• Could This Be the Beginning of the End for Certain Public-Sector Unions?
    Labor unions have had a tremendous impact on U.S. workers and workplaces for well over a century. But, it's no secret that unions, in general, are in a bit of trouble these days. And, certain public-sector unions, specifically, could be about to sustain a punishing blow from the U.S. Supreme Court. Let's take a closer look at the case of Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association. Here's what you need to know.
  • #BigBlockofCheeseDay: Jobs, the Gender Pay Gap, Family Leave, and More
    If you love cheese and you love politics, today is your day on Twitter. OK, fine, the cheese part is just a fun historical reference, wrapped up in a hashtag; Big Block of Cheese Day, first coined on the show The West Wing, dates back to an open house held by President Andrew Jackson in 1837. The reception was Jackson's last in office, and featured a 1,400-pound wheel of cheese and 10,000 guests from the general public. Today, of course, we don't need fromage and an open door to speak to our government directly – we just need Twitter. For the third year in a row, advisors like Vice President Biden and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez took to Twitter to answer the public's questions.
  • Education Is Changing, But Will It Change How We Work?
    Considering how quickly the world is changing, it's actually surprising that the way kids and young adults are educated looks about the same as it has for the last 50 years or more. But just because high-school students still have their days broken down into about eight periods and store their materials in lockers, that doesn't mean that certain aspects of education haven't been updated. Actually, education is changing quite a bit in the U.S. these days, and these changes will have an impact on business and the economy in the years and decades to come. Let's take a look at a few of these shifts and consider how they'll matter in the future.
  • What Would You Be Willing to Do to Eliminate Your Student Loans?
    Student loan debt in the U.S. has reached staggering new heights in recent years, and it's had a huge impact on recent graduates and their families, many of whom are helping to see their children through the trying financial situation they've landed in post-graduation. Student loan debt is now greater than credit card debt in this country, a fact that serves as an excellent reality check about the severity of this problem. The folks shouldering these loans don't need any reminders, though. They are aware every day of the pressure this debt is putting on them financially and otherwise.
  • What's Next? Teachers Who Change Careers Have Many Options
    Teaching is difficult and interesting work. It can be wonderfully fulfilling and simultaneously almost unbearably frustrating and stressful. Generally, it's not the kids who make teachers want to move on to another profession. Rather, it's something about the system itself, the culture, that eventually adds up to be too much. Some teachers are driven away by the long hours and low pay, others feel they need to move on because of trying relationships with administrators or too much tension with parents. Others find the curriculum, or the accompanying standardized tests, too limiting and confining.
  • Why Your Child Will Likely Live at Home With You Until They're 35
    The Great Recession had an impact on every age group, but there is no doubt that it caused specific challenges for the youngest generation in the workforce, the millennials. After graduating with the highest student loan debt in history, millennials (born between 1980 and 1995) entered the labor market during a time of economic crisis.
  • Could Your Humanities Degree Lead You to a STEM Job?
    If you're a humanities major, chances are you'd never heard of STEM a couple of years ago. The acronym, which stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, entered into the popular consciousness alongside the growth of the industries it's associated with, and as educational programs developed and grew in order to meet the need. There is no doubt that these fields, and the jobs associated with them, are on the rise. Still, although STEM is important, we shouldn't forget about the humanities. Your liberal arts degree might be the perfect background for a job in STEM.
  • The 4 Largest US Endowments and Foundations
    Not sure about the difference between a foundation and an endowment, or why you should care about either? These nonprofit organizations fund education, scientific research, the arts, and healthcare. They have billions of dollars under their control and they invest in a variety of areas from bonds to real estate. Learning more about the largest endowments and foundations in the U.S. can help you understand the impact they have on humanity and the economy. Who knows, you might even want to consider working for one someday.
  • The Hidden Challenges of Working in 2015 and Beyond
    The words "workplace" and "office" don't conjure up simple imagery quite the way they used to. Some people work for startups that grow and change faster than employees can adjust. Other folks are freelancers or work from home for their companies. Still others are working full-time while also pursuing degrees, and trying to find a way to make it all work. No matter the case, the office life of today is very different than it used to be. And, no matter which work situation you find yourself in, that particular environment has its benefits and its drawbacks. Let's take a closer look at a few of the nontraditional employment situations available to today's workers. There may be more to these arrangements than meets the eye.
