• 3 Obstacles That Keep Women From Succeeding in Tech
    The gender pay gap exists across all industries, but it's smallest in tech, according to PayScale's report, The Truth About the Gender Pay Gap. But, that doesn't mean that everything is easy for women at tech companies. Various systemic issues in the industry can keep women from succeeding – or even staying – in STEM fields. Here's what's holding women back.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Update Your LinkedIn Profile (Without Tipping Off the Boss)
    Keeping a job search secret is more complicated these days than not getting busted looking at a job search site on the company time. Part of the problem is that personal brand is so important for job seekers; to show hiring managers and recruiters what you have to offer, you have to keep on top of your social media presence. Of course, nothing tells an employer that you're looking like a freshly updated LinkedIn. So how can you keep your profiles fresh, without making things awkward with your current boss? This week's roundup looks at ways to manage that, plus how to handle rejection during a job search and how to deal with arguably the worst thing about working as a team.
  • 6 Tips for Making Your Co-Workers Like You More
    It's really nice to have friends at work. We spend so much time at the office, it's helpful to have some folks to pal around with while we're there. Plus, we often have a lot in common with the people at work; even if the similarities only boil down to sharing the experience of the job itself. It can be helpful to talk to co-workers about what's going on around the office or even in the industry. Often the people in our personal lives don't really understand, or they're not as interested as co-workers might be.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Your LinkedIn Profile Helping Other People Get Hired?
    Recruiters do not care about you. OK, that sounds harsh. A better way of putting it might be, "Recruiters care about finding stellar candidates, which may or may not include you." The goal when you're buffing up your LinkedIn profile is to make sure that it's driving recruiters toward you, and not toward your friends and colleagues. In this week's roundup, we look at expert advice that will help you tighten up the leaks in your Linkedin, plus how to deal with a toxic work environment, and which questions to ask in order to start off a new job on the right foot.
  • 7 Big Ways Emotional Intelligence Can Help You Get Ahead
    Our resumes and online professional profiles are chock full of pieces of evidence chosen to support and justify our qualifications. But, it turns out that our emotional intelligence (a trait rarely highlighted during the job search process) could be one of the greatest determinants of our professional success. Emotional intelligence is more important that most folks realize. Here's how it helps you at work.
  • Should You Tell Your Co-Workers How Much You Make?
    Americans spend a lot of time at work. It's no wonder that co-workers turn into sincere friends sometimes, given how much we're together. But, there is one topic of conversation that even the closest co-worker buds tend to avoid – discussions of salary. There might be some really good reasons to start talking about it though, despite the fact that money discussion makes us a little uncomfortable. Let's look at this issue a little more closely in order to understand the potential benefits and drawbacks of discussing compensation with co-workers.
  • 5 Reasons Why Your Employer Should Embrace Diversity
    Building a diverse company isn't just the right thing to do; according to research from Bersin by Deloitte, it's also pretty good for business. In a recent article for Forbes, contributor Josh Bersin wrote about why smart companies are making diversity and inclusion a top priority. Here's why your employer should be on board.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: To Be a Strong Leader, Embrace Vulnerability
    When is strength actually a weakness? When it's a facade of toughness, rather than the real deal. This special kind of workplace machismo can keep leaders from asking questions, and when it does, real problems result, both for companies and for the individual who's trying so hard to project strength. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to embrace vulnerability, plus how to get along better with co-workers, and the big mistakes you're probably making on social media, right now.
  • What Your Lunchroom Seating Choice Says About You
    Paying attention to seating choices during a meeting can tell us an awful lot about a group's dynamics. Naturally, the person running the discussion sits in a position of authority, usually at the end of a table or maybe at the center. Key players file in along at the leader's sides and folks whose participation is less critical fill the remaining chairs. We choose our seats at meetings for practical and logical reasons. But, could there also be meaning behind where we sit at other times during the workday? Where you choose to sit in the lunchroom, for example, tells others something about you, and could have an impact on how they see you and maybe even on your career. Let's take a look at some specifics to understand more about lunchroom seating choice.
  • How to Escape Your Own Personal Career Groundhog Day
    Punxsutawney Phil says it's going to be an early spring, and if you heard that in Bill Murray's voice, you are old. Just kidding, youthful Bill Murray superfans – you don't need to have seen Groundhog Day in the theater to appreciate its message. In fact, the movie is such a classic, it was deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant by the United States National Film Registry in 2006, and selected for preservation. What about the film strikes a chord, even 23 years after its release? Well, if you've ever had a terrible job, you probably relate to Murray's character, Phil Connors, a self-absorbed weatherman who's stuck repeating the same day over and over again.
