• How to Enjoy March Madness Without Driving Your Co-Workers Crazy
    March Madness is upon us – whether that's good or bad depends on your feelings about college basketball, your workplace's culture around sports, and your need to get stuff done between now and April 4. Ideally, you and your co-workers would all be able to enjoy the bonding potential of debating the merits of your favorite teams, without turning the office into a locker room or annoying your colleagues who would choose unpaid overtime over courtside seats.
  • America's Corporate Culture Is Too Stuck In Its Ways to Allow Paid Family Leave to Work
    The U.S. is one of the few countries in the world that doesn't mandate any kind of paid family leave, and only 12 percent of private-sector employees in this country have access to it. This is despite the increasing number of elite employers who offer generous perks designed to improve work-life balance. What will it take for paid family leave to truly gain traction in the U.S.? Beyond a law requiring it, we'd need nothing less than a complete cultural shift. Even if paid leave were to be granted tomorrow to every employee nationwide, there's one problem that would still remain: an unsupportive corporate culture that makes it hard to take time away from work to take care of family.
  • What We Can Learn About Meetings From the Rare People Who Actually Enjoy Them
    Complaining about meetings is the unofficial sport of many workplaces. In fact, according to a recent Harris poll, sponsored by the online collaboration company Clarizen, 17 percent of employees said they would literally rather watch paint dry than attend a meeting, and eight percent would rather undergo a root canal. However, every now and again you come across a person, or even a group of people, who actually really enjoy meetings. Maybe we can learn something important about ourselves, or at least about how we collaborate, from thinking about their approach. Here are a few ideas to consider.
  • 4 Useful Work Skills You'd Never Put on Your Resume
    Deciding what exactly to put on your resume can be a daunting experience, and the format doesn't always allow you to give your potential employer the full spectrum of your qualifications. But if you are able get the job, remember that you're expected to bring a lot more to the table than just the skills you listed on your finely curated resume. With that said, here are some of the less-talked-about but absolutely differentiating skills you can learn in order to make yourself stand out from your co-workers.
  • 3 Ways Meditation Could Help You Enjoy Your Job More
    We all have professional goals we're working toward. It's great to be ambitious, strive to be more productive, etc. But, it's also all right, advisable even, to want to enjoy your job more. Deep down, finding greater contentment or even joy from our work is something we all hope for. Sure, mindfulness practices like meditation can help you advance your career, but there are deeper benefits as well. Meditation could actually help you enjoy your job more, too. Here are a few things you should know.
  • Is Your Boss Spying on You at Work?
    It's not an uncommon thing for writers to incite the fear of an impeding Orwellian society in their audience — Big Brother's watching, the NSA is spying, Trump's trumping. But how many of us actually consider the day-to-day ways in which technology has double-crossed our assumed standards of privacy? Back in the day, it has been reported, Bill Gates was able to memorize his employees' license plate numbers to monitor when they came and went. But is such cranial legwork necessary when we've got the internet? Get ready to hit CMD + H: your boss may be watching you.
  • Hiring Managers Share Their Worst Interview Stories
    One of the most challenging parts of the job-search process is the interview. If you're like most people, interviews make you at least a little nervous. And, when we're nervous, we tend to act a little funny. Needless to say, hiring managers have seen their fair share of interviews-gone-wrong.
  • 3 Bad Bosses Everyone Has at Some Point in Their Career
    It's only a matter of time before you get a bad boss. You might have your dream job with your ideal employer, but a bad manager can make you zoom for the door. When that relationship starts to break down, it can lead to dissension, not only between you and your boss, but among your whole team. Instead of fearing that breakdown and chaos, here are ways to combat the bad bosses that are inevitable in your career. (Sorry.)
  • 3 Obstacles That Keep Women From Succeeding in Tech
    The gender pay gap exists across all industries, but it's smallest in tech, according to PayScale's report, The Truth About the Gender Pay Gap. But, that doesn't mean that everything is easy for women at tech companies. Various systemic issues in the industry can keep women from succeeding – or even staying – in STEM fields. Here's what's holding women back.
  • 5 Tips for Overthinking Less and Enjoying Life More
    As busy adults living in our modern culture of overwork, we shoulder a lot of responsibilities, and we feel under a tremendous amount of pressure to attend to all of them properly on a day-in, day-out basis. But, those of us who are prone to overthinking also have to deal with an additional stressor – ourselves.
