• Is the Skills Gap a Myth?

    In a recent Manpower survey, 40 percent of employers said they had trouble finding qualified applicants for open jobs. On the other hand, David Nicklaus at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch points out, we have a 6.2 percent unemployment rate -- better than the recession, obviously, but still "too high in the sixth year of an economic recovery." How can we account for the simultaneous existence of a high unemployment rate and employers who say they can't find workers qualified for jobs?

  • Here's Why Robots Might Not Take Our Jobs

    Robots have been taking jobs from humans for decades now, replacing bank tellers with ATMs, cashiers with self-checkout machines, and factory workers with mechanized assembly lines. The fear, of course, is that the bots will grow so intelligent -- and low-maintenance from a management perspective -- that they'll replace us altogether. In a recent New York Times column, Neil Irwin explains why that might not be as likely as some naysayers predict. Why? For one thing, robots don't have a lot of common sense.

  • Top 10 Careers of the Future [infographic]

    When you think about futuristic jobs, you probably think of something along the lines of robot scientist (which could mean either a scientist who builds robots, or a scientist who is a robot -- either might apply). But the real jobs of the future probably look a bit more familiar.

  • Franchise Owners Upset About Seattle's Minimum Wage Laws
    Seattle's new minimum wage of $15 per hour is more than twice the current federal minimum wage of $7.25. Some say businesses will suffer and employers will be unable to hire workers. Franchise owners in Seattle have an additional gripe: many are claiming that franchises are unfairly grouped under the umbrella of large businesses.
  • Where Wal-Mart Is Paying More Than Twice Minimum Wage
    If you need a job making $15 to $20 per hour, would you apply at Wal-Mart? If you live in Williston, North Dakota, you just might. The very fact that a company known for underpaying its workers is offering such wages has started some interesting conversations about minimum wage.
  • Is a Jobless Future a Good Thing?
    As technology advances and takes over menial jobs, will we lose jobs or create new ones? Some experts paint a rosy picture of the future in which society does not need as many jobs as we do today.
  • Who Are the Underemployed?

    Unlike unemployment, which is easy to define, underemployment is somewhat subjective. What constitutes not having enough work? PayScale's recent report examined three major reasons why people describe themselves as underemployed: not earning enough money, not using education or training, or not getting full-time hours. Any way you slice the data, it's clear that underemployment is a common problem: Over 40 percent of respondents described themselves as underemployed.

  • The Rise of the Permanent Temporary Worker
    For many job seekers, "temporary work" is a bit of an oxymoron. People looking for permanent positions end up taking whatever they can get, which is often a temporary job for an hourly wage, no benefits, and no job security.
  • Should the US Abolish Tipping?
    The tipping debate rages on. The restaurant industry in the United States relies upon customers tipping for good service in order to pay waiters and waitresses their wages. Servers try to give fast and friendly service in order to be rewarded with additional monies. But does it work?
  • Job Growth Hits Higher-Wage Occupations

    The majority of jobs lost during the recession were mid-wage jobs, i.e. jobs paying between $13.83 and $21.13 an hour. As of March 2013, 58 percent of jobs gained during the recovery were low-paying, in industries like food service and retail. But that might be in the process of changing: the past two job reports from the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed increases in higher-paying industries like construction and business and professional services.

  • BLS Jobs Report: 209,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 6.2 Percent

    The economy added 209,000 jobs last month, according to today's Employment Situation Summary, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Unemployment ticked up to 6.2 percent from 6.1 percent in June.

  • ADP Jobs Report: Economy Added 218,000 Jobs in July

    The private sector added 218,000 jobs last month, according to the latest ADP National Employment Report, less than the 230,000 jobs predicted by economists.

  • Wages on the Rise in Some Industries

    Recent data from the Labor Department shows wage growth in several sectors, including construction, retail, and leisure and hospitality. Together with three months of job reports in the 200,000-plus range, could these statistics mean that the economy is headed in the right direction, at last?

  • 40 Percent of American Workers Would Quit, If Not for Health Insurance

    On dark days, when your job gets you down, what stops you from handing in your letter of resignation? For 40 percent of workers, a recent study finds, it's health insurance -- specifically, health insurance that doesn't cost more or provide less than the plan they have through their employers.

  • Student Loan Bill Introduced by Marco Rubio and Mark Warner
    A bipartisan effort addressing the student loan crisis is underway with new legislation aimed at making payments more manageable and reducing defaults. The Dynamic Repayment Act was introduced in the Senate last week by Senators Marco Rubio (R-Fl.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.). Struggling borrowers are no doubt hopeful about possible relief, but no one should hold their breath. Congress will still have to approve.
  • Higher Minimum Wage Correlates With Job Growth
    One of the biggest arguments against raising the minimum wage has been a pay hike's potential impact on job growth. Many business groups argue that employers won't be able to hire more people if they can't offer low wages. However, recent data from the Department of Labor shows that this might not be the case. Twelve of the 13 states that raised their minimum wage since the beginning of the year have experienced more job growth than lower-wage states.
  • Fewer Freshman College Students Returning for Sophomore Year

    The rate of first-time college students returning for their sophomore year in 2013 dropped 1.2 percentage points, compared with the entering class of 2009, according to a new report from The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. The retention rate, however remained about the same, meaning that college students who left school were more likely to drop out entirely, and less likely to leave one school in order to enroll somewhere else.

  • Switching Companies May Earn You More Money

    Loyalty to one employer is no longer the best strategy for most workers, at least in terms of earnings. People who "job hop" and switch companies end up earning higher salaries than those who stick around.

  • BLS Jobs Report: 288,000 Jobs Added
    Any way you look at it, June was a great month for job growth and employment in various industries. Economists are hopeful that this trend will continue.
  • Parents Value Education But Won't Pay for College
    More parents are requiring their children to either take out loans or pay for their college educations out of pocket.