• 4 Signs That the Job Market Really Is Improving
    The road back from the Great Recession has been a long and winding one, that's for sure. Even when some economic indicators have given us hope, other factors (often the ones that matter most to workers) have lagged behind. For example, despite lower unemployment rates, wage growth has been slow. However, now that the first quarter of 2016 is well underway, there are some indications that the job market might truly be improving. Here's what you need to know.
  • 5 Things You Should Know About Working as a Nurse
    Some people are lucky enough to feel that they have a real calling toward one particular job or career field. Nurses tend to be these kinds of people. If you know someone with a profound desire to help others and a fierce work ethic and intellect to match, they just might work in nursing. But, while the job can be quite fulfilling, it's far from an easy career path. Let's get real about what it's like to work as a nurse in 2016. Here are a few things you should know.
  • Is Hillary Clinton Right That Americans Haven't Had a Raise in 15 Years?
    During last night's Democratic presidential debate in Milwaukee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said, "I know a lot of Americans are angry about the economy. And for good cause. Americans haven't had a raise in 15 years. There aren't enough good-paying jobs, especially for young people. And yes, the economy is rigged in favor of those at the top." Rigged economy aside, was she correct in saying that Americans haven't seen an increase in pay since the turn of the last century?
  • The 4 Worst Cities to Find a Job
    The unemployment rate is down for the country at large, but the recovery has been pretty spotty and these rates vary widely state-to-state. It's important that folks looking for work understand the landscape of the current job market, so that they can make the best decisions for their futures. Recently, WalletHub released their report on 2016's Best and Worst Cities to Find a Job.
  • The 4 Best Cities to Find a Job
    The unemployment rate has been steadily improving for a few years now. The latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, a figure we haven't seen since 2008. Although there are still some concerns about whether or not pay is also on the rise, the job market seems to be improving – but not everywhere. When it comes to finding a job, some cities offer more opportunity than others.
  • How to Get Promoted When You Work From Home
    An increasing number of Americans telecommute, at least part of the time. In 2014, 23 percent of the employed population did some or all of their work from home on days that they worked, according to the American Time Use Survey. Technology has freed workers from the need to constantly toil away at the office, but that flexibility is not without its challenges. For one thing, it can be hard to get ahead when the boss never sees your face.
  • 62 People Have as Much Wealth as the Poorer Half of the World's Population
    Worldwide, the rich are definitely getting richer. How bad is it? A recent Oxfam report, An Economy for the 1%, highlights just how stark wealth inequality has grown across the globe. Let's take a look at some of the highlights from the report and learn why the growing gulf between rich and poor is bad for everyone.
  • 5 Reasons Why Your Employer Should Embrace Diversity
    Building a diverse company isn't just the right thing to do; according to research from Bersin by Deloitte, it's also pretty good for business. In a recent article for Forbes, contributor Josh Bersin wrote about why smart companies are making diversity and inclusion a top priority. Here's why your employer should be on board.
  • Are Attractive People Rewarded With Better Grades and Higher Earnings?
    We know that motivation, talent, and maybe a little bit of luck are a great recipe for success, but what if there are other factors at play as well? Does a person's level of attractiveness impact the trajectory of their career? Let's take a look at some of the latest research and information on the topic to discover whether or not attractive people are rewarded professionally for their looks.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 151,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment Dips to 4.9 Percent
    The monthly Employment Situation Summary, released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed the addition of 151,000 jobs to public and private, non-farm payrolls, and an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, the lowest in eight years. Prior to the release, economists were predicting the addition of 190,000 jobs. In a mixed report, however, the real good news is wage growth.
  • Union Membership by the Numbers
    Labor unions have been in the news quite a bit lately. The Supreme Court is reviewing a case that could mean the end for certain public-sector unions. And, it seems there is some general concern about how these organizations will adapt to a changing economy. So, let's put all of the emotion surrounding the topic of modern trade unions aside and focus on some facts, in order to gain some clarity on the state of today's labor unions.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 205,000 Jobs in January
    The ADP National Employment Report beat expectations again this month, reflecting the addition of 205,000 jobs to private payrolls from December to January, according to the payroll processor. Prior to the release of the report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting average gains of 195,000 jobs.