  • Need to Play Hooky From Work? Learn From the Master
    You may have looked up to Ferris Bueller at one point in your life: a handsome rogue who knows how to bend the rules, get out of school, and put on a decent lip-syncing show. But he's a fictional character. We need a real inspiration, someone like Joaquín García , the man who reportedly didn't go to work for six years while still collecting paychecks. And while the reason he claims he didn't go is because he "couldn't find anything to do," your reason to play hooky might be a lot more serious.
  • How Highly Do You Value a Good Paycheck vs. Mental Well-Being?
    This week on Reddit, Phoenixfighter09 talks to the /f/personalfinance community about his current job situation. Unhappy, stressed out, and exhausted from toxic co-workers, he's debating quitting his job of six months and taking a massive pay cut in hopes of pursuing his real passion while also salvaging his mental health and personal relationships. Should he stick it out or should he quit? Let's unpack the details in this all-too-common scenario.
  • 'Presenteeism' Is Not Your Fault: Why Workers Come to Work Sick
    "If you're sick, stay home." You've heard that from experts ranging from the CDC, to WebMD, to your own mother. If you're lucky, you might even hear it from your boss. Still, many come to work sick, including over half of food service workers. The phenomenon is called "presenteeism," and researchers estimate that it costs employers $150 billion a year – more than either absenteeism or disability. So why do people go to work when they're sick? The reason why is pretty obvious: American workers feel they can't take time off, and a lot of the time, they're right.
  • Does Your Boss Pass the Teacher Test?
    A boss can make or break a job. An excellent leader inspires the entire team toward a shared vision, listens, and builds trust. A not-so-great boss, on the other hand, is the number one reason people quit their jobs.
  • 6 Tips for Making Your Co-Workers Like You More
    It's really nice to have friends at work. We spend so much time at the office, it's helpful to have some folks to pal around with while we're there. Plus, we often have a lot in common with the people at work; even if the similarities only boil down to sharing the experience of the job itself. It can be helpful to talk to co-workers about what's going on around the office or even in the industry. Often the people in our personal lives don't really understand, or they're not as interested as co-workers might be.
  • How to Work With Friends
    It's no secret that we spend a lot of time with our co-workers. In fact, while there's only about a 52 percent chance of us spending 30 hours a week with our family, there's a 91 percent chance we will spend that much time with our co-workers. Like it or not, they're the people that get the most of our time: friendship may very well be inevitable. When you do begin to form those bonds of camaraderie, here's how to keep it from getting weird.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Your LinkedIn Profile Helping Other People Get Hired?
    Recruiters do not care about you. OK, that sounds harsh. A better way of putting it might be, "Recruiters care about finding stellar candidates, which may or may not include you." The goal when you're buffing up your LinkedIn profile is to make sure that it's driving recruiters toward you, and not toward your friends and colleagues. In this week's roundup, we look at expert advice that will help you tighten up the leaks in your Linkedin, plus how to deal with a toxic work environment, and which questions to ask in order to start off a new job on the right foot.
  • 7 Big Ways Emotional Intelligence Can Help You Get Ahead
    Our resumes and online professional profiles are chock full of pieces of evidence chosen to support and justify our qualifications. But, it turns out that our emotional intelligence (a trait rarely highlighted during the job search process) could be one of the greatest determinants of our professional success. Emotional intelligence is more important that most folks realize. Here's how it helps you at work.
  • What Is the Value of Emotional Labor at Work?
    Remembering birthdays, planning the holiday party, showing a new team member around the office and where the best nearby coffee shop is: these are all examples of emotional labor at work. While many happy employees would like to think of themselves as completely willing to take on these seemingly small tasks, more often than not, they fall on female workers. Just as at home, the majority of this type of care and support in the workplace is expected of women in ways it might not be from their male co-workers. What's the impact of such expectation?
  • Do Fun Office Perks Actually Make Workers Less Creative?
    Flashy office perks like ping-pong tables, free backrubs, and unlimited snack foods might help keep you in the office, but do they make you better at your job? Not necessarily. If you're wondering why your creative work environment isn't sparking more innovation, those fancy perks could be to blame. Here's how your cool office could be killing your creativity.

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