• Paid Parental Leave Continues to Gain Momentum in the US
    Lately, a lot more American companies have been jumping on the paid paternal leave bandwagon and finally offering their employees more paid time off after having a baby. This is great news for working parents in America – because, if you're a working parent, then you know that the struggle is very real. We'll take a look at how some companies in the U.S. are stepping up their paid paternal leave game, even if the country as a whole still lags behind the rest of the world.
  • Generation X Is Shockingly Unprepared for Retirement
    Generation Xers are known for a lot of things. They're cynical, yet entrepreneurial, individualistic, and super tech-savvy. But some fear that, soon, they'll be known for something else – their total and complete lack of planning and preparation for retirement. Here's what you need to know.
  • Want a Job in the Cannabis Industry? Start by Listening to This Podcast.
    The legal marijuana industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the U.S. right now, and a lot of people are wondering how to get involved. If legalization continues to spread throughout more of the 50 states, there will be even more job opportunities and even more folks hoping to secure a piece of the lucrative market for themselves.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 173,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Falls to 5.1 Percent
    Prior to this morning's release from the labor department, economists were predicting the addition of 218,000 jobs. Today's Employment Situation Summary fell well short of that, coming in at only 173,000 jobs. While the unemployment rate fell to 5.1 percent, the labor force participation rate remained close to its 1970s low, at 62.6 percent. It wasn't all bad news, however.
  • 4 Things Educators Should Know About Teacher Shortages
    Education is a field that's ever-changing, as most teachers are no doubt aware. You have to be mighty flexible to be a teacher, rolling with the punches of curriculum changes, priority shifts, and societal/cultural evolutions that make your job feel brand-new each every year. (Sometimes, each and every day.) So, what's new in 2015? Well, teacher shortages, for one thing. Let's take a look at a few points educators should be aware of about this school year's job market.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 190,000 Jobs in August
    This morning's employment report from ADP fell short of economists' expectations, showing the addition of 190,000 jobs to private payrolls. Prior to the release, economists polled by Reuters were predicting 201,000 jobs added. July's report was revised downward to 177,000 jobs from 185,000.
  • The Shocking Reality of Maternity Leave in the US: 1 in 4 Women Take Only 2 Weeks Off
    Two weeks. 14 days. That's the entire length of maternity leave that most American workers take when their child is born. And, it seems some of us are shocked by that fact. After all, we're all protected by the Family and Medical Leave Act, right? Since 1993, the FMLA has ensured 12 work weeks off in a 12-month period, but that doesn't sync up with the reality that nearly 25 percent of women are forced to return to work after two weeks.
  • Women Over 65 Are Twice as Likely to Live in Poverty
    The gender wage gap is a persistent problem that's taking a long time to solve. The fact is that on average, women earn about 78 cents for each dollar brought in by men. And, new data suggest that this is having a significant effect on the state of women's finances in retirement.
  • The 10 Worst States for Student Loan Debt
    The class of 2015 is the most indebted to date, with student loan debt adding up to almost $68 billion total, including federal and private loans. The average graduate will have to pay back $35,000, according to data analysis by Edvisors, and the student loan default rate hovers around 13 to 14 percent. While politicians debate the best way to combat student loan debt, or mitigate its crippling effects, individual students must decide the best way to minimize their debt load. A recent WalletHub report reminds us that where students live can be an important factor in determining how much money they owe – and how quickly they're able to pay it off.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 215,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Unchanged at 5.3 Percent
    After a relatively soft ADP report, tallying the addition of 185,000 jobs to private payrolls in July, this morning's release of the Employment Situation Summary from the labor department is good news. The report, which includes government jobs as well as those in the private sector, showed that total non-farm employment increased by 215,000 jobs last month, just shy of the 223,000 jobs predicted by economists. Unemployment was flat at 5.3 percent.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 185,000 Jobs in July
    Prior to this morning's release of the ADP National Employment Report, economists predicted the addition of 215,000 jobs to private payrolls. The actual number, 185,000, was the lowest since April.
  • Programs That Promise Jobs for Grads Remind Us That a Degree Isn't a Guarantee
    Much of the next election will be centered around which candidate can provide the best path for new jobs and a growing economy. Some candidates have promised 4 percent growth every year. Others say the answer lies in massive government spending on infrastructure repair. Now, a group of U.S. companies has decided not to wait for the next president: they call themselves the 100K Opportunities Initiative.
  • Does the Boss's Gender Change How Men Negotiate Salary?
    Salary negotiation is important. The salary you command at the start of a new job impacts your pay for the remainder of your time with the company, and possibly beyond. Over time, not negotiating can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost pay. Furthermore, people who ask for raises earn more than those who don't. We know that women are less likely to negotiate than men, but gender can also impact negotiation from the other side of the table. Recent research suggests that men negotiate differently when their boss is a woman.
  • More Summer Jobs for Teens, But Do They Want Them?
    The impact of the Great Recession was far-reaching. Although the economy has started to improve in recent years, things aren't the way they used to be. This is true for teens as well as adults. The teen labor force is a complicated matter, with a lot of different factors contributing to the current summer employment reality. Let's take a closer look at a few facts pertaining to summer jobs for teens in 2015.
  • Pope Francis on Work and Workers
    Pope Francis is doing quite a bit of traveling in the Americas during the next few months, and he'll be speaking on a variety of topics along the way. His popularity among both Catholics and non-Catholics in the U.S. is quite high, so the ideas he lays out tend to receive a good bit of coverage. Whatever your faith, it's interesting to consider the ideas the pope has been busy presenting these last few years, particularly his ideas on the topic of work and workers. He'll likely add to these discussions in the months to come. Let's take a closer look.
  • Bored or Broke in Retirement? These Part-Time Jobs Might Be for You
    A few weeks ago, I wrote about how retirees have more education debt than ever. For some, the simple solution is to pay down what you can with your monthly allowance and leave the rest to liquid assets. But for the more determined folk who've left the workforce, coming up with more money after retirement might mean going back to work — at least, part-time.
  • The Debt Project: A Photo Series Worth a Thousand Words
    We think of debt as a negative thing, and in many cases it is. But, not all debt is created equal. Some debt can even be productive. Student loan debt, for example, can still turn out to be a worthwhile investment in some cases. (Check out PayScale's College ROI Report for more specific information.) Owning a home and paying a mortgage builds equity.
  • 4 Ways Finances Affect Women Differently Than Men in Their Careers
    It's a fact. Women are more likely to discuss health issues than financial matters, but the reason why isn't as obvious as you may think. Yes, women tend to be more open about personal stuff than men, but the reason they refrain from money talks is because they feel insecure about their "lack of financial knowledge and experience," and don't know "where to turn for guidance," says a recent study. Let's take a look at four factors that contribute to the financial insecurities that are unique to women in their careers.
  • Jeb Bush: Just Work More, OK?
    Presidential candidate Jeb Bush said that to fix the economy, Americans need to work longer hours. Unsurprisingly, the statement was met with consternation, laughter, and disbelief by some. Hot on the heels, as it is, of the news that wages are stagnant and some out-of-work Americans have simply given up on finding a job, it should also make us all irate.
  • Why the Lower Unemployment Rate Is Bad News
    The unemployment rate has declined to 5.3 percent this month, but no one's planning a parade to celebrate. If you've been keeping up with news on the economy, that might sound crazy. After all, this is the lowest unemployment rate since April 2008, when the recession was first taking hold. Why aren't we cheering in the streets?

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