  • Why You Should be Networking … at Work
    The best place for you to get your networking on might be the last place you'd imagine: at your current job. Whether you're just getting started at a new place or you've been there for years, the connections you make at work can benefit your career for years to come. With a strong network, you can reach your career goals faster, and maybe even go out on your own (if that's your thing). So what are you waiting for?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Get Paid for That Snow Day?
    Snow days aren't as much fun for adults as they are for kids, especially if you're not quite sure what inclement weather means for your paycheck. In this week's roundup, we look at who gets paid during snow days and other days off due to inclement weather, plus how to protect yourself from age discrimination on your resume and what to do right after a networking event.
  • How to Avoid Miscommunication at Work
    "The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place," George Bernard Shaw once said. Miscommunication in the workplace is very common. It's a big reason for missed project deadlines, postponed meetings, and misunderstood expectations. For example, maybe your boss expected you to be at work today because your leave was "till" today, but you meant it to "include" today. Sometimes, the communication channel just isn't clear.
  • 3 Reasons You Should Make a Cup of Tea Right Now
    As we start to settle into a brand-new year, the internet is abuzz with tips and tricks for improving your career in 2016. Whether you're into making career resolutions or just setting goals and intentions, this is a great time to reflect and prepare to move forward. But, sometimes the simplest of changes, the gentlest little nudges, can make the biggest difference. Believe it or not, making a cup of tea right now (and maybe regularly from now on) could make a positive impact on your health, happiness, and even your career. Let's take a look at a few reasons why this is the case.
  • What's Next? Teachers Who Change Careers Have Many Options
    Teaching is difficult and interesting work. It can be wonderfully fulfilling and simultaneously almost unbearably frustrating and stressful. Generally, it's not the kids who make teachers want to move on to another profession. Rather, it's something about the system itself, the culture, that eventually adds up to be too much. Some teachers are driven away by the long hours and low pay, others feel they need to move on because of trying relationships with administrators or too much tension with parents. Others find the curriculum, or the accompanying standardized tests, too limiting and confining.
  • 6 Key Supports to Have in Place for a Midlife Career Shift
    Changing careers is more common than you might think. After a time, the excitement and novelty of a job, or even an entire industry, can wear off and we realize we need a change. Perhaps new management or protocol/procedures help to push us toward the decision. Maybe, changing careers (often during our mid-30s to early 50s) is about chasing a dream, old or new; and who needs a better reason than that? For one reason or another, a lot of people decide at some point along the way to shift careers. It can be an exciting and ultimately rewarding choice, but it's important to make the proper preparations before taking the leap. Here are a few key supports to have in place before making a midlife career shift.
  • Lena Dunham and Emma Stone Discuss Nicknames in the Workplace
    Hopefully, it's a rare occurrence these days for a male co-worker or boss to summon a woman at the office with a demeaning nickname like "sweetie," or "honey," or (heaven forbid) "baby." Unfortunately though, it does still happen.
  • 4 Networking Tips For Introverts
    "Networking" is a word that can instantly conjure feelings of dread, particularly for introverted or shy individuals. It doesn't have to be painful, but talking to a bunch of strangers may be nerve-wracking if you feel out of practice or intimidated. Here are four ways to build and enjoy a network that will benefit your career for years to come, even if you aren't the most outgoing of people.
  • The 4 Largest US Endowments and Foundations
    Not sure about the difference between a foundation and an endowment, or why you should care about either? These nonprofit organizations fund education, scientific research, the arts, and healthcare. They have billions of dollars under their control and they invest in a variety of areas from bonds to real estate. Learning more about the largest endowments and foundations in the U.S. can help you understand the impact they have on humanity and the economy. Who knows, you might even want to consider working for one someday.
  • 4 Ways Impostor Syndrome Could Actually Be a Good Thing
    Impostor syndrome is a term used to describe the feeling of professional inadequacy (or even fakery) that exists despite evidence that indicates that the opposite is true. Generally, this "syndrome" is perceived to be a bad thing – as the name itself implies. But, is impostor syndrome all bad? Consider these four reasons why impostor syndrome might actually be a good thing.

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