this: you're in charge of planning exactly when to present the Big Proposal to the boss, and you have to pick the location, day, and time for the meeting. You've got a slot on Tuesday at 10 a.m., 3 p.m., or 4 p.m. Which do you choose so that the boss is the most receptive to your ideas?
  • Going Back to an Old Job Isn't the Worst
    Unless you've really burned some bridges, it's possible that you'll eventually return to an old job one day. There are a lot of reasons why this could happen, but it doesn't have to be the most awkward of reunions – or a step backward for your career.
  • Workplace Lulz: Hungry Llamas Are Your Corporate Spirit Animal
    The workplace naturally presents us with many situations to poke fun at. From trying to look productive while secretly texting during a work meeting to that magical feeling when you go on your first business trip, most of us have a career anecdote to share. Online, people sometimes share their experiences via meme. Sit back and laugh at these hilarious workplace gifs with some subtle career advice on the side.
  • The Hidden Rewards of Job Hopping
    What some call moving on, or even moving up, others negatively dub "job hopping." The decision to switch jobs relatively often is controversial. Will a company be willing to hire someone if their resume demonstrates a history of frequent job changes? There could be some downsides to switching jobs fairly often, but there are definitely some significant benefits as well. Let's take a closer look at the potential upsides.
  • Why Most People Quit Their Jobs
    We've all heard sad stories of people quitting jobs to get away from gruesome bosses, unreasonable work hours, or places with weird smells, but in truth, the reasons people quit are often less dramatic – and more positive – than those horror stories might lead us to believe. A recent LinkedIn survey of over 10,000 people around the world found the reasons people quit are pretty universal.
  • The Top 4 Consulting Firms for Work-Life Balance
    Consultants have a reputation for working long hours and traveling a ton. They have to be flexible go-getters who find creative solutions to problems or questions, and put clients at ease during times of stress. Even though a recent study found that many consultants might not be putting in as many hours as they claim, there is no doubt it's a demanding and fast-paced job.
  • Does Money Buy Happiness? Depends on How You Look at It
    If you've ever teetered back and forth trying to figure out whether money could buy you happiness or not, then you're not alone. Choosing a career can often seem like a trade-off between wealth and happiness. Do you take the higher paying job and sacrifice time with your family, or do you choose the job that allows you more freedom and flexibility but warrants a smaller paycheck? See if your answer changes after reading what research has to say about the money-happiness argument.
  • 3 Reasons Not to Stay at Your Job Too Long
    Should you stay or should you go? Typically, job hopping is frowned upon because it suggests that you're flighty and possibly incompetent, thus a waste of money for the employer. Of course, it could also mean that you know what you want and don't want in your career. Here are three reasons why staying at your job for too long may be a career breaker, rather than a career maker.
  • 5 Signs That Now's the Time for Millennial Women to Shine in Their Careers
    Working women continue to be steadfast in their fight for gender equality in the workplace. And, it's paying off, especially for millennials, who now have the greatest support of any generation of women. Here are a few signs that it's time for millennial women to break the glass ceiling once and for all.
  • The 4 Highest Paying Jobs of 2015
    Money isn't everything, but being well compensated for your time and efforts never hurts either. Recently, CareerCast released their list of the highest paying jobs of 2015. Their wage data came from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and they based their ranking on other factors as well including stress, and future income potential. Let's take a look at the four highest paying jobs of 2015.
  • The 5 Five Stages of Wanting to Quit Your Job
    Making the decision to quit your job generally happens gradually, and then all at once. If you're in the midst of making up your mind, the important thing is not to let your emotions get the better of you. It starts with being aware of what's happening during the process. Here's what to expect when you're pondering a jump to bigger and better things – or even just an escape from a dream job that's turned into a nightmare.
  • Do You Have 'Career Compulsive Disorder'?
    Raise your hand if your lunch breaks consist of sitting at your desk, scarfing down food, and pounding away on your keyboard trying to get through emails. Turns out, you're not alone. According to Gallup's Work and Education Survey findings, adults working full-time in the U.S. spend an average of 47 hours per week plugging away at their jobs, and nearly four in 10 say they work at least 50 hours per week.
  • Here's Why You Have Impostor Syndrome (Even Though You Shouldn't)
    Do you feel like a fake? If so, you might be suffering from impostor syndrome, the feeling of intellectual or professional fraudulence that manifests as severe self-doubt. Even when all evidence indicates that they are competent, someone experiencing impostor syndrome can't shake the feeling that they don't know what they're doing professionally, and that soon enough someone is going to find out that they're faking their way through their job and they'll be fired.
  • Your Personality Type Might Affect Your Chances of Getting the Job
    If you've ever been asked to take a personality test as a part of a job application process, you know the strange pressure and confusion it can call up. After all, shouldn't our resume and interview tell our prospective employers everything they need to know about whether or not we're right for the position? These tests make us try to figure out which qualities (and which answers) the hiring team is looking for – and they can leave us wondering if we've hit the mark. Here are a few things you should know about personality tests and the hiring process.

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