ADVERTISEMENT
  • 7 Steps to Up Your Confidence When the Day's Got You Down
    It usually strikes when you least expect it … or on any given Monday. I'm talking about a bad day that just seems to be snowballing into the worst day ever. It's okay, because it happens to the best of us. Here are seven steps to turn that frown upside-down.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Teachers Really Do With Their 'Summers Off'
    If you're a professor, teacher, or grad student, you're probably sick of hearing people say that you get the summer off. But for non-academic types, it seems like a sweet deal. This week's blog roundup looks at why those summer months aren't as much fun for teachers as they are for students; plus, insight into why feedback is so hard on so many of us, and what to do to really drive your co-workers crazy (if that's your goal).
  • Those Open-Plan Office Blues: 7 Horror Stories to Make You Long for Walls
    Ah, open-plan offices. Proponents say they can encourage creativity and collaboration among staff members, while allowing workers flexibility to decide where in the office inspiration is most likely to strike. Of course, open-office boosters generally have another reason to push for them: fewer walls can mean less square footage per person, which equals lower real estate costs. As commenter Meghan C. said, "What bugs me most about open floor plans is imagining The Powers That Be sitting in their @#$% offices saying how great open floor plans are." If you're not a fan of the wall-free office, these tales of woe, collected from Facebook users, will seem pretty familiar.
  • Jeb Bush: Just Work More, OK?
    Presidential candidate Jeb Bush said that to fix the economy, Americans need to work longer hours. Unsurprisingly, the statement was met with consternation, laughter, and disbelief by some. Hot on the heels, as it is, of the news that wages are stagnant and some out-of-work Americans have simply given up on finding a job, it should also make us all irate.
  • 6 Tips to Improve Productivity (When You'd Rather Be on Vacation)
    It can be tough to reach the typical high mark for productivity during the summer months. Sure, you're at work – but another part of you feels distracted by thoughts of home (or maybe the beach) where you envision yourself enjoying the beautiful weather with friends and family.
  • Overtime for Checking Email? Under Obama's Expanded Overtime Rule, Maybe
    Recently, President Obama announced new rules for overtime pay, which will raise the floor to just over $50,000 and cover nearly 5 million American workers. While you may have heard about the rule change, you might not be aware how that could affect your technology usage, particularly checking emails after hours.
  • 4 Essential Tips for a Successful Remote Work Setup
    Many people dream about escaping the drudgery of office life and working from home, but the truth is, remote work has its own kind of drudgery – and some serious challenges. The key to success is understanding and dealing with some of the most common distractions you'll face when working remotely. Here's how to get started.
  • 4 Tips for Enjoying Summer When You're a Busy Grown-up
    Remember summers when you were a kid? We all had different experiences, but whether you spent your summers at camp, fishing with your parents, or lounging around a pool with buddies, chances are we all have one memory in common: free time. At least, before we got old enough for summer jobs.
  • Study Finds Burnout Is the New Normal
    It doesn't take a bevy of research studies to tell us that Americans are working harder than ever. But, how we are processing and managing the stressful pace of our lives deserves a closer look.
  • How Your Brain Can Help (or Hurt) Your Career
    The brain is arguably the most definitively valuable tool to which we have access. If our lives and careers are a ship whose charter is based on a sequence of certain decisions, the brain is the captain steering its course. But how well do we you know it? Probably not very, according to some experts – and an interesting (free) quiz.
  • Rushed and Rude: The High Cost of Busyness
    Discretionary time for adults feels like a thing of the past. How often are most of us able to wake up and decide what to do today? Almost never. It can be difficult to set aside adequate family time, much less time for pure leisure activities, or for ourselves.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: The Real Way to Become a Better Listener
    If you've ever tried to up your listening game, you know it's harder than it seems. It's not a matter of simply cultivating interest in what the speaker is saying, or suppressing the tendency to wait for your chance to talk. This week's roundup includes insight into why you can't become a better listener, just by listening harder – plus, how to improve, the right way, and an explanation of why all those productivity hacks aren't helping you to get more done.
  • Feeling Anxious? Try These 5 Things
    A lot of people struggle with anxiety. It's extremely common actually; over 40 million adults in the US, 18 and older, struggle with it. But, just because anxiety is common, that doesn't make it any easier to cope with when it's happening to you. Thankfully, there are some things you can do to manage or even reduce the strain. Consider these tips.
  • Your Boss Wants You to Be Happy at Work (and That's Bad News)
    The sound you hear is your boss tossing his computer out the window after reading that headline. After all, isn't working for people who care about their employees' feelings a good thing? Before you accuse anyone of being an ingrate, rest assured: individual bosses who care are still a positive. However, as the recently published book The Happiness Industry suggests, the science of "happiness at work" has a dark side, and less to do with your emotional health than your ability to produce, produce, produce.
  • 5 Tricky Ways to Shorten Meetings
    Meetings are a mystery. Everyone claims to hate them, and yet they proliferate on our calendars like Tribbles on Star Trek. The explanations for why that happens are many and varied, including different goals for management and staff, ineffective communication techniques, and just plain old ego. (If you've ever had a boss who loved to hear himself talk, you're familiar with this issue.) Here's how to keep meetings short and get back your time.
  • 5 Tips for Managing, Reducing, and Repurposing Stress
    High levels of stress can be very dangerous, exacerbating existing health problems and even creating new ones. Most Americans report unhealthy stress levels, and 1 in 5 people qualify their stress levels as "extremely high." Even though more than 60 percent of people report that they've tried to reduce their stress in the last five years, more than half, 53 percent, are still trying to meet that goal. In fact, being stressed has become just as American as apple pie – but just because it's common doesn't mean that it's okay.
  • 4 Reasons You Don't Need a Formal Mentor
    When you're new to a field, or even just working in a new position, there's a lot to learn. It's useful to have someone to help you understand the ins and outs of the work. And, it's important to be able to get your questions answered when they pop up. A lot of people feel that there are tremendous benefits to participating in a formal mentor/mentee relationship in order to address these needs. However, there might be another way – or even a better way – to meet the same goals. Here are some reasons you might NOT need a mentor.
  • 7 Tips for Working Outdoors
    The sweet, sunny days of early summer make you want to be outside: go to the beach, work in your garden, do anything that involves fresh air and being away from your desk. There's no month like May for tempting us to be outside as often as we can. You may even feel the urge to do usually indoorsy things outside if you can swing it – like your work. And, why not? Here are some tips for working outdoors.
  • Being Phony at Work Is Affecting Your Career Success
    A Deloitte study that analyzed sociologist Erving Goffman's concept of "covering" found that a whopping 75 percent of American professionals are concealing certain facets of their lives in order to excel in their careers, or so they think. Here's why that does more harm than good for an individual's personal and professional life.
  • Overloaded With Meetings? Here's What to Do
    Like it or not, meetings are a part of working life. Meetings are where decisions are made, projects are allocated, announcements are shared, etc. But that's what an ideal meeting looks like – there's action, and something moves forward. The reality is that not all meetings are really that productive. Some meetings are just a drain on everyone's time and actually get in the way of you performing your job.