• How to Avoid the Sunday Night Blues
    Do you feel a creeping sense of doom come Sunday afternoon? You're not alone. According to a international poll, 76 percent of U.S. respondents felt "really bad" Sunday Night Blues. And really, there's a lot to be bummed about: the weekend is ending and the work week is approaching (and hump day is still a long way off). No matter your job, you might feel sad that your personal time is coming to an end again, but there are ways to fight those blahs.
  • Workplace Lulz: When Your Career Is One Big Cat Meme
    Work can be boring, but it doesn't have to be. Each week, I scour the internet to find the most hilarious and trending work-related gems on the internet. From cats to memes and advice animals, here are the best workplace lulz of the week.
  • When You Are the Minority at Work
    It's the first day of work and you're meeting with your new team; while it doesn't immediately strike you at first, you realize soon enough that perhaps you are the only person of color, the only man, the only woman, or the only person of a different faith in the room. It's not an easy start, but you will be able to make it work. Here are a few ways you can avoid isolation and any preconceived biases toward you and your efforts.
  • Do You Have 'Career Compulsive Disorder'?
    Raise your hand if your lunch breaks consist of sitting at your desk, scarfing down food, and pounding away on your keyboard trying to get through emails. Turns out, you're not alone. According to Gallup's Work and Education Survey findings, adults working full-time in the U.S. spend an average of 47 hours per week plugging away at their jobs, and nearly four in 10 say they work at least 50 hours per week.
  • Can You Have Fun at Work?
    When you think of the daily grind, you think of just that: a dull, sometimes tedious place where you clock in and clock out and can't wait to leave every day, right? Man, that's rough. But what if your workplace was fun? People who say you can't have fun at work are not only wrong, their attitude could be keeping their team from being really successful. Here's how to be the change you want to see, whether or not you're officially in charge of morale around the office.
  • 5 Things You Didn't Know About FMLA
    The purpose of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is to help employees balance work and personal or medical needs. It was passed in 1993 during the Clinton administration as a way to protect the jobs of workers who needed to take time off to care for themselves or family members, including babies. (The U.S. is the only industrialized country in the world that does not offer paid maternity leave.) Workers who are contemplating taking leave often find themselves confused about what the FMLA does and doesn't cover. Here's what you need to know.
  • 3 Signs That Your Workplace Is Dysfunctional (and What to Do About It)
    It's hard to say when the "honeymoon period" is over at a new job, but one day you it just hits you: things aren't as good as you thought they were. Now, it's a stretch to get from bad times to toxic times, but sometimes it gets there pretty quickly. Here's how to know if your workplace has gone from bad to the worst ever.
  • Is the Ideal Vacation Even Possible for US Workers?
    Did you take a vacation this summer? Do you wish you could've taken more time off? As fall draws near, so do the feelings, for many, of slight remorse caused by a summer spent mostly indoors, most often at work.
  • 5 Things Kanye West Can Teach Us About Confidence
    Kanye West is a legend. (No, really, he'll tell you that himself). And let's face it, some days you're feeling pretty down and decidedly un-legend like. So how do you dig yourself out of that rut? Even better, how to do gain confidence at work and grab that golden ring? Let's take some tips from Mr. West and start winning some Lifetime Achievement Awards.
  • When It Comes to Work Hours, Less Is More
    A few weeks ago, The New York Times put Amazon's work culture under the microscope . While many employees, both current and past, have chimed in since the article came out, we're now finding time to turn the focus to our own work lives. Should we all strive to be as driven as Amazonians who love their 60-plus hour work weeks? Should we all keep the cube lights on into the wee hours to show how much we "care"? The answer, despite our best efforts to die at our desks, may be "Nope."
  • Should You Brush at Work?
    The biggest lies we tell are to our dentist, right? We're not really brushing after every meal (and flossing, too!). But really, we should be. Inconveniently, that middle meal of the day is sometimes spent at our desks at work, and the only bathroom available is … the communal work bathroom.
  • Find Happiness at Work ... With More Sleep
    If you're burning the midnight oil for work, you're in trouble. All that time at your desk means you're missing out on a key performance ingredient: sleep. Studies show that we're happier when we get more sleep, but how does that translate to the office? You might be surprised.
  • How to Overcome Impostor Syndrome
    Impostor syndrome is a common phenomenon, but that doesn't make it any easier to live with. The humble among us stare into the face of this monster when starting out in a new career or a new job. Others find themselves still stuck in a state of self-doubt years after experiencing real success – wondering how they got here and when others are going to realize that they don't know what they're doing. The fear and anxiety can be uncomfortable to manage, and hold you back personally and professionally. So, instead of wallowing in your imagined fakery, work on overcoming it with these tips.
  • We Are Never Ever Ever Saying These Work Cliches Again
    Make the absurd "business jargon" end now. Let's all stand up, raise our right hands high, and swear that we'll be the change we want to see in the world. Let's all agree that jargon never helps a project get completed, a deadline met, or a co-worker promoted.
  • 5 Tips for Managing Difficult People
    Whether you manage four people or 400, chances are, you consider that part of your job the most challenging. Supporting, training, and motivating others while holding them accountable is tough, even if you work with a dream team. But, when someone difficult enters the mix, it can feel downright impossible.
  • How to Become a Problem-Solver at Work
    We love to complain. In 2013, an article from The New York Times revealed that of customers who bought a product and were dissatisfied with it, 95 percent would not complain to the company, but would express their discontent to 10 or 15 friends. Unless one of those friends was on the quality control team at that company, that probably isn't going to solve any problems for future buyers. We treat our jobs the same way, and unless we learn how to become real problem solvers, it will only hurt us in the long run.
  • Can't Remember Your Last Vacation? You're Not Alone.
    If you have trouble recalling that sand-in-your-toes feeling of a long vacation; you're not the only one. New data shows that a whopping 56 percent of Americans haven't taken a real vacation (one week away from the office) in the last 12 months. What's worse? That’s up from 52 percent in 2012. It's not that we don't need a week away from the grind, it's that we just aren't clocking out. But why?
  • How to Handle an Intern Who Crosses the Line
    The story of Aran Khanna has garnered a lot of attention in recent weeks, as details have surfaced surrounding how and why he lost his prestigious Facebook internship: he created an app that took advantage of a flaw in Facebook's messaging app, allowing him to scrape the location data of any given user (friends or not) and pinpoint their whereabouts within a meter. Though Facebook has known of the flaw for several years, it was Khanna's app's popularity that provoked them to patch it — and the events surrounding his internship have prompted a national debate about Facebook's ability to handle our private data. So why fire him?
  • Could Salary Transparency Close the Gender Wage Gap?
    Little by little, cultural taboos in the U.S. are being eradicated. With each passing generation, we grow increasingly comfortable with discussions that would have stunned those who came before us. However, there is one remaining taboo in our society that is going just as strong as ever: money. We don't talk about money, not with our friends, often not even with our families. And, sharing our salaries with our co-workers? Well, that feels completely out of the question. But, there might be something to gain from talking about pay with our colleagues and getting a little honest with each other.
  • Are Tech Jobs Just Crazy Hard on Workers?
    The short answer is "yes." It's also "no" and "it depends." The recent New York Times critique of Amazon's work culture — the most commented-on piece in the publication's history — has resulted in a firestorm of both backlash and support from the media and tech titans. Former and current Amazon employees have chimed in, sharing views and experiences that both support and negate the Times' claim that Amazon is a company guilty of "conducting an experiment in how far it can push white-collar workers to get them to achieve its ever-expanding ambitions."