• Wealthy College Presidents May Be the Reason You’re Broke [infographic]

    A recent report released by the Institute for Policy Studies finds that student debt and low-wage faculty labor are rising faster at state universities with the highest-paid presidents. Usually those three hotly debated issues: student debt, increased use of part-time faculty, and inflated executive pay are discussed as separate issues, but researchers wondered if the three were related. What they found shows that all three are connected in ways worthy of a Charles Dickens novel.

  • How Much Do You Need to Earn to Buy a Home in Your City?

    One of the causes of the Great Recession was predatory lending practices that encouraged borrowers to buy more house than they could afford. No wonder, then, that in the rebuilding years of our economy, many are focused on figuring out how much they'd need to earn to responsibly buy a home in their city.

  • Rise of the $1 CEO: The Misleading Nature of CEO Pay

    Larry Page, CEO of Google, gets $1 for his annual salary. Ditto Edward Lampert, CEO of Sears, and Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook. Of course, there's a lot more to total compensation than just salary -- especially for chief executives.

  • CEOs Received Smaller Raises Last Year

    The top CEOs in the US got a 1 percent raise last year, according to disclosures from 46 companies in the Standard & and Poor's 500. The previous year, CEOs' pay jumped 15 percent.

  • Can You Live on the Minimum Wage in Your State?

    A nifty new tool from The New York Times lets you enter your living expenses, including rent, utilities, food, healthcare, and debt, and figure out if you could get by on the minimum wage in your state. Spoiler alert: you probably can't.

  • 5 Healthcare Jobs That Don't Require a 4-Year Degree

    Over half of the occupations expected to grow by 30 percent or more over the next decade are healthcare professions, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook. Even more significantly for folks without a lot of time or money to devote to retraining, some of them don't require a bachelor's degree for entry. A few are available to folks who only have a high school diploma.

  • Do You Have One of the Hottest Jobs of 2014?
    US News recent released its list of the 100 best jobs of 2014. We will take a look at which jobs are in the top ten, so read on to see if your profession made the cut.
  • Who Wants to Raise the Minimum Wage? The Answer May Surprise You
    Is raising the federal minimum wage rate beneficial to the economy or not? We'll take a look at who's for and against raising the wage and how level of education affects people's opinions.
  • How One 15-Year-Old Girl Is Changing the Future for Women in Business
    A young lady by the name of Adora Svitak wants nothing more than to eradicate the gender inequalities that continue to impede women's progress. We’ll take a look at how this 15-year-old feminist is changing the landscape for women and young ladies in business around the globe.
  • Job Stress Is Killing Your Career and Your Health
    As if you didn't already know, the costs of job stress are high when it comes to both your personal and your professional life. We’ll take a look at what some of the most stressful jobs are in America, and also provide ways to cope with the strain of your 9-to-5.
  • 5 Reasons Why Coding Is a Kid’s Wildest Dream

    Kodable aims at providing children with the tools and resources needed to help them build the knowledge necessary to pick up on any programming language later on in life. But what's so great about coding?

  • Low-Paying Fast-Food Jobs Cost Taxpayers Big Bucks

    Here's a new wrinkle on the debate over what constitutes a reasonable wage for fast food workers: New research from the University of California at Berkeley indicates that the fast food industry costs American taxpayers $7 billion annually, thanks to the fact that 52 percent of fast food workers are forced to rely in part on public assistance.

  • Low Wages Affect Us All, Especially Children
    Almost a quarter of the children living in America are growing up in poverty. Fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King, Jr. marched on Washington to demand jobs and freedom. We still have a long way to go to fulfill King's dream.
  • How Lawyers Bill

    How Lawyers Bill

    Whether you want to work as a lawyer, work for lawyers, or are considering hiring a lawyer, it is good to understand the facts behind how lawyers bill.

  • What's Trending on Twitter - Royal Baby, Nelson Mandela, and Justin Bieber
    This week's Twitter roundup recaps three trending topics that have caused quite a buzz: #RoyalBaby, #NelsonMandela, and #JustinBieber. Read on to find out how the above trending hashtags relate to returning to work after having a baby, being a better leader, and how Justin Bieber's salary makes yours look like chump change. Sorry.
  • PayScale Teams Up With Nokia's JobLens App to Revolutionize Mobile Job Searching
    Good news for job hunters in the UK - the job hunt just got a whole lot easier and more convenient thanks to JobLens, a Nokia mobile app that helps job seekers locate opportunities based on their location and social media networks. The app has partnered with key companies such as Indeed, LinkedIn, and (most importantly) PayScale to make the job search to application process seamless. Learn about this app for a peek into the future of job hunting.
  • During 1998-2000, author Barbara Ehrenreich went undercover as low-wage, unskilled laborer in three different types of jobs. She wanted to experience first-hand just how difficult it is to support oneself as a low-wage laborer.

  • CEO Pay vs. Typical Worker Pay

    We recently released an insightful bit of data that looks at the ratio of pay for Fortune 50 CEOs to the pay of employees at their respective companies. The results are unsettling -- on average the Fortune 50 CEOs earn 213 times more than their workers.

    Who tops the list for the biggest ratio and which CEO earns pay closest to their employees? See the answers below...

  • College is Not Always a Good Investment

    Today, we released our annual study with Bloomberg BusinessWeek on the return on investment (ROI) in education for 691 bachelor's degree granting schools.

    As college costs continue to rise, the justification for paying these costs becomes ever more important. What better justification is there but a measure of their future payoff? In other words, is attending college a good investment in terms of the pay increase it offers over a high school degree?

    The PayScale ROI study helps to answer this question, but the answer is not a simple yes or no. Whether attending college is a good investment or not depends upon many factors, such as the cost incurred, graduation rates at the school, major choice, and the typical pay of the school's graduates.

    In this post I will briefly discuss the methodology of the study, how it changed from last year, and some key insights from the data.

    Whether you went to college or not, are you earning what you are worth? Find out with a free PayScale salary report.

  • PayScale Index: What is an Index Anyway?

    We at PayScale recently released the Q4 2010 results for the PayScale Index. See a previous blog post describing the Index and another one that compares the PayScale Index to other common measures of labor market health.

    However, a common question posed by our readers in response to our release was, "What is an Index?" Or in other words, "What do the numerical values actually measure?"

    In simple terms, an index tracks changes in a variable from some baseline time period. In terms of the PayScale Index, the variable we are tracking is the total cash compensation for full-time private industry employees in the U.S and the baseline year is 2006.

    In this post I will further discuss what an index measures, how it is calculated and compare the PayScale Index to another commonly used index, the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

    Understanding how we measure changes in compensation over time is interesting, but so is understanding your place in the current labor market. Find out where you are with a free PayScale salary report.

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