  • Report: Student Jobs Should Build Careers After Graduation
    The financial reality facing today's college students is pretty different than it was decades ago. First of all, the cost of higher education has skyrocketed. The price of attending a private, nonprofit, four-year college, for example, has more than tripled since 1975. And, while the image of the full-time, parent-supported college student who starts working only after completing her degree was never the only reality for students, today's learners must deal with the fact that they can't even hope to work their way through school. Worst of all, perhaps: the student jobs they're likely to find won't boost their careers after graduation.
  • 5 Free Online Courses to Boost Your Career
    One of the most frustrating things a professional will face in their career is feeling stuck. There comes a point when the competition is steep in your field and the only way to get a leg up is to tack another skill or certification onto your resume. The only problem is: how do you find the time? Read on to learn more about free online courses that can boost your career in little to no time at all.
  • For the First Time Ever, Computer Science Is the Most Popular Major for Women at Stanford
    There's no reason to beat around the bush or sugarcoat it: STEM has a woman problem and it has for a while now. However, here's a bit of good news: Stanford University recently announced that, for the first time in the university's history, computer science is the top major for female students this year. Yeah, you read that right.
  • Don't Believe the Hype: Most College Graduates Feel Their Degrees Were Worth the Cost
    Alarmingly high rates of student loan debt have a lot of people wondering if a bachelor's degree is really worth its cost. Short answer: yes, as long as you pick the right college and the right degree. Sure, college is extremely expensive these days, but don't let that scare you away. Despite everything, there is still a tremendous amount of evidence to support the importance, and the benefits, of attaining a bachelor's. In most cases, it's still totally worth it. Here's why.
  • Obama Proposes a Cap on Standardized Testing
    The debate over standardized testing has been raging for years. The argument escalated in intensity following the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002, which, in addition to other related requirements, mandated yearly testing of every student in all 50 states. Since then, teachers, parents, and students have weighed in with their ideas about whether these tests truly improve the educational system in the U.S. or if they do more harm than good.
  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Offers Employees 52 Weeks Paid Parental Leave
    Who says extended parental leave is just for tech companies like Netflix or Microsoft? The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation recently announced a new parental leave policy of 52 paid weeks for mothers or fathers during the first year after the birth or adoption of a child, plus unlimited time off for all employees.
  • Nontraditional College Students Are the New Normal
    The landscape of higher education is changing. Online learning options, the high cost of tuition, fading tenure programs for professors – today's college experience looks very different than the one students encountered 15 or 20 years ago. But, maybe some of these changes were designed to address what might be the biggest change of all: the change in the students themselves. Let's take a closer look at today's college students in an attempt to get a better sense of how their circumstances and objectives have shifted in recent years.
  • Why One College Professor Quit His Dream Job
    Oliver Lee, an attorney and assistant professor of history, recently wrote an op-ed for Vox about his decision to leave his tenure-track job in higher education. He did not point the finger at his former employer, the students, or the professors for the problems that led to his resignation. Instead, he says the trouble is systemic, and he calls for reform. Let's take a closer look at some of the issues.
  • What Teachers Say About College and Career Readiness
    EdSource, in partnership with the California Teachers Association (CTA), conducted an online survey to find out what teachers feel is the key to career and college readiness and success. The results spoke volumes about what we ought to be providing our next generation of workers, according to the people on the front lines, and about what these students are learning instead. Let's take a closer look.
  • What Everyone Needs to Know About the Seattle Teachers Strike
    This morning, Tuesday, September 15, parents and students across Seattle woke up to the news that there would be no school again today. The teachers in the city are on strike, with huge consequences for families and kids, and for the teachers themselves. But, this strike isn't just about Seattle – it's about the state of the educational system in America, and it's about the way teachers are valued and treated. Here's what you need to know.
  • Here's Why You Have Impostor Syndrome (Even Though You Shouldn't)
    Do you feel like a fake? If so, you might be suffering from impostor syndrome, the feeling of intellectual or professional fraudulence that manifests as severe self-doubt. Even when all evidence indicates that they are competent, someone experiencing impostor syndrome can't shake the feeling that they don't know what they're doing professionally, and that soon enough someone is going to find out that they're faking their way through their job and they'll be fired.

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