  • Is Obamacare 'the Biggest Job-Killer in This Country'?
    During last night's seventh Republican debate, Sen. Ted Cruz said: "... we have seen now in six years of Obamacare that it has been a disaster. It is the biggest job-killer in this country. Millions of Americans have lost their jobs, have been forced into part-time work, have lost their health insurance, have lost their doctors, have seen their premiums skyrocket." If elected, he said, he would "repeal every word of Obamacare" – which would be a worthy goal, if Obamacare were really the job-killer Cruz claims it is. But is it?
  • What You Need to Know About Obama's Wage Insurance Proposal
    In his State of the Union address earlier this month, President Obama called for "a system of wage insurance" to make sure that Americans who lose their jobs and take new ones for lower wages can still pay their bills. Here's how this plan, should it come to fruition, might affect you.
  • Democratic Town Hall in Iowa: The Candidates' Answers to Questions on Jobs
    As we get closer to the election, the primary races start to feel more like a boxing match. The Democrats are less likely to throw blows at one another than the candidates in the wider Republican field, but they do fall into the kind of media caricatures that feel more appropriate for professional athletes. You can even imagine what would be painted on their boxing robes: Bernie Sanders, the Heart; Hillary Clinton, the Head; Martin O'Malley, the Dark Horse. Last night's CNN Iowa Democratic Presidential Town Hall allowed the candidates to speak slightly more in depth, and try to get beyond the sound bites by answering voters' questions directly.
  • 4 Legal Decisions That Fell on the Side of Workers in 2015
    Some of the legal decisions that were made in 2015 didn't do much to help workers. For example, Wisconsin was added to the list of Right-to-Work states this year. Many feel that these laws, which change how unions collect fees from the workers they represent, hurt unions and the middle class. In other disappointing news, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Integrity Staffing Solutions vs. Busk case, mandating that companies are not required to compensate workers for the time they spend in security-screening at the end of their shifts – or for any task that's not an "integral and indispensable" part of their job, for that matter. But thankfully, the legal news for workers wasn't all bad this past year. So, let's focus on the good, shall we?
  • Fair Pay and Healthcare: 4 Takeaways From the 4th Democratic Debate
    Watching the latest Democratic debate less than a week after the Republican debate, you're immediately struck by the differences between the two parties' events at this stage of the election cycle. It's not just the unsurprising fact that conservatives and liberals disagree on the major issues; it's that the Democrats, who have only three candidates vying for the nomination, have enough time to get into (slightly) more in-depth discussions about their proposals. Barring that, they've at least got more room, both metaphorically and physically on the stage, to argue with one another.
  • Can You Save 1 Percent More This Year?
    Unfortunately, only a very small minority of workers are really saving enough for retirement. In fact, many aren't saving at all. Let's look at a couple quick statistics from a study done this summer by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) to see just how much folks are actually putting away. Here are a few facts.
  • Jobs and Wage Growth in the 6th Top-Tier Republican Debate
    Last night's Republican debate in South Carolina started off with a question about jobs, and the economy and the job market dominated the discussion at many points during the night. Pretty much the only point all the candidates admit to agreeing on is that they disagree with President Obama's assertion, made in the State of the Union address earlier in the week, that the "United States of America, right now, has the strongest, most durable economy in the world."
  • #BigBlockofCheeseDay: Jobs, the Gender Pay Gap, Family Leave, and More
    If you love cheese and you love politics, today is your day on Twitter. OK, fine, the cheese part is just a fun historical reference, wrapped up in a hashtag; Big Block of Cheese Day, first coined on the show The West Wing, dates back to an open house held by President Andrew Jackson in 1837. The reception was Jackson's last in office, and featured a 1,400-pound wheel of cheese and 10,000 guests from the general public. Today, of course, we don't need fromage and an open door to speak to our government directly – we just need Twitter. For the third year in a row, advisors like Vice President Biden and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez took to Twitter to answer the public's questions.

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