• What Nasty Gal Can Teach Us About the Importance of Corporate Culture
    If there's anyone who understands the term "rags to riches," it's Nasty Gal founder Sophia Amoruso, who built an online apparel empire from the ground up. However, according to some current and former Nasty Gal employees, the company's once-vibrant corporate culture isn't what it used to be, thanks to layoffs and restructuring. We'll examine how a company's culture can quickly go south and how to protect yourself from being blindsided in your career.
  • 4 Reasons Why Gen Xers Feel Extra Gloomy
    Generation Xers (born between 1965 and 1980) aren't getting as much attention as they used to. Millennials have increasingly worked their way into the headlines, stealing the show with their confidence (some say, overconfidence), independence, and out-of-the box approach to work, life, family, and just the world in general.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Find Your Own Personal 'Board of Directors'
    One of the toughest parts of transitioning from being a full-time student to a working professional is the lack of framework. All of a sudden, there are no tests, no grades, no clearly defined projects with a beginning, middle, and end. Success is harder to define, and while the sky's the limit, the goal posts can seem to toward the horizon with every step you take. The good news? While your working hours belong to the company, your career belongs only to you.
  • Early Career Success Guide: Don't Forget About the Soft Skills
    Hard skills will help you get the job, but if you want to keep it (and excel) you need soft skills as well. Knowing how to communicate effectively, rebound from a setback, and express commitment to your work will impress the boss, your co-workers, and your company's clients – all of which will make it easier to show off what you can do.
  • Early Career Success Guide: How to Find Meaning at Work
    A 2014 survey by The Energy Project found that workers who find meaning in their work have 1.7 times higher job satisfaction, are 1.4 times more engaged in their jobs, and are three times more likely to stay at their employer. In short, if you want to enjoy what you do – and keep doing it – the most important factor may well be whether or not you find meaning in it. But what if, like many recent grads and newly minted professionals, you don't find much purpose in your 9 to 5? Then, it's time to get creative.
  • How I Got My Dream Job: Carlo Chalisea, Founder/Owner/Chef at Don Lucho's Food Truck
    Carlo Chalisea served Don Lucho's first sandwich off the grill himself in August of 2013. Now, two years later, the 30-year-old Seattle-based chef and entrepreneur is slanging his imaginative Rococo and Aji Amarillo-smothered Chicharron and Lomo Saltado creations to sandwich-loving Seattleites all over town as many as five days a week, and has trouble keeping up with demand even after hiring multiple employees. As one of the only authentic Peruvian food options in an area where the South American country’s cuisine is still largely unknown, the mobile sandwichera, which is named after Chalisea's father, has been growing apace with the local food truck scene as a whole, which exploded following the Seattle City Council’s unanimous vote to allow mobile food vendors to sell on public streets in 2011 (the state’s legalization of recreational marijuana in 2012 couldn’t have hurt things, either). At least some of the sandwich truck’s growth is the result of carving out a unique niche within the city’s larger mobile food community by way of standing gigs at local breweries, which have, like the trucks, been cropping up like wildfire in recent years. Along with this fortuitous strategy, the majority of his savings, and good old fashioned hard work, Chalisea credits Don Lucho’s success to innovative takes on his mom's family recipes, and a passionate dream to bring his Peruvian culture and cuisine to his hometown.
  • Do Millennial Workers Really Job Hop More Often?
    There's nothing more frustrating to a manager than investing in hiring, training, and supporting a new employee, only to have him take off after a couple of months or a year. No wonder, then, that the stereotype of the job-hopping millennial inspires such derision. Who, exactly, do these whippersnappers think they are?
  • Should Offices Have a 'Kids' Table' for Millennials?
    There has always been a generation gap, but thanks to technology, today's gap is wider than it's been since the 1960s. And, this is causing some issues with communication and co-working in offices. Once company thinks it has a unique solution to the problem: a kids' table, just like the one you used to get stuck at during the holidays, aimed specifically at younger workers.
