• Job Relocation Checklist: Do These 5 Things Before You Move

    The hardest part of moving for work is deciding to take the plunge. Once that's out of the way, you're dealing with details. Of course, how you handle the little things that go into your relocation can make a big difference to your quality of life in your new home and at your new job.

  • How Much Money Do You Need to Make, in Order to Feel Like a Success?

    Whoever said money doesn't buy happiness never tried to pay their mortgage armed with only a positive attitude. Most of us need a certain amount of financial security in order to be satisfied. A recent CareerBuilder survey translates that into dollars and cents: $75,000, it turns out, is the magic number. But this doesn't mean earning that salary will necessarily make all workers feel successful.

  • Should You Share Your Salary With Your Co-workers?

    Salary transparency is hot right now. More companies are revealing what workers make, in the hopes that it will increase trust, improve productivity, even minimize the gender pay gap. But that doesn't meant that sharing salaries is totally without peril for employees.

  • Interviewing for a Job? 4 Tips to Ensure That You Are Not Leaving Money on the Table
    At some point during your interview process, either at the initial screening or during the offer phase, you can expect to hear this question: “What are your salary expectations?” How you handle this question will decide what you earn, perhaps for years to come.
  • First Job? Do These 3 Things for a Bright Financial Future

    If you're just starting out your career, and recently got your first job, you're most likely relieved to be employed. Also, if you've been living like a student -- i.e., on a tight budget -- you might feel rich. (At least until those student loans kick in.) So what should you do first, to make sure that you have the best shot at financial security down the road?

  • Is It OK to Ask About Salary in a Job Interview?

    The conventional wisdom is that it's in a candidate's best interest to delay the salary discussion for as long as they can, both to gather information on the position and its duties and to encourage the hiring manager to throw out the first number. A recent survey from staffing services provider Robert Half, however, indicates that 31 percent of managers are comfortable with applicants asking about compensation and benefits in the very first interview. A further 38 percent say that it's OK on interview number two, and 9 percent will even accept it during the phone screen.

  • Is It Possible to Make Too Much Money?

    Being overpaid is probably not something you've ever spent much time worrying about. After all, real wages are down 7.7 percent, compared with 2006 numbers, and 23 percent of workers were laid off at some point during the recession. Earning too little seems more likely -- and more dire -- than earning too much. So should you even worry about being overpaid, in the first place?

  • How to Negotiate a Job Offer
    You've successfully managed the interview process, and now the employer of your dreams has extended an invitation to join the company. Now comes the tricky part: negotiating the job offer. If the very thought gives you sweaty palms, fear not: a little preparation ahead of time will give you a better chance of getting the salary and benefits you deserve with the least amount of discomfort and risk.
  • Looking for a Raise? Avoid This Mistake

    What's the number one thing people do wrong before asking their boss for a raise? Consultant and executive coach Karen Cates suggests it's failing to ask whether they deserve one in the first place.

  • How to Negotiate Salary When There's No More Money

    You know that you should negotiate salary before taking a new position, lest you leave money on the table and cost yourself hundreds of thousands of dollars in salary over the course of your career. But what about when there's honestly no more room in the budget?

  • Women: To Get a Raise, Try Harder, But Also Softer (Never Mind, Just Be a Man)

    The gender wage gap might be partly explained by women opting into lower-paying professions, but when it comes to negotiating a raise in the career of your choice, a recent New York Times article seems to suggest, your biggest obstacle might be that your boss is a sexist jerk.

  • You Can Discuss Your Salary With Your Co-workers (No Matter What the Boss Says)

    Policies limiting your right to discuss your salary with your co-workers have been a staple of employee handbooks for years. There's just one problem: they're totally illegal.

  • Female Professor Negotiates, Then Loses, Job Offer

    Women routinely fail to negotiate starting salaries and benefits, out of fear that their future employers will think them greedy and rescind the job offer. Most of the time, experts tell us, there's nothing to worry about. And then, every so often, there's a story like this.

  • Do You Have to Give a Salary History During a Job Interview?

    There are many ways for employers to ask candidates about their salary requirements, but perhaps the most-dreaded is to ask for a salary history. These days, you're likely to have had at least one job in your recent past that paid below what you would have asked in better times. So how do you handle it?

  • How to Negotiate Your Salary (Without Being a Jerk)

    Most recruiters expect candidates to negotiate their starting salary, but 41 percent of us don't, losing out on hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of a lifetime. And why don't we negotiate? Well, in part, because we want to seem nice -- at the very least, nice enough to keep the job offer.

  • 3 Ways to Answer 'What Are Your Salary Expectations?'

    It's perhaps the most dreaded question of the interview process. Bid too high, and you could cut yourself out of the running entirely; bid too low, and you'll cost yourself thousands -- perhaps hundreds of thousands -- of dollars over the course of your career. So what's the right answer?

  • Here Is What's Keeping Women From Getting the Raises They Deserve

    Women often don't negotiate, and their reluctance to do so costs them as much as $500,000 over the course of their lifetimes, according one study. The fear of asking for anything -- more money, better perks, time off -- prevents many women from getting what they deserve. So why are they so fearful?

  • 5 Tips That Will Help You Get a Raise This Year

    What would make 2014 better than 2013? If you're like most of us, you'll say, "More money." (No, seriously: we've done research.) Of course, setting your mind on the goal isn't enough to make it happen, all on its own. Here's what you need to do.

  • Use a Precise Number in Salary Negotiation

    Want to get a raise this year, or more money at your new job than you earned at your old one? Research from Columbia Business School suggests that naming a precise, non-round number when negotiating your salary could lead to higher earnings.

  • Why You Shouldn't Negotiate Your Salary

    It's the almost the end of the year, and for many of us, that means performance reviews, and hopefully, raises. But Keld Jensen at Forbes has some controversial advice about negotiating your end-of-the-year raise: as in, don't.