• 4 Reasons Why Your Company Should Give You Paid Leave
    This election cycle, paid family leave has become a major campaign issue, drawing attention to the fact that many other countries mandate paid leave, so why not the U.S.? Critics say laws requiring employers to offer these benefits would hurt small businesses and hamper economic growth. Here's why it's actually in your employer's best interest to give you paid time off, including sick time and family leave.
  • Why 'Full Employment' Isn't the Whole Picture of the Job Market
    In November, the unemployment rate officially hit 5 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the rate many economists use to mark "full employment." But as Nelson D. Schwartz wrote at The New York Times, "The slack that built up in the labor market after the recession ... has changed traditional calculations of how far unemployment can fall before the job market tightens and the risk of inflation rises." In other words, on economic or personal level, that 5 percent unemployment marker might not mean what it used to mean.
  • The 12 Jobs Projected to Grow 30 Percent By 2024
    Recently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics updated their Occupational Outlook Handbook to reflect projected job growth from 2014-2024. The updated Handbook is essential reading for anyone who's thinking about changing careers in the next few years, and wants to make sure that there are jobs waiting for them on the other side of retraining.
  • Why Unions Need Saving, and Why Millennials Might Be the Best Ones to Do It
    Labor unions have a long history in this country of protecting workers. Unions protect workers' collective bargaining powers and help them negotiate better wages, hours, benefits, job security, and working conditions. However, these days unions are in jeopardy, and it turns out that millennials could be the ones to save them. Let's take a closer look at this issue, beginning by examining some of the reasons why unions are in trouble.
  • Why Your Child Will Likely Live at Home With You Until They're 35
    The Great Recession had an impact on every age group, but there is no doubt that it caused specific challenges for the youngest generation in the workforce, the millennials. After graduating with the highest student loan debt in history, millennials (born between 1980 and 1995) entered the labor market during a time of economic crisis.
  • 4 Surprising Facts About Retirement and How We're Getting Ready For It
    There is no shortage of reminders urging you to prepare for your retirement in advance – even in your 20s, as far in advance as you possibly can. These days, people are also considering other kinds of preparations that go beyond finances. For example, there's a move toward emotionally preparing for retirement, which seems like a good idea since new research has linked depression with retirement, especially for men.
  • 5 Shocking Statistics PayScale Uncovered in 2015
    At PayScale, we really love data. Throughout 2015, we used data to tackle some of the most debated topics in the career world, as well as to shed some light on common misconceptions about data. PayScale's reports cover everything from the gender pay gap to the cost and reward of higher education. And sometimes, we analyze qualitative data, like how workers feel about their jobs. For example, which jobs are the most meaningful, and more importantly, which are the most meaningless? And, do women really only make 78 cents for every dollar a man makes?
  • Why an Improved Economy Doesn't Necessarily Mean Raises for Workers
    There have been a lot of positive signs lately regarding the state of the economy. Perhaps the two strongest indicators are that the unemployment rate is down, and the GDP is up. (This quarter, it rose beyond what was predicted.) Despite this growth, many workers haven't noticed much change to their paychecks. This fact has left a lot of folks wondering: if the economy is improving, why aren't our paychecks doing the same?
  • When Is the Best Time to Negotiate Salary?
    What do entry-level workers and executives have in common? To get the salary they deserve, they both need to negotiate. That's bad news if salary negotiation makes you uncomfortable, but the good news is this: by negotiating pay, you're almost certain to earn more over the course of your career. However, timing is everything, so let's talk a little bit about when to ask for the salary you deserve.
  • Ladies, If We Want Change, We Have to Do It Ourselves
    Women have been fighting for equality for some time now and they show no signs of stopping until the battle has been won, once and for all. Women still face many inequities today that prevent them from reaching their full potential in their personal and professional lives, but it's not only women who are negatively impacted by gender imbalances – business and the economy as a whole suffer when women are deprived of the same opportunities as men. If you want things to change sooner than later, ladies, it's time to take matters into your own hands – because, as Laurel Thatcher Ulrich said, "Well-behaved women seldom make history."
