• Why Don't Americans Believe That Robots Are Coming for Their Jobs?
    The concept of robot overlords taking control of mankind dates back long before Will Smith's 2004 magnum opus I, ROBOT, which is, incidentally, now the name of one of those automatic floor vacuums. In fact, stories of computers ruling humanity date back as early as the 1950s (as commenters who know their Asimov will no doubt point out). But these days, it really isn't science fiction. In fact, Wired reported a study by Oxford University researchers that estimated 47 percent of current jobs in the U.S. could very well be automated inside of the next 20 to 30 years. The scary part is that Americans actually agree for the most part with these findings — they're just in denial that they are the ones on the chopping block.
  • New CareerBuilder Survey Reveals What HR Managers Know About the Gender Pay Gap
    The gender pay gap is a complex issue. In order to begin to understand the situation, it's important to appreciate the difference between what PayScale is calling the controlled and the uncontrolled gender pay gap. Not only do women earn less than men for equal work, they also do different jobs in the first place. The truth about the gender pay gap is that it's much more complicated than some people think.
  • Teachers in South Dakota Will Finally Get a Raise
    Teaching is hard work, but despite the education, dedication, and expertise it demands, teachers are startlingly underpaid compared with other professionals with similar education and training. That's true across the board. However, teachers' pay varies widely state-to-state. This year, South Dakota has decided to take action in order to move their teachers up the pay ranks and help their schools and students succeed. Let's take a closer look at how they'll do it, and what encouraged them toward this action.
  • Sabbaticals Are Good for Workers and Employers
    If you're like most Americans, three things are probably true for you. First, you desperately need a break from your job. You're tired and stressed, and feeling rundown and overworked is typical for you. Second, despite this, you haven't taken a vacation in a while. And, it's not necessarily because you're not entitled – you might have unused vacation days. In that case, you feel that you can't, or shouldn't, get away from the office. You worry that it could hurt business, your individual performance, or even your career standing or trajectory. And finally, if you're like most American workers, you haven't even dared to dream about taking a sabbatical. But, maybe you should. You, and your employer, would be wise to take it under serious consideration. Here's what you need to know.
  • Want Job Security? Avoid These 3 Jobs
    The job market as a whole is showing some good signs of recovery from the Great Recession. But, that recovery hasn't looked the same across the board. It has varied widely by region, for example. Similarly, industries are progressing (or regressing) at different rates. If you're contemplating changing careers – or just want to know whether your current occupation offers a good future – it pays to know which jobs have the highest unemployment rates.
  • The Yelp Open Letter Makes Me Glad Social Media Arrived After I No Longer Knew Everything
    In 2000, I worked for a startup. The name doesn't matter – like most startups, it didn't make it. The important thing, for the purposes of our story, is that I was a recent grad, awe-inspiringly entitled, fairly poor, and perhaps not very good at my job yet. The only thing I had going for me was that there was no social media, so there was no way for me to ruin my reputation with more than, say, three people. In this, I was much more fortunate than Talia Jane, the recently terminated Yelp/Eat24 employee. Jane's open letter to her CEO, which she published on Medium a few days ago, ignited the kind of internet firestorm that's generally reserved these days for arguing about Bernie Bros or Donald Trump. The question, of course, is what to make of her letter and its aftermath. Is she an entitled whippersnapper who doesn't know how to sacrifice, or a voice of her generation pointing out systemic unfairness ... and getting punished for it?
  • 4 Signs That the Job Market Really Is Improving
    The road back from the Great Recession has been a long and winding one, that's for sure. Even when some economic indicators have given us hope, other factors (often the ones that matter most to workers) have lagged behind. For example, despite lower unemployment rates, wage growth has been slow. However, now that the first quarter of 2016 is well underway, there are some indications that the job market might truly be improving. Here's what you need to know.
  • 5 Things You Should Know About Working as a Nurse
    Some people are lucky enough to feel that they have a real calling toward one particular job or career field. Nurses tend to be these kinds of people. If you know someone with a profound desire to help others and a fierce work ethic and intellect to match, they just might work in nursing. But, while the job can be quite fulfilling, it's far from an easy career path. Let's get real about what it's like to work as a nurse in 2016. Here are a few things you should know.
  • Scalia's Passing Likely Means Public-Sector Unions Survive to Fight Again
    Prior to the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court seemed poised to limit the rights of unions to charge non-union members "agency" or "fair share" fees covering the costs of collective bargaining. Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, which came before the Court in January, was by all accounts headed for a 5-4 decision against the unions. Now, with Scalia's death, the vote will likely be split – and revert to the lower court's decision.
  • Is Hillary Clinton Right That Americans Haven't Had a Raise in 15 Years?
