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  • Job Training Funds Go to Workers Who Need It Least
    A recent Georgetown University report on employee training trends and spending claims that the least experienced American workers are often the ones who ironically receive the least postsecondary job training from employers and educational institutions. "Employer training trends to be for the most experienced and most educated employees," summarizes lead author Anthony Carnevale of the study's revelations.
  • Hit a Lull in Productivity? Blame Circadian Rhythms
    Have you ever noticed that you hit the wall at work around the same time every day? It's not just because you had a big lunch, or didn't get enough sleep last night. Some times of day are just better for productivity than others. It might have to with our circadian rhythms. Read on to see what times of the day your body and mind are most alert, and when you just need to call it quits.
  • Facebook and LinkedIn Team Up to Help Women in Tech
    The two social network powerhouses, Facebook and LinkedIn, are joining forces to launch programs that will encourage more women to pursue degrees and careers in what has long been a man's world -- the world of tech. Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg (COO) and LinkedIn's Jeffrey Weiner (CEO) are launching mentoring and support programs at colleges to inspire more women to pursue tech-related education in hopes that they will, one day, fill the thousands of job availabilities in the heavily male-dominant tech industry.
  • The Best Teams Have Women on Them
    Working in groups is part of everyday life, both personally and professionally. For instance, a family must work as a unit to maintain an orderly household, and, likewise, professionals must utilize teamwork to accomplish company goals. So, what makes a group successful? One study found the secret ingredient: the more women, the better.
  • 13 Incredible Company Perks
    From fledgling tech start-ups to household-name corporations, employers both big and small are continuously upping the ante when it comes to finding ways to keep their workers happy. While unusually cool perks like Etsy's playground-esque open lofts, or simply invaluable incentives such as the unlimited vacation days offered at Gravity Payments (that's right -- unlimited) might not be the deciding factor in someone's decision to accept a job, they can certainly be a factor. Smart employers know this, and make a point to incorporate additional takeaways into a job offer (besides the opportunity of employment itself). From onsite "Kegerators" to employer-subsidized egg freezing for female employees (seriously), here's a rundown of some of the most interesting perks* currently satisfying employees and enticing potential hires.
  • Credit Reports and Employment: What You Should Know
    Given the rules of your state, your future employer may or may not be able to check your credit report and decide on your candidature accordingly. While experts agree that a bad credit report does not indicate a bad job performance, the practice is still followed by employers much the same way as doing a background/criminal check.
  • 5 Ways to Get Unstuck In Your Career
    As they say, it happens to the bet of us. Getting stuck in your career isn’t the end of the road, it can actually be a hidden opportunity ready for the taking. Here are a few tips to help you get yourself out of a seemingly hopeless career rut and on your way to professional bliss.
  • Unemployment Is Down, So Where Are the Wages?
    If you've been waiting for a fatter paycheck to find you in 2015, so far the news has been discouraging. Unemployment rates are down, which is exciting news, but we still haven't seen an improvement in wages. Here's why a lower unemployment rate hasn't translated to higher pay -- yet.
  • State Supreme Court Hands Down $188M Judgment Against Wal-Mart
    Hot on the heels of the recent Supreme Court decision against Amazon workers, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court just upheld the 2007 judgment for $188 million against Wal-Mart Stores, in Braun v. Wal-Mart Stores. The class action suit affects 187,000 workers, who worked for the company between 1998 to 2006, and centers around Michelle Braun and other Wal-Mart employees, who claimed that they were not compensated for working off-the-clock, as well as through meals and breaks.
  • Choose Your Company Culture Wisely
    Corporate culture affects employee behavior. This goes far beyond working hard to get something turned in because your boss wants it yesterday. People's ethical and personal decisions are based in part upon the values of the organization that employs them. Therefore, consider the culture of a company before you accept a job.
  • What Can Managers Do to Address Workplace Bullying?
    According to a 2011 survey by the Society for Human Resource Management, 51 percent of organizations surveyed reported that there had been incidents of bullying in their workplace. In addition to creating a hostile work environment, bullying affects both victims and witnesses, contributing to continued absences, poor health, self-esteem issues, stress, trauma, and depression – which makes it harder for people to do their best work. Here's how you, as a manager, can prevent bullying and make your office a healthier, happier environment.
  • Why the Container Store Can Afford to Pay Employees the Big Bucks
    The average retail clerk makes a median salary of $28,000 a year across the United States. Employees at the Container Store, however, make an average of $50,000 a year -- nearly twice that. Why would a store pay more than the market rate? It all comes down to CEO Kip Tindell's "one great person equals three good people" rule.
  • 15 Things Working Moms Who Breastfeed Have to Think About (and 4 Tips to Make It Easier)
    Returning to work post-baby poses more problems than a newbie mother might anticipate, especially if she chooses to continue breastfeeding. Here are some tips to help pumping at work not be such a dump.
  • This Job Exists: Professional Writer for Tinder, OKCupid Profiles

    If you have a way with words and yen to help other people make their romantic dreams come true, one Chicago company has the job for you. Virtual Dating Assistants is hiring creative writers to "woo women" on popular dating sites and apps.

  • University President Shares Salary With School’s Lowest Paid Workers
    It’s not everyday that a college president decides to take a $90,000 pay cut for the benefit of low-wage workers. Last week however, Raymond Burse, interim president of Kentucky State University, did just that. His decision sets a new precedent amongst presidents and CEOs to raise the bar on livable wages for employees.
  • How to Return to Work After a Long Leave
    Returning from a long leave could often be overwhelming, both to the employee and the manager. While the employee is anxious about getting back to work, getting up to speed, and readjusting to working life, it is the manager’s responsibility to ensure that the transition is smooth and productive for both the employee and the team.
  • 5 Reasons to Start a Book Club at Work

    We know a lot about our co-workers: what they like to eat and drink, what music they’re into, and what they like to read. In fact, these interests often become the basis of our workplace conversations. Maker of trendy eyewear Warby Parker noted a shared passion for reading amongst employees and decided to make book clubs an official component of the company’s culture. It’s been a win for everyone involved. Here’s why.

  • Do Abusive Bosses Cause Cheating Workers?
    Whatever you do for a living, whether it's crunch numbers or play ball, working under an abusive leader derails morale. There is some evidence that when it gets bad enough, workers cheat and even break the law.
  • Google to Pay for Women, Minorities in Tech to Learn More Code
    There's good news if you’re a woman or minority in tech and work for Google. The tech giant is in the process of "debugging inclusion," which is a geeky way to say that the company is trying to improve their numbers where women and minorities in tech are concerned.
  • Microsoft EVP Stephen Elop's Layoff Memo: By the Way, You Might Not Have a Job Next Year

    Yesterday, the hinted-at changes in Microsoft's workforce took shape and heft, to the tune of 18,000 job cuts over the next year. The figure represents about 14 percent of Microsoft's workforce. The majority of those cuts, 12,500 jobs, will come in Microsoft's devices and services unit, which absorbed Nokia last year. How did workers in the mobile unit discover this? In the eleventh paragraph of a memo from former Nokia CEO and current Microsoft executive vice president Stephen Elop.