  • How Hollywood's A-List Actresses Fight for Women's Equality
    Who better to bring awareness to a vital cause like women's equality than Hollywood stars? We'll take a look at how some of Hollywood's most revered actresses are speaking out about the inequality women face on- and off-screen, and the role the media plays in perpetuating this unconscious bias.
  • The High Cost of College Is Leaving Many Students Out in the Cold
    College should be one of the most memorable times in a person's life, not a time of financial stress, anxiety, and hopelessness. However, with the rising cost of attending college and student loan debt more than quadrupling over the past two decades, obtaining a degree is proving to be a strain, especially for students who are financially burdened. One group of low-income students from Columbia University is using social media to shed light on the dismal realities of being a poor student in one of the most prestigious and expensive Ivy League schools in the nation, with a Facebook page entitled Columbia University Class Confessions.
  • Hilarious Responses to College Rejection Letters
    For most of us, spring is a happy time; March and April are months signifying the promise of barbecues, blooming flowers, and beach weather. But for the high school seniors around the country racing to their mailboxes every day after school to check for acceptance or rejection letters from their dream schools, March and April are months that will impact the rest of their lives.
  • 3 Things Millennials Want, 3 Things They Could Do Without
    Born between 1980 and 2000, Millennials are the largest generation group in US history, comprising roughly 75.3 million of the nation's population and surpassing even the Baby Boomer generation. Needless to say, it's important to understand how this crowd thinks and functions, seeing the tremendous impact they have on the workplace and how it will evolve in the very near future. Here's a list of three things Millennials want in their lives, and three things they could simply do without … for now.
  • 5 Reasons Why STEM Has a Woman Problem
    How is it that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) companies can find solutions for some of the world's most complex problems, but they can't seem to solve the gender bias issue that keeps women out of STEM careers? According to new research, it's because we, as a culture, don't know that there's even a problem – it's unconscious, and we're all to blame.
  • Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression
    Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.
  • 5 New Career Paths That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago
    The workplace is changing, thanks to new technologies and new ways of thinking about work. If you're looking to venture into semi-uncharted territory in hopes of a brighter career trajectory, then you may want to consider one of these five new careers.
  • What Your Tweets and Posts Tell Recruiters Could Keep You From Getting the Job
    Would you think twice about sharing a mindless "I'm so bored" post on social media if you knew that research shows that people who do so experience higher rates of heart attacks and strokes? What's worse, research that ties social media use to emotional stability/instability is making its way into the hands of people that you probably don't want to be privy to such information: recruiters, hiring managers, and employers. Here's what you need to know about what your social media sharing is saying about you.
  • When It Comes to Job Skills, American Millennials Are in a Race to the Bottom
    The youngest workers, the ones who grew up alongside the latest and greatest technologies, have always been assumed to be more skilled in their use. It's probably been like this since the invention of the typewriter, but it's increasingly true now, in an era when most office jobs rely on digital technologies that adapt seemingly by the minute. In addition, today's young workers are more educated than ever before, boasting more years of education than any previous generation. There's just one problem: recent research shows that Gen Y workers in the U.S. are anything but highly skilled.
  • 5 Tips on Choosing a College: Confessions of an Art School Grad
    By now, we probably all know someone who struggles with student loan debt or job woes. Many of us young folk went to college hoping to make our dreams come true, only to find ourselves saddled with enormous debt and no job prospects. Young grads are still having trouble nailing down that first professional job, and many people aren't working in the industries they trained for. It wasn't exactly a walk in the park for older people either, whose careers went kaput and they had to go back to school or get new training. Stories from the Great Recession are many among us.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup:  Kickstart Your Workday, Career Lessons at Age 23, and Why Cover Letters Still Exist
    How do you start your workday? If you, like many of us, are generally a little bit late, it could be by grabbing the caffeinated beverage of your choice and hurriedly scanning your inbox. But maybe it's time for a reboot.
  • How the Great Recession Changed Millennials' Lives Forever
    It's not easy to "make it" in this country on your own. Every generation has struggled to find their professional path, to gain intellectual, personal, and financial independence, and establish a life for themselves. But, there is no doubt that the latest generation to enter the workforce, the Millennials, has had an especially difficult time getting started.

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