  • The 4 Largest US Endowments and Foundations
    Not sure about the difference between a foundation and an endowment, or why you should care about either? These nonprofit organizations fund education, scientific research, the arts, and healthcare. They have billions of dollars under their control and they invest in a variety of areas from bonds to real estate. Learning more about the largest endowments and foundations in the U.S. can help you understand the impact they have on humanity and the economy. Who knows, you might even want to consider working for one someday.
  • The 4 Worst Cities to Retire
    There may be something of a retirement crisis in America. Due to a strained economy, high education costs, and fewer companies offering retirement accounts to employees, workers are expecting to retire later than they used to. But, for at least a decade, folks have tended to leave their working lives behind sooner than they expected – often due to health problems or some other factor. Now, although the expected retirement age is 66, the average age for making the move is actually 62. The crisis then is pretty clear – a lot of folks are retiring without quite being able to afford to do so.
  • The 4 Best Cities to Retire
    Retirement can be one of the greatest times of our lives, and making smart decisions about how and where to spend those years can make all the difference in the world. You want to retire somewhere safe, somewhere lovely ... plus, wherever you choose needs to have solid healthcare options and, perhaps most importantly, a cost of living that you can afford.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 211,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Holds at 5 Percent
    The monthly Employment Situation Summary, which measures jobs added to both public and private, non-farm payrolls, reflected the addition of 211,000 jobs in November and an unchanged unemployment rate of 5 percent. This was higher than the 200,000 jobs predicted by economists polled by Reuters ahead of the Department of Labor's release. In addition, the previous two month's numbers were revised upward, by +18,000 jobs for October and +8,000 jobs for September, respectively.
  • The Hidden Challenges of Working in 2015 and Beyond
    The words "workplace" and "office" don't conjure up simple imagery quite the way they used to. Some people work for startups that grow and change faster than employees can adjust. Other folks are freelancers or work from home for their companies. Still others are working full-time while also pursuing degrees, and trying to find a way to make it all work. No matter the case, the office life of today is very different than it used to be. And, no matter which work situation you find yourself in, that particular environment has its benefits and its drawbacks. Let's take a closer look at a few of the nontraditional employment situations available to today's workers. There may be more to these arrangements than meets the eye.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 217,000 Jobs in November
    Prior to the release of the ADP National Employment Report for November, economists polled by Reuters were predicting the addition of 190,000 jobs to private payrolls. This morning's report beat expectations and offered some more good news as well: last month's report, which previously reflected the addition of 182,000 jobs, was revised upward to show 196,000 jobs added.
  • Just What Does a 6-Figure Salary Get You?
    Once the definition of success, earning $100,000 or more per year doesn't automatically mean you've made it to easy street these days. As kids in the '80s (or earlier), we might have thought that amount was akin to a million dollars, but now, a six-figure income doesn't mean as much as it used to. What happened? Inflation, for one.
  • Report: Student Jobs Should Build Careers After Graduation
    The financial reality facing today's college students is pretty different than it was decades ago. First of all, the cost of higher education has skyrocketed. The price of attending a private, nonprofit, four-year college, for example, has more than tripled since 1975. And, while the image of the full-time, parent-supported college student who starts working only after completing her degree was never the only reality for students, today's learners must deal with the fact that they can't even hope to work their way through school. Worst of all, perhaps: the student jobs they're likely to find won't boost their careers after graduation.
  • The Cities With the Lowest Unemployment Rates
    A variety of factors contribute to our understanding regarding the current state of the economy. It's not a simple issue. One indicator stands out though as especially significant, at least as far as many working Americans are concerned: unemployment rates. And, this fall, it seems we've been getting some good news.
  • Fact Check: Do Welders Really Make More Than Philosophers?
    If you watched Tuesday's GOP debate on Fox Business, you undoubtedly heard Neil Cavuto tell you that things were really, definitely interesting. And they were: each candidate had ample time to lay out broad details of their economic agenda, and an opportunity to show why theirs was superior to the others. Many times, however, the most interesting thing that was said wasn't a policy issue, but instead anecdotal claims left unchecked by the moderators. In particular, Marco Rubio had some interesting things to say about vocational training.

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