• Franchise Owners Upset About Seattle's Minimum Wage Laws
    Seattle's new minimum wage of $15 per hour is more than twice the current federal minimum wage of $7.25. Some say businesses will suffer and employers will be unable to hire workers. Franchise owners in Seattle have an additional gripe: many are claiming that franchises are unfairly grouped under the umbrella of large businesses.
  • Where Wal-Mart Is Paying More Than Twice Minimum Wage
    If you need a job making $15 to $20 per hour, would you apply at Wal-Mart? If you live in Williston, North Dakota, you just might. The very fact that a company known for underpaying its workers is offering such wages has started some interesting conversations about minimum wage.
  • Is a Jobless Future a Good Thing?
    As technology advances and takes over menial jobs, will we lose jobs or create new ones? Some experts paint a rosy picture of the future in which society does not need as many jobs as we do today.
  • The Rise of the Permanent Temporary Worker
    For many job seekers, "temporary work" is a bit of an oxymoron. People looking for permanent positions end up taking whatever they can get, which is often a temporary job for an hourly wage, no benefits, and no job security.
  • University President Shares Salary With School’s Lowest Paid Workers
    It’s not everyday that a college president decides to take a $90,000 pay cut for the benefit of low-wage workers. Last week however, Raymond Burse, interim president of Kentucky State University, did just that. His decision sets a new precedent amongst presidents and CEOs to raise the bar on livable wages for employees.
  • How to Manage Your Social Anxiety at Work
    Social anxiety is more than just a disinclination to pack each weekend with parties. For sufferers, the average day at work can be a nightmare of stressful situations and reduced productivity. However, there are ways to manage and overcome this form of stress.
  • Male CEO Steps Down to Spend Time With Family

    When a woman quits her job to spend more time with family, no one bats an eye. When a man does the same, it's news. Earlier this week, Max Schireson announced that he'd be leaving his role as CEO of MongoDB in order to travel less and be at home with his wife and children more. The shock that reverberated throughout the internet is proof, if we still needed any, that men and women have not achieved parity in the business world.

  • Should the US Abolish Tipping?
    The tipping debate rages on. The restaurant industry in the United States relies upon customers tipping for good service in order to pay waiters and waitresses their wages. Servers try to give fast and friendly service in order to be rewarded with additional monies. But does it work?
  • Coder Livetweets Alleged IBM Execs Discussing Why They Won't Hire Women

    Toronto editor and coder Lyndsay Kirkham just wanted to go out to lunch for her birthday. What she got was an earful of mansplanation, courtesy of conversation of the alleged IBM executives at the next table, about why young women are bad hires. (Short version: they keep getting a case of the babies.)

  • Student Loan Bill Introduced by Marco Rubio and Mark Warner
    A bipartisan effort addressing the student loan crisis is underway with new legislation aimed at making payments more manageable and reducing defaults. The Dynamic Repayment Act was introduced in the Senate last week by Senators Marco Rubio (R-Fl.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.). Struggling borrowers are no doubt hopeful about possible relief, but no one should hold their breath. Congress will still have to approve.
  • Microsoft EVP Stephen Elop's Layoff Memo: By the Way, You Might Not Have a Job Next Year

    Yesterday, the hinted-at changes in Microsoft's workforce took shape and heft, to the tune of 18,000 job cuts over the next year. The figure represents about 14 percent of Microsoft's workforce. The majority of those cuts, 12,500 jobs, will come in Microsoft's devices and services unit, which absorbed Nokia last year. How did workers in the mobile unit discover this? In the eleventh paragraph of a memo from former Nokia CEO and current Microsoft executive vice president Stephen Elop.

  • Court Upholds U. of Texas Affirmative Action Policy
    Consideration of race in admissions will continue at the University of Texas per a federal appeals court ruling this week. In a 2-1 vote, the appeals court upheld an earlier district court ruling which found the school’s use of race as a supplemental factor in bringing together a diverse student population to be fair. However, the school's fight to keep affirmative action is not over.
  • The Relationship Between College Graduation, Race, and Time? It’s Complicated

    The race gap has narrowed significantly in college enrollments, with 65 percent of black high school graduates attending college, compared to just under 70 percent of whites in 2011, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. However, the gap in graduation rates remains wide and admission to college has little value if a degree isn’t the end result.

  • Obama Wants Paid Maternity Leave for Working Families
    At the White House Summit on Working Families last month, President Barack Obama said that working families in this country should have paid maternity leave.
  • The Best and Worst States to Be a Working Mother
    Some states offer new parents and families additional protections in the workplace, on top of federal protections. Many, however, do not. How does your state stack up?
  • Wealthy College Presidents May Be the Reason You’re Broke [infographic]

    A recent report released by the Institute for Policy Studies finds that student debt and low-wage faculty labor are rising faster at state universities with the highest-paid presidents. Usually those three hotly debated issues: student debt, increased use of part-time faculty, and inflated executive pay are discussed as separate issues, but researchers wondered if the three were related. What they found shows that all three are connected in ways worthy of a Charles Dickens novel.

  • Women Need to Fall in Love With Computer Science ASAP

    Last month, Google revealed, for the first time ever, just how big the company’s gender gap is. Only 30 percent of Google’s overall employees are women and when looking specifically at tech-related jobs, the number drops to 17 percent. As it turns out, Google isn’t the only tech company with alarmingly low numbers of women.

  • Happy Workers Love Their Mothers

    Did you know your mother follows you to work? Well, she may not actually be following you to your desk, but her influence does. A recent study found that mothers play a unique role in what kind of worker you become. It turns out that a strong relationship with your mom may cause you to be less focused on money, and more focused on finding meaning and purpose in what you do.

  • Another Benefit of a Shorter Work Day: A Better Commute
    The Swedish city of Gothenberg recently rolled out a 6.5-hour work day to some of its municipal workers, in a year-long study aimed at boosting worker productivity and job satisfaction. Over at LinkedIn, Rick Johnson argues that a shorter work day would offer another perk to stressed-out workers: less time on the road, traveling to and from work.
  • Obama May Sign Executive Order Protecting Gay People in the Workplace
    Currently, there is no federal law protecting gays and lesbians against discrimination. Twenty-one states have enacted such protections, but in the remaining 29 states, employers may, for example, fire an employee for being gay.