• Retirees Have More Education Debt Than Ever
    There's a joke going around: If you had a nickel for every time you heard someone from the older generation make fun of the younger generation, you'd have enough money to buy a house in the economy they ruined.
  • Want to Make Bank? Avoid These 5 Graduate Degrees
    Grad school can make or break your career. Choose the right advanced degree, and you can skyrocket to success; choose the wrong one, and you'll rack up debt, but see little payoff. Recently, PayScale helped Fortune crunch some numbers to determine the best and worst graduate degrees out there, with potential income being the most critical factor. While there's obviously more to consider than just cost, it's important to keep in mind how much debt you're getting into – and therefore how much you'll have to make to pay it back – as average tuition for a graduate degree runs $36,000 to $63,000 a year.
  • Good News for College Grads: More Real Jobs
    Wondering about whether to go back to school to finish (or start) your bachelor's degree? You might not have to worry quite as much about whether you'll have a job after graduation, at least compared to grads from the past few years. The latest research shows that full-time, permanent jobs for college graduates are on the rise.
  • Snapchat Transforms New Grads Into Paper Millionaires
    Most recent college graduates would be thrilled just to get a job fresh out of school. If it pays the bills and makes a dent in those student loans, so much the better. But for some graduates of select engineering schools like Stanford, going to work at Snapchat will do more than just make ends meet.
  • 3 Ways Colleges Are Wasting Your Money
    Want to get mad? If you have ever attended or plan to attend college, take a look at a Ted Scheinman's recent Pacific Standard article, entitled How Colleges Misspend Your Tuition Money. The URL, which includes the phrase "pay for decent teachers, not Dr. Phil," gives the first hint of what lies ahead. Hint: it's not a sound investment in teaching staff, but if you've talked to any underpaid, untenured adjunct faculty lately, you probably already knew that.
  • #PayChat Recap: College ROI
    What's the real value of a college degree? Understanding that many benefits of education are intangible, in an era when student loan debt is higher than ever before and post-graduation employment far from a sure thing, most prospective students want to make sure that their tuition dollars are an investment in their future. PayScale's recently released College ROI Report ranks schools and majors by the return students can expect from their investment. In today's #PayChat on Twitter, we asked readers to share their experiences.
  • How to Talk to Your Parents About Majoring in the Humanities
    Choosing to major in any of the humanities disciplines brings with it many intellectual challenges and rewards. You learn a new body of knowledge, how to think, read, and write about it critically, and how to engage in disputes over its issues in productive ways. You also take on the challenge of justifying your major to your parents.
  • College ROI: What If STEM Isn't for You?
    Every year, one things stands out in PayScale's College ROI report: STEM degrees offer the highest return on students' tuition dollar. That means that the schools that offer degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math tend to come out on top of the ranking. It doesn't mean, however, that you should try to force your artist's heart to embrace STEM.
  • When It Comes to Job Skills, American Millennials Are in a Race to the Bottom
    The youngest workers, the ones who grew up alongside the latest and greatest technologies, have always been assumed to be more skilled in their use. It's probably been like this since the invention of the typewriter, but it's increasingly true now, in an era when most office jobs rely on digital technologies that adapt seemingly by the minute. In addition, today's young workers are more educated than ever before, boasting more years of education than any previous generation. There's just one problem: recent research shows that Gen Y workers in the U.S. are anything but highly skilled.
  • 5 Tips on Choosing a College: Confessions of an Art School Grad
    By now, we probably all know someone who struggles with student loan debt or job woes. Many of us young folk went to college hoping to make our dreams come true, only to find ourselves saddled with enormous debt and no job prospects. Young grads are still having trouble nailing down that first professional job, and many people aren't working in the industries they trained for. It wasn't exactly a walk in the park for older people either, whose careers went kaput and they had to go back to school or get new training. Stories from the Great Recession are many among us.
  • College ROI Report: Will You Earn Enough to Pay Off Your Debt?
    Student loan debt is on the rise. In 2011, 51 percent of first-time, full-time college students had took out student loans, according to the National Center of Education Statistics, an 11 percent increase from 10 years prior. The average size of those loans also increased by 36 percent. During the same period, the country experienced one of the worst recessions in its history, offering college students fewer resources to draw on, in order to offset loans, and dimmer prospects of high-earning employment after graduation. In the latest edition of the College ROI report, PayScale examines which colleges and universities offer the best return and lowest debt load for prospective students.
  • PayScale's 2015 College ROI Report: Will Your Degree Pay Off?
    Student loan debt has more than quadrupled over the past 20 years, according to Pew Research Center. In 2012, the average loan total was $29,400, and seven out of 10 students graduated with debt. No wonder that many prospective students (and their parents) consider the return on their college investment before choosing a school or program. PayScale's 2015 College ROI Report ranks the schools and majors whose graduates receive a high rate of return from attending -- in other words, they earned back their tuition and fees, and then some, and then went on to earn much higher salaries than they would have without their degree.
  • PayScale at SXSW: Economic Mobility Through Education, and What Employers Really Want From Grads
    SXSWedu began as a regional event focusing on K-12 education in Texas, but since its inception in 2011, it has evolved into an international conference on what makes education work for students and educators. SXSWedu Conference & Festival now offers 300 sessions and workshops, 700 speakers, and an Education Expo. This year, PayScale is participating in two panel discussions: Economic Mobility Through Education, and What Employers Want Most and Get Least from Grads.
  • The 10 Most (and 10 Least) Profitable Undergraduate College Degrees
    Of course, you could make your millions after earning your bachelor's degree in English or art history, but if high earning potential is your post-graