• The Hidden Rewards of Job Hopping
    What some call moving on, or even moving up, others negatively dub "job hopping." The decision to switch jobs relatively often is controversial. Will a company be willing to hire someone if their resume demonstrates a history of frequent job changes? There could be some downsides to switching jobs fairly often, but there are definitely some significant benefits as well. Let's take a closer look at the potential upsides.
  • Cover Letters Probably Don't Matter, But You Still Need One
    The job hunting process occasionally veers into the absurd, requiring job seekers to jump through hoops seemingly for no reason at all. Think of all the times you had to upload a resume into an applicant tracking system ... and then summarize your work experience on the next screen. And, how often have you sat down to write a cover letter, only to come up blank because your resume already includes everything you'd want to say? Well, good news/bad news on that last front, job seekers: a recent survey shows that your disdain for the cover-letter part of job searching is justified. The question is whether you'll ever be allowed to stop writing them.
  • Your Personality Type Might Affect Your Chances of Getting the Job
    If you've ever been asked to take a personality test as a part of a job application process, you know the strange pressure and confusion it can call up. After all, shouldn't our resume and interview tell our prospective employers everything they need to know about whether or not we're right for the position? These tests make us try to figure out which qualities (and which answers) the hiring team is looking for – and they can leave us wondering if we've hit the mark. Here are a few things you should know about personality tests and the hiring process.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: When Is It OK to Lie on Your Resume?
    The longer you're out of work, the less likely you are to get a job. This kind of employment catch-22 leads otherwise honest people to consider some less-than-ethical tactics ... some of them pretty creative. In this week's blog roundup, we look at why lying on your resume is still a really bad idea; plus, how to delegate, and a few tips on getting clearer instructions from your boss.
  • 7 Reasons Why You Should Work at a Startup
    Let me start by saying that working in a startup is a high-risk, high-reward game and not everyone can make that switch. If you click with the employer, the rewards are huge, but if you don't, well … hopefully you've gained something from the experience. If you are willing to take a risk, the learning you gain from the startup can be very enriching.
  • Elevated Careers: eHarmony for Job Seekers
    Online dating services have been around for quite a while now. The most popular,, launched 20 years ago (if you can believe it) and during those years, the public perception of this kind of resource has really shifted. These days, plenty of singles are grateful for the help, and many folks (one in 20 adults) report having met their current partner online.
  • Want a Job in the Cannabis Industry? Start by Listening to This Podcast.
    The legal marijuana industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the U.S. right now, and a lot of people are wondering how to get involved. If legalization continues to spread throughout more of the 50 states, there will be even more job opportunities and even more folks hoping to secure a piece of the lucrative market for themselves.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Should Women Even Bother Negotiating Salary?
    Here's a little controversy to wrap up your week: in her latest blog post, Penelope Trunk argues that women are penalized for negotiating salary, and for this and other reasons, they shouldn't do it at all. Whew. Find that, plus what happens when you don't take a vacation, and the best sites to help you land a job in 2015, in this week's roundup.
  • 3 Career Lessons From Hello Kitty
    Hello Kitty brings in 75 percent of Sanrio's annual $142 million profits, according to analysts, and she's cute as a button, to boot. But even with fame, wealth, and looks, Hello Kitty might not strike you as a model for your own career. (Unless you're Mariah Carey.) Here's what Sanrio's most popular character can teach you:
  • 4 Good Jobs that Don't Require a 4-Year Degree
    It's difficult to make good money without a college degree, and research shows that the gap is widening. According to Labor Department statistics, Americans with a four-year degree earn about 98 percent more per hour than those without one.
  • Want a 'Good' Job? Go to College
    According to a study conducted by Georgetown University, the job market is recovering, at least as far as low-paying and high-paying jobs are concerned. Between 2010 and 2014, the economy created 6.6 million jobs, and 2.9 million "good" jobs — or those that are defined by a median salary of $42,700 per year. The trouble is: 98 percent of those good jobs went to workers who earned at least a bachelor's degree.
  • The Worst Cases of Resume Fakery Hiring Managers Have Ever Seen
    In this job market, a lot of people might feel tempted to exaggerate their experience or credentials on their resumes in order to get ahead. But, lying on your resume is a bad idea – a very bad idea. You'll likely get caught, as hiring managers will seek to verify your claims. Even if by some miracle your lie slips past them, you'll reveal the truth when you start to do the job and your skill set doesn't line up the way it should. No matter how you cut it, outright lying on your resume is not recommended – but that doesn't stop people from trying.
  • Erase These Words From Your LinkedIn Profile Right Now
    We all want to stand out. With more than 100 people on average applying to every job listing out there, it can be hard to make your on-par job skills and drive translate into much more than "I'm the ideal candidate. No, seriously. I'm perfect for this." The problem might be that you're trying too hard to have the perfect profile. In fact, it's so perfect, everyone's saying the exact same thing.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! My Helicopter Parents Might Sabotage My Career
    Today's parents are pretty involved in their children's lives – often to a degree that seems excessive to those of us who grew up (or raised kids) in the '70s and '80s and were lucky if we knew we knew what a seatbelt was and that cheese didn't naturally form in pre-packaged single slices. Unfortunately, some of these helicopter parents don't let go once their kids graduate and join the work world. In this week's roundup, we hear from one such adult child, plus get some tips on what recruiters want to see on your resume and how to free yourself from negativity.
  • Your Cover Letter Might Be Costing You the Job
    Composing cover letters may be one of the most arduous aspects of applying for work, but it seems that they remain a necessary evil. The purpose of the cover letter is to introduce yourself to an organization in the context of the specific job to which you're applying. Cover letters are pointedly aimed toward each potential opportunity, whereas the rest of your application package might be similar to what you use for other job openings. A cover letter can make or break your application, so it's important to avoid certain common pitfalls in order to maximize its benefits.
  • Why People Quit Their Dream Jobs
    With an insanely competitive interview process that can take four to six weeks, include up to eight rounds of interviews, and require responses to seemingly irrelevant questions such as, "How many trees are there in Washington state?," jobs at Amazon and other top tech employers are hard to get. The thought of someone who actually managed to snag a coveted spot with a dream company voluntarily choosing to relinquish said position might sound unfathomable. And yet many people do exactly that.
  • How to Answer the Question, 'What's Your Greatest Weakness?'
    After you've experienced even just a few job interviews, you have a basic idea of what to expect when you sit down across from a potential employer. You'll have a few minutes of small talk, then they'll ask you some questions about your experience and how it applies to the job you're interviewing for. And, at some point in the process, they'll hit you with some version of the familiar question: "What's your greatest weakness?"
  • 10 Things to Do When You Get the Silent Treatment After a Job Interview
    Job interviews can be a lot like blind dates. You walk out of an awesome date thinking that this person is THE one. You've never felt more confident about anything in your life. Then, a couple of days turns into a week without you hearing back from that person, and you find yourself in a dumbfounded, anxiety-ridden tailspin, because you swore it was meant to be. The only thing you can do now is regain composure and figure out how to make sense of all this. Here are a few things to consider so that you can move on from this situation with more confidence and clarity, regardless of the outcome.
  • More Summer Jobs for Teens, But Do They Want Them?
    The impact of the Great Recession was far-reaching. Although the economy has started to improve in recent years, things aren't the way they used to be. This is true for teens as well as adults. The teen labor force is a complicated matter, with a lot of different factors contributing to the current summer employment reality. Let's take a closer look at a few facts pertaining to summer jobs for teens in 2015.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: The Case of the Singing Employee
    What's the weirdest thing you've ever seen at the office? For one manager, it's probably the time a report pulled out a harmonica and started singing his status update. The question, of course: is that OK? And if not, how exactly do you tell your subordinate that this is not the opera episode of Mr. Rogers? All that, plus avoiding student mistakes, and how to accept a job offer the right way, in this week's roundup.

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