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  • Elizabeth Warren to Education Department: Protect Student Loan Borrowers
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren has been making plenty of headlines over the past few months. Between a grassroots campaign (unsuccessfully) demanding her run for president; a spat with Jamie Dimon, the head of JPMorgan Chase; and the demand for student loan reform, she continues to assert herself as a progressive champion. But is there hard data to vindicate the ideals that have garnered her a cult following?
  • Do Teachers Really Get Summers Off?
    Summer break has rolled in for most school districts by now, and students around the country are celebrating. Teachers too, no doubt. After a long year, they deserve to take a beat and get some rest before gearing up for a new crop of students in the fall. But, do teachers really get summers off? The answer may surprise you. Here are some things to keep in mind about teachers and summer vacation.
  • Pay It Forward: The CEO Giving Employees' Kids a Full Ride to College
    One CEO is taking employee benefits to the next level – the next generation, to be exact. Boxed CEO Chieh Huang is offering to pay college tuition for all of his employees' children as an incentive to remain loyal to the online wholesaler. Seem too good to be true?
  • STEM Is Important, But Let's Not Forget About the Humanities
    There's no doubt that advanced technology is the future, but just because studying STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) can lead to lucrative careers, doesn't mean that business no longer has any use for the humanities. We'll take a look at why society's obsession with STEM is blinding us to the importance of the more human side of business now and in the future.
  • This Is Why So Many New Teachers Quit
    Teacher retention has been a big problem in education for quite some time. Roughly half a million U.S. teachers leave the profession each year, and faculty attrition costs the United States up to $2.2 billion annually, according to a report from the Alliance for Excellent Education. So, why is teacher retention such a persistent and pervasive problem?
  • 7 Surprising Celebrities You Didn't Know Have STEM Degrees
    You probably spend more time Googling your favorite celebs' film credits than their educational credentials, but it's time to give some recognition to celebrities with STEM degrees. The seven celebrities on this list do more than just provide us with mindless entertainment – each of the famous names listed below have earned a degree in a science, technology, engineering, or math subject.
  • 5 Tips for Graduates From Economists
    Graduating from college is an exciting, and simultaneously scary, time in one's life. The future feels open and vast, and the opportunities seem endless yet somehow also slightly out of reach. It's a great time to look to others for advice and guidance in order to make good decisions and move toward a positive next step.
  • The 5 Worst States for Teachers
    Whether you're new to the profession, or a master veteran to the science/art, you probably know that teaching is a very difficult job. The curriculum, rules and regulations, and "best practices" are ever-changing so you can never get too comfortable. The money isn't great – to say the least. Not to mention that, on any given day, the work itself is seemingly endless, very difficult, and largely underappreciated (and/or misunderstood) by society at large.
  • The 5 Best States for Teachers
    Teaching is difficult work. However, some factors (such as compensation and teacher/student ratio) can make a big difference. Recently, WalletHub examined 50 states plus the District of Columbia using 18 metrics in order to determine the best and worst states for teachers.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Talk to Your College Grad About Getting a Job
    What's the difference between guiding and nagging? If you're a parent, the answer probably is, "Depends on the day." There are few times more challenging to parents of grownup kids than the period after graduation, when their newly minted grads head into an unknown future (and possibly back to their childhood bedroom). The challenge, of course, from a parent's perspective, is how to encourage them in their budding career, without driving them nuts. This week, we look at Kelsey Manning's advice for parents of recent grads. Plus: tips for brand-new Twitter users, and how to answer the dreaded question, "Don't you think you're overqualified?"
  • Jon Stewart Comes Clean About His Top-Secret Bootcamp for Vets
    Jon Stewart has long showed his support for soldiers and veterans, even as he's been a vocal critic of the Iraq War. So, it's not a surprise that he's now being credited for a training program to help veterans break into the entertainment industry.
  • 4 Reasons You Don't Need a Formal Mentor
    When you're new to a field, or even just working in a new position, there's a lot to learn. It's useful to have someone to help you understand the ins and outs of the work. And, it's important to be able to get your questions answered when they pop up. A lot of people feel that there are tremendous benefits to participating in a formal mentor/mentee relationship in order to address these needs. However, there might be another way – or even a better way – to meet the same goals. Here are some reasons you might NOT need a mentor.
  • College Seniors Are (Unrealistically?) Optimistic About Their Job Prospects
    It's good to be young. Seeing a wide open future sprawled out before you with plenty of awesome fruit just ripe for picking can make you feel like the possibilities are endless. As we get older, a lot of people become more pessimistic, and even bitter. Actually, Americans are pretty gloomy and doomy about the future in general these days. The optimism of our youth is a good thing. But, when it comes to the job market, is that optimism realistic?
  • 5 Tips for Accepting College Rejections
    It can be really difficult to cope with disappointment when you have your heart set on something. For a lot of young people, the first really big letdown of life comes with being denied by their college of choice. Also, it's common for students to have a difficult time coping with the admissions process when they receive rejection letters from a number of schools. This can make it feel as though plans A-G are out, and a new vision must take shape instead, which is a trying process. All of the disappointment can be really tough to take, but there is a bright side and it's all going to be okay. Here are some tips to help you through.
  • 89 Percent of Minimum Wage Workers are Over 20 Years Old
    Historically, Americans who didn't attend college (or even those that didn't complete high school) had an abundant job market available to them. Working as farmers or factory workers, unskilled laborers still made less than skilled workers, but they were able to make a decent living and, during many times in history, actually secure a middle-class lifestyle for their families.
  • Bernie Sanders Proposes Free Tuition, But Can It Work?
    You've probably already heard about Sen. Bernie Sanders' free-college tuition bill, which that promises a tuition-free education, so students can attend state colleges or universities with little cost. It sounds like a great idea, right? We'd no longer be able to complain about all the uneducated masses. Every student would have access to training to land them a career they'd love, without the burden of crushing student loan debt. Employers would have access to a more highly skilled pool of applicants. Eventually, even the economy as a whole could improve. So why isn't everyone on board?
  • New App Helps to Keep Your Online Image Clean
    Despite partying hard all throughout college, you somehow managed to graduate with decent grades and now you're on your way to paving a successful career path. Your partying days may be behind you now, but that doesn't mean they won't come back to haunt you when you least expect it – for instance, when you're trying to land your dream job. A simple Google search is all it takes for recruiters to dig up every humiliating photo that you've ever been tagged in on Facebook. Well, now a new app aims to prevent your past from ruining your chances of a brighter future.
  • Rise Above the Bottom Line: The Benefits of a Liberal Education
    There's more to life than money. These days, it can be hard to remember that. A lot of people focus on the bottom line – their compensation – when it comes to work. But, if you've ever been miserable at a high-paying job, you know that a big salary isn't always worth the cost. When it comes to education, the same principle applies. There's more to be gained from college than simply training for a high-paying job.
  • The Secret to Getting Into a Great College? Hint: It's Who You Know
    Most prospective students have heard rumors about the effects on favoritism on college acceptance. Now, a new study that surveyed just over 400 admissions officers from the nation's top colleges appears to bolster those accusations, apparently showing that getting into a top-tier college has less to do with academics, and a whole lot more to do with who you know.
  • McMaster University Is Giving Female Employees a $3,515 Raise to Correct for the Gender Wage Gap
    A great deal of research has surfaced lately showing that the gender wage gap remains a persistent problem. But, few organizations are making an effort to identify the extent of the issue in their own business, and make adjustments.