    During last night's Democratic presidential debate in Milwaukee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said, "I know a lot of Americans are angry about the economy. And for good cause. Americans haven't had a raise in 15 years. There aren't enough good-paying jobs, especially for young people. And yes, the economy is rigged in favor of those at the top." Rigged economy aside, was she correct in saying that Americans haven't seen an increase in pay since the turn of the last century?
  • The 4 Worst Cities to Find a Job
    The unemployment rate is down for the country at large, but the recovery has been pretty spotty and these rates vary widely state-to-state. It's important that folks looking for work understand the landscape of the current job market, so that they can make the best decisions for their futures. Recently, WalletHub released their report on 2016's Best and Worst Cities to Find a Job.
  • 5 Reasons Why Your Employer Should Embrace Diversity
    Building a diverse company isn't just the right thing to do; according to research from Bersin by Deloitte, it's also pretty good for business. In a recent article for Forbes, contributor Josh Bersin wrote about why smart companies are making diversity and inclusion a top priority. Here's why your employer should be on board.
  • Union Membership by the Numbers
    Labor unions have been in the news quite a bit lately. The Supreme Court is reviewing a case that could mean the end for certain public-sector unions. And, it seems there is some general concern about how these organizations will adapt to a changing economy. So, let's put all of the emotion surrounding the topic of modern trade unions aside and focus on some facts, in order to gain some clarity on the state of today's labor unions.
  • Is Obamacare 'the Biggest Job-Killer in This Country'?
    During last night's seventh Republican debate, Sen. Ted Cruz said: "... we have seen now in six years of Obamacare that it has been a disaster. It is the biggest job-killer in this country. Millions of Americans have lost their jobs, have been forced into part-time work, have lost their health insurance, have lost their doctors, have seen their premiums skyrocket." If elected, he said, he would "repeal every word of Obamacare" – which would be a worthy goal, if Obamacare were really the job-killer Cruz claims it is. But is it?
  • Diversity Talk Makes White Men Anxious, and Other Reasons Diversity Programs Fail
    Diversity in the workplace has been proven to foster innovation and creativity and improve recruitment and retention, and diverse teams are better at solving problems than teams that aren't diverse. Despite all of this, a lot of companies aren't diversifying the way evidence would suggest that they should. Women in the Workplace, a joint study from LeanIn.org and McKinsey, found that women are underrepresented in senior leadership, and a 2014 analysis from Russell Reynolds found that more than 84 percent of board seats in the Fortune 250 are held by people who identify as white. Why aren't companies more diverse, given all we know about diversity's benefits?
  • 4 Legal Decisions That Fell on the Side of Workers in 2015
    Some of the legal decisions that were made in 2015 didn't do much to help workers. For example, Wisconsin was added to the list of Right-to-Work states this year. Many feel that these laws, which change how unions collect fees from the workers they represent, hurt unions and the middle class. In other disappointing news, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Integrity Staffing Solutions vs. Busk case, mandating that companies are not required to compensate workers for the time they spend in security-screening at the end of their shifts – or for any task that's not an "integral and indispensable" part of their job, for that matter. But thankfully, the legal news for workers wasn't all bad this past year. So, let's focus on the good, shall we?
  • Could This Be the Beginning of the End for Certain Public-Sector Unions?
    Labor unions have had a tremendous impact on U.S. workers and workplaces for well over a century. But, it's no secret that unions, in general, are in a bit of trouble these days. And, certain public-sector unions, specifically, could be about to sustain a punishing blow from the U.S. Supreme Court. Let's take a closer look at the case of Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association. Here's what you need to know.
  • Education Is Changing, But Will It Change How We Work?
    Considering how quickly the world is changing, it's actually surprising that the way kids and young adults are educated looks about the same as it has for the last 50 years or more. But just because high-school students still have their days broken down into about eight periods and store their materials in lockers, that doesn't mean that certain aspects of education haven't been updated. Actually, education is changing quite a bit in the U.S. these days, and these changes will have an impact on business and the economy in the years and decades to come. Let's take a look at a few of these shifts and consider how they'll matter in the future.
  • What Would You Be Willing to Do to Eliminate Your Student Loans?
    Student loan debt in the U.S. has reached staggering new heights in recent years, and it's had a huge impact on recent graduates and their families, many of whom are helping to see their children through the trying financial situation they've landed in post-graduation. Student loan debt is now greater than credit card debt in this country, a fact that serves as an excellent reality check about the severity of this problem. The folks shouldering these loans don't need any reminders, though. They are aware every day of the pressure this debt is putting on them financially and otherwise.
  • 4 Reasons Why Your Company Should Give You Paid Leave
    This election cycle, paid family leave has become a major campaign issue, drawing attention to the fact that many other countries mandate paid leave, so why not the U.S.? Critics say laws requiring employers to offer these benefits would hurt small businesses and hamper economic growth. Here's why it's actually in your employer's best interest to give you paid time off, including sick time and family leave.

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