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  • Can You Live on the Minimum Wage in Your State?

    A nifty new tool from The New York Times lets you enter your living expenses, including rent, utilities, food, healthcare, and debt, and figure out if you could get by on the minimum wage in your state. Spoiler alert: you probably can't.

  • 5 Healthcare Jobs That Don't Require a 4-Year Degree

    Over half of the occupations expected to grow by 30 percent or more over the next decade are healthcare professions, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook. Even more significantly for folks without a lot of time or money to devote to retraining, some of them don't require a bachelor's degree for entry. A few are available to folks who only have a high school diploma.

  • Do You Have One of the Hottest Jobs of 2014?
    US News recent released its list of the 100 best jobs of 2014. We will take a look at which jobs are in the top ten, so read on to see if your profession made the cut.
  • Who Wants to Raise the Minimum Wage? The Answer May Surprise You
    Is raising the federal minimum wage rate beneficial to the economy or not? We'll take a look at who's for and against raising the wage and how level of education affects people's opinions.
  • How One 15-Year-Old Girl Is Changing the Future for Women in Business
    A young lady by the name of Adora Svitak wants nothing more than to eradicate the gender inequalities that continue to impede women's progress. We’ll take a look at how this 15-year-old feminist is changing the landscape for women and young ladies in business around the globe.
  • Job Stress Is Killing Your Career and Your Health
    As if you didn't already know, the costs of job stress are high when it comes to both your personal and your professional life. We’ll take a look at what some of the most stressful jobs are in America, and also provide ways to cope with the strain of your 9-to-5.
  • 5 Reasons Why Coding Is a Kid’s Wildest Dream

    Kodable aims at providing children with the tools and resources needed to help them build the knowledge necessary to pick up on any programming language later on in life. But what's so great about coding?

  • Low-Paying Fast-Food Jobs Cost Taxpayers Big Bucks

    Here's a new wrinkle on the debate over what constitutes a reasonable wage for fast food workers: New research from the University of California at Berkeley indicates that the fast food industry costs American taxpayers $7 billion annually, thanks to the fact that 52 percent of fast food workers are forced to rely in part on public assistance.

  • Low Wages Affect Us All, Especially Children
    Almost a quarter of the children living in America are growing up in poverty. Fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King, Jr. marched on Washington to demand jobs and freedom. We still have a long way to go to fulfill King's dream.
  • How Lawyers Bill

    How Lawyers Bill

    Whether you want to work as a lawyer, work for lawyers, or are considering hiring a lawyer, it is good to understand the facts behind how lawyers bill.

  • What's Trending on Twitter - Royal Baby, Nelson Mandela, and Justin Bieber
    This week's Twitter roundup recaps three trending topics that have caused quite a buzz: #RoyalBaby, #NelsonMandela, and #JustinBieber. Read on to find out how the above trending hashtags relate to returning to work after having a baby, being a better leader, and how Justin Bieber's salary makes yours look like chump change. Sorry.
  • PayScale Teams Up With Nokia's JobLens App to Revolutionize Mobile Job Searching
    Good news for job hunters in the UK - the job hunt just got a whole lot easier and more convenient thanks to JobLens, a Nokia mobile app that helps job seekers locate opportunities based on their location and social media networks. The app has partnered with key companies such as Indeed, LinkedIn, and (most importantly) PayScale to make the job search to application process seamless. Learn about this app for a peek into the future of job hunting.
  • During 1998-2000, author Barbara Ehrenreich went undercover as low-wage, unskilled laborer in three different types of jobs. She wanted to experience first-hand just how difficult it is to support oneself as a low-wage laborer.

  • CEO Pay vs. Typical Worker Pay

    We recently released an insightful bit of data that looks at the ratio of pay for Fortune 50 CEOs to the pay of employees at their respective companies. The results are unsettling -- on average the Fortune 50 CEOs earn 213 times more than their workers.

    Who tops the list for the biggest ratio and which CEO earns pay closest to their employees? See the answers below...

  • College is Not Always a Good Investment

    Today, we released our annual study with Bloomberg BusinessWeek on the return on investment (ROI) in education for 691 bachelor's degree granting schools.

    As college costs continue to rise, the justification for paying these costs becomes ever more important. What better justification is there but a measure of their future payoff? In other words, is attending college a good investment in terms of the pay increase it offers over a high school degree?

    The PayScale ROI study helps to answer this question, but the answer is not a simple yes or no. Whether attending college is a good investment or not depends upon many factors, such as the cost incurred, graduation rates at the school, major choice, and the typical pay of the school's graduates.

    In this post I will briefly discuss the methodology of the study, how it changed from last year, and some key insights from the data.

    Whether you went to college or not, are you earning what you are worth? Find out with a free PayScale salary report.

  • PayScale Index: What is an Index Anyway?

    We at PayScale recently released the Q4 2010 results for the PayScale Index. See a previous blog post describing the Index and another one that compares the PayScale Index to other common measures of labor market health.

    However, a common question posed by our readers in response to our release was, "What is an Index?" Or in other words, "What do the numerical values actually measure?"

    In simple terms, an index tracks changes in a variable from some baseline time period. In terms of the PayScale Index, the variable we are tracking is the total cash compensation for full-time private industry employees in the U.S and the baseline year is 2006.

    In this post I will further discuss what an index measures, how it is calculated and compare the PayScale Index to another commonly used index, the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

    Understanding how we measure changes in compensation over time is interesting, but so is understanding your place in the current labor market. Find out where you are with a free PayScale salary report.

  • The PayScale Index: Are Wages Going Up or Down?

    Today PayScale released the Q4 2010 results for the PayScale Index. For people who missed our first release in October, and my blog post describing the PayScale Index, the PayScale Index tracks how the market price of private sector full-time employees, as represented by the wages they are paid, changes over time.

    In this post, I'll look at our results for 2010, and then compare the PayScale Index with three common measures of labor market health: the Unemployment Rate, median Usual Weekly Earnings, and the Employment Cost Index. While each is different from the PayScale Index, they are all trying to get at the same thing: how is the labor market in the US doing?

    National trends are interesting, but what is your market price? In about 5 minutes you can find out what you are worth with the comprehensive PayScale salary survey.

  • Top Paying Undergraduate Degree Majors: Which List is Right?

    The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) released their annual list of top 15 paying undergraduate majors yesterday.

    They are a little late: We released the PayScale list of salary by major last week :-)

    While the top level take away - starting pay is highest for engineering and other technical fields - the differences are an interesting look into how a survey is defined affects the results.

    Are you being paid all you are worth? Spend 5 minutes completing the PayScale online salary evaluation survey and know.

  • Teaching Salaries USA vs. World

    Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez made the news when he announced a 40% increase in school teacher salaries (reported by plenglish.com) for the Latin American country. Teachers will reportedly see that salary boost in November of 2007.  Chavez was quoted as saying, "...we will do everything possible to continue rising standard of living, not only with the basic salary but also with social security and housing plans."

    While Chavez's true long-term agenda is questionable, there is no denying that U.S. educators would welcome a raise in school teacher salaries. In fact, how does the U.S. compare to the rest of the world?  According to a report of global school teacher salaries by the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), the U.S. is lagging behind. To find out why, read more.

    How does your salary compare to the average school teacher salaries?  Find out with the PayScale Salary Calculator.   

  • Median vs. Mean Lawyer Salaries: Is Law School Worth It?

    A recent article in the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), "Hard Case: Job Market Wanes for U.S. Lawyers", reported on the large number of law school graduates suffering under large debt with surprisingly low salary prospects.

    If only these prospective law students had been reading this blog. They would have understood the difference between median and mean, and that only 10% of students can be in the 90th percentile of salaries :-)

    While the Wall Street Journal focused on the somewhat misleading marketing done by second tier law schools, in truth there is plenty of data available, e.g., from PayScale's research center, on just how low the typical median starting lawyer salaries are.

    In this post, I'll look at lawyers salaries: the top, the bottom, and the middle. Yes, for specific skill sets and employers, the attorney salaries are still good. That pay just is not the typical (median) law student's experience.

    Is your salary above or below the median for people like you? Find out with the PayScale Salary Calculator.