• Women, Here Are 4 Ways to Stop Giving Away Power
    We're taught from a young age that "femininity" is synonymous with being demure, quiet, pleasing, and friendly. But bosses often need a kind of take-charge attitude that maintains your powerful role as a knowledgeable person. So how do you keep the power and your upward mobility as a woman in the workplace? How do you avoid being stuck between a rock and the glass ceiling? Here are some tips:
  • How To Tell If People Management IS For You
    Just because you are doing exceptionally in your current job doesn't mean you are ready to take on a managerial position. It also does not mean that your career path is only in the individual contributor career track. You won't really know if you are a good people manager, unless you really start managing a team, but if you have the following traits, that's a great start.
  • How to Keep Your Helicopter Parents From Ruining Your Career
    Helicopter parents are usually the province of parenting blogs and editorials, not so much career blogs like ours. But, the micromanaging doesn't necessarily stop when kids are small – or even when they graduate from college and go out into the world to get a job. If your parents are the helicopter variety, you're probably kind of embarrassed and confused about how to get them to lay off and let you make your own decisions. Worse, you might find yourself without the kind of real-life skills it takes to build your career, manage your finances, and just plain survive. If this is you, don't despair. You can escape the meddling and become independent. Here's how.
  • How to Network Your Way to a New Job
    If you are a job seeker, it pays to look for more than one route to land your job. If you're lucky and if you're a perfect match, applying online directly may be the only thing you ever need to do. On the other hand, if you're stretching to a new role that's slightly beyond your current experience, you might need a little bit of help to get around Applicant Tracking Systems and disinterested recruiters. Knowing someone on the inside sometimes pays.
  • How to Tell If Managing People Just Isn't for You
    You may be an exceptional individual contributor, able to turn around projects in one swift motion, or a subject matter expert, better versed in your area of expertise than anyone else in your office, but neither of those sterling qualities necessarily means you're cut out to manage people.
  • 5 Banned Books That Will Inspire You in Your Career
    Every year since 1982, the American Library Association joins forces with other literary-minded organizations to promote Banned Books Week, a celebration of reading and free speech. Whatever your favorite genre, you're likely to find some example of it on one of the ALA's most-challenged books lists. Also on those lists: plenty of books, classic and otherwise, that can guide, inform, and inspire you to even greater heights in your career.
  • When You Are the Minority at Work
    It's the first day of work and you're meeting with your new team; while it doesn't immediately strike you at first, you realize soon enough that perhaps you are the only person of color, the only man, the only woman, or the only person of a different faith in the room. It's not an easy start, but you will be able to make it work. Here are a few ways you can avoid isolation and any preconceived biases toward you and your efforts.
  • How to Return to Your Old Employer
    You're casually or seriously browsing through open positions matching your skillsets on job sites and suddenly your previous employer pops up on the screen. Or, maybe someone sent you the opening and you're really interested in the role. If you want to explore the opportunity but are hesitant about the next steps, here are a few tips that may help.
  • 5 Good Lessons to Learn From a Bad Job
    Some bad jobs are in the eye of the beholder – for whatever reason, the gig is the opposite of what you hoped you'd be doing at this particular place and time. Other bad jobs are more clearly defined: the pay is barely enough to live on, the duties don't use your skills, education or talents, or the people are just plain mean and unsupportive. Whatever the reason for your discontent, there's some good news hidden in even the worst work experience – bad jobs have a lot to teach you about building your best career, if you know how to look.
  • How to Beat Pre-Interview Nerves
    Interviews can be scary. Go online, and you won't be hard pressed to find a plethora of blog posts, articles and studies on everything from wearing the right outfit to asking the proper questions. Well, add this to the canon. The subject: pre-interview nerves.
  • Baby Might Have Back, But Your Resume Shouldn't Have Any 'Buts'
    My father is a television fanatic — he always has been and likely always will be. Because of that, he often quotes various catchphrases that he finds humorous, attempting to take on the inflections of a specific actor's (or sometimes actress') voice. During the '90s, I was forced to endure countless repetitions of "Did I do that?" (thanks, Mr. Urkel), and before that, there were many, many John Wayne quotes.
