• Will You Help Me? Why Some Co-Workers Are More Likely to Say Yes Than Others
    Our interactions around the office, and our relationships with our colleagues, are certainly impacted by the corporate ladder and the rung on which we stand at any given point. Some employees might find themselves behaving a little differently with folks who are a few steps higher in the hierarchy when compared with how they act when they're around those who are a few notches below them. People even email differently when communicating with the top. To some extent, all of this is only natural. Of course interactions with higher-ups are a little different than with others. But, could status impact how willing people are to help each other around the office?
  • Improve Your Focus by Learning to Ignore Things
    Has the following situation ever happened to you? You come home for the weekend with a ton of work that you need to get done before Monday. But, instead of waking up on Saturday morning and getting right to it, you decide you need to clean up a little first instead. By the time the weekend ends, not only is your work done, but your house is clean, your bills are paid, and your taxes are filed as well. In an effort to procrastinate, you actually ended up being highly productive. If this sounds at all familiar, then you know that attention doesn't always work exactly the way we'd like it to, and you'll be interested in some of these tips regarding focus and productivity. Here's what you need to know.
  • 3 Types of Job Stress, and What to Do About Them
    Work-related stress is all too common these days. Although stress levels, overall, have declined in the last few years, 60 percent of Americans surveyed by the American Psychological Association last year reported feeling stressed because of work. The problem is likely to continue as long as our modern culture of overwork persists.
  • 5 Workers on the Best and Worst Parts of Their Commute
    Commuting is expensive, annoying, and might even impact your health. Still, unless we manage to score work-from-home jobs for our whole careers or win the lottery, most of us will wind up doing it at some time or another. Whether our commute stays a minor irritation or becomes a major stumbling block to our happiness in both personal and professional life depends on a number of factors, including personal preference, traffic patterns, and whether we're able to convince the boss to let us have a flexible schedule.
  • Play These 5 Pranks at Work, and You'll Be the April Fool
    Ah, April Fools' Day: the day when some normally sensible professionals regress to high school students targeting a particularly reviled substitute teacher. It's bad enough that the entire internet now teems with fake ad campaigns and bogus products (although we did finally get that Tauntaun sleeping bag, at least). There's no need to compound your co-workers' misery with intra-office April Fools' pranks, as well.
  • Learn to Love Goal-Setting (Yes, Really!)
    Some companies ask all of their employees to set goals at about the same time every year, while others might just bring up the idea of goal-setting during individual performance reviews. Other companies don't talk much about goals at all, but most employees still have them just the same. Thinking about where we want to go next is an important step in helping us grow professionally. But, the process can be kind of a drag. Here are a few tips to help you maximize the experience.
  • Have a Messy Desk? You're in Great Company
    Do you have a messy office? Maybe your co-workers laugh about it a little when they pass by, but you assure them that you can "find anything in a matter of seconds" despite the way things look. Do you sometimes find yourself wondering how or why others manage to keep their spaces so tidy? If you have a messy desk, don't fret. It's not as bad a sign as you, or others, might think. Here are a few things you should know.
  • 4 Possible Surprises From the Offices of the Future
    Of course, no one knows for sure what the future will bring, but that hasn't stopped humans from trying to predict what's to come for centuries. These days, it's especially difficult to speculate about the future because things are changing so quickly. Who knows what will come along next? Still, it's fun to think about. Also, there are also some current workplace trends than can help our guesses veer toward the more educated variety. When thinking about the offices of the future, here are a few wild to semi-wild possibilities to keep on your radar.
  • What You're Twice as Likely to Do When You Telecommute
    Telecommuting is on the rise. As the number of folks who work from home increases, new data begin to emerge about their experience. If you're considering telecommuting at some point in the future, the results of a recent survey should be of interest to you.
  • 5 Emotional Skills Every Worker Should Possess
    If you're looking for work right now, you've probably heard a lot about the importance of developing skills (with technology, for example) as an essential step toward getting hired. But, you may have noticed an awful lot of talk about soft skills, as well. Writing, public speaking, and teamwork are increasingly coveted by employers. High emotional intelligence helps you develop the soft skills on your next employer's wishlist.
  • 4 Tips for Getting Along Better With Your Boss
    If you don't like your boss, you probably don't love going to work every day. In fact, bad managers are the number one reason people quit their jobs. No matter how you feel about your boss now, getting along better could make a big difference to your happiness at work. It makes sense to try to fix this dynamic. Here are a few things to keep in mind to help you build a good relationship with him or her.
  • Planning a Summer Vacation? 5 Reasons to Try for 2 Weeks
    March is about to go out like a lamb, and the blooming flowers and rising temperatures have a lot of people thinking about one thing – vacation. In fact, this is a great time of year to start planning your summer vacation away from the office. Before you submit that time-off request though, here's a thought: can you try for two weeks off?
  • How to Enjoy March Madness Without Driving Your Co-Workers Crazy
    March Madness is upon us – whether that's good or bad depends on your feelings about college basketball, your workplace's culture around sports, and your need to get stuff done between now and April 4. Ideally, you and your co-workers would all be able to enjoy the bonding potential of debating the merits of your favorite teams, without turning the office into a locker room or annoying your colleagues who would choose unpaid overtime over courtside seats.
  • America's Corporate Culture Is Too Stuck In Its Ways to Allow Paid Family Leave to Work
    The U.S. is one of the few countries in the world that doesn't mandate any kind of paid family leave, and only 12 percent of private-sector employees in this country have access to it. This is despite the increasing number of elite employers who offer generous perks designed to improve work-life balance. What will it take for paid family leave to truly gain traction in the U.S.? Beyond a law requiring it, we'd need nothing less than a complete cultural shift. Even if paid leave were to be granted tomorrow to every employee nationwide, there's one problem that would still remain: an unsupportive corporate culture that makes it hard to take time away from work to take care of family.
  • What We Can Learn About Meetings From the Rare People Who Actually Enjoy Them
    Complaining about meetings is the unofficial sport of many workplaces. In fact, according to a recent Harris poll, sponsored by the online collaboration company Clarizen, 17 percent of employees said they would literally rather watch paint dry than attend a meeting, and eight percent would rather undergo a root canal. However, every now and again you come across a person, or even a group of people, who actually really enjoy meetings. Maybe we can learn something important about ourselves, or at least about how we collaborate, from thinking about their approach. Here are a few ideas to consider.
  • 4 Useful Work Skills You'd Never Put on Your Resume
    Deciding what exactly to put on your resume can be a daunting experience, and the format doesn't always allow you to give your potential employer the full spectrum of your qualifications. But if you are able get the job, remember that you're expected to bring a lot more to the table than just the skills you listed on your finely curated resume. With that said, here are some of the less-talked-about but absolutely differentiating skills you can learn in order to make yourself stand out from your co-workers.
  • 3 Ways Meditation Could Help You Enjoy Your Job More
    We all have professional goals we're working toward. It's great to be ambitious, strive to be more productive, etc. But, it's also all right, advisable even, to want to enjoy your job more. Deep down, finding greater contentment or even joy from our work is something we all hope for. Sure, mindfulness practices like meditation can help you advance your career, but there are deeper benefits as well. Meditation could actually help you enjoy your job more, too. Here are a few things you should know.
  • Is Your Boss Spying on You at Work?
    It's not an uncommon thing for writers to incite the fear of an impeding Orwellian society in their audience — Big Brother's watching, the NSA is spying, Trump's trumping. But how many of us actually consider the day-to-day ways in which technology has double-crossed our assumed standards of privacy? Back in the day, it has been reported, Bill Gates was able to memorize his employees' license plate numbers to monitor when they came and went. But is such cranial legwork necessary when we've got the internet? Get ready to hit CMD + H: your boss may be watching you.
  • Hiring Managers Share Their Worst Interview Stories
    One of the most challenging parts of the job-search process is the interview. If you're like most people, interviews make you at least a little nervous. And, when we're nervous, we tend to act a little funny. Needless to say, hiring managers have seen their fair share of interviews-gone-wrong.
  • 3 Bad Bosses Everyone Has at Some Point in Their Career
    It's only a matter of time before you get a bad boss. You might have your dream job with your ideal employer, but a bad manager can make you zoom for the door. When that relationship starts to break down, it can lead to dissension, not only between you and your boss, but among your whole team. Instead of fearing that breakdown and chaos, here are ways to combat the bad bosses that are inevitable in your career. (Sorry.)

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