  • 3 Career Lessons From Hello Kitty
    Hello Kitty brings in 75 percent of Sanrio's annual $142 million profits, according to analysts, and she's cute as a button, to boot. But even with fame, wealth, and looks, Hello Kitty might not strike you as a model for your own career. (Unless you're Mariah Carey.) Here's what Sanrio's most popular character can teach you:
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! My Helicopter Parents Might Sabotage My Career
    Today's parents are pretty involved in their children's lives – often to a degree that seems excessive to those of us who grew up (or raised kids) in the '70s and '80s and were lucky if we knew we knew what a seatbelt was and that cheese didn't naturally form in pre-packaged single slices. Unfortunately, some of these helicopter parents don't let go once their kids graduate and join the work world. In this week's roundup, we hear from one such adult child, plus get some tips on what recruiters want to see on your resume and how to free yourself from negativity.
  • Jobs to Thrill Your Inner Child: Professional Mattress Jumper
    Using the bedroom mattress as a springboard to the stars is a quintessential childhood pastime. So much so, that the classic nursery song Five Little Monkeys has over 68 million hits on YouTube). As a career path for adults, however, mattress jumping "is not a game," according to Reuben Reynoso, a professional "mattress filler" who has made a career out of jumping on high-end mattresses for McRoskey Mattress Company in San Francisco's Potrero Hill. 
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Ngaio Bealum, Stand-Up Comic/Cannabis Activist/Pot-repreneur
    Sacramento-based standup comic and cannabis reform activist Ngaio Bealum began making waves in the pot industry over 20 years ago, through a combination of entertainment, activism, and pot-repreneurism. As the focus of our latest How I Got My Dream Job profile, Bealum took the time to sit down with PayScale to share insights from a career sprinkled with an illustrious list of occupational credits, including stand-up comic, columnist, movie star, musician, and juggler, to name only a handful. Or, as Bealum puts it more succinctly, "I get paid to smoke weed."
  • Don't Forget About Apprenticeships: Learn While You Earn
    While not everyone wants to work, because most people have to, it logically follows that most of us want a job. The real question is, what's the best way to get one? If you can't afford four years of college, but want a skilled job that pays more than minimum wage, an apprenticeship might be for you.
  • Take a Lesson From Peter Pan to Fight Career FOMO
    Starting your career is no easy task. We all know that college degrees no longer guarantee jobs and that the days of linear career paths and lifetime relationships with employers are just misty-colored memories (almost as dated as that reference I just made). But before you can worry about getting hired, you have to know what you want to get hired to do. Answering that question is becoming more difficult for many millennials, and even some Gen Xers. If your career is in a holding pattern because you can't find your "perfect job," you might be suffering from Career FOMO.
  • Declare Your Independence From Your Employer (But Not the Way You Think)
    First things first: do not quit your job, without having another one lined up. No matter how lousy your current gig feels, being unemployed is almost certainly worse. However, if you really hate your job, and you're trying not to think about the horror show waiting for you back at the office on the other side of this lovely holiday weekend, we have a few tips to make things better today – no new gig required.
  • 'The Best Leap I Ever Took': 10 Career Risks That Paid Off
    Due diligence is important, whether you're taking a new job, making a career change, or starting a business. Sometimes, however, you have to jump and hope for the best. (Hopefully, you know, after some careful planning and building up a cushion of savings to soften your landing.) We asked Facebook users to tell us about the biggest risk they ever took ... and how it made their careers.
  • How Your Brain Can Help (or Hurt) Your Career
    The brain is arguably the most definitively valuable tool to which we have access. If our lives and careers are a ship whose charter is based on a sequence of certain decisions, the brain is the captain steering its course. But how well do we you know it? Probably not very, according to some experts – and an interesting (free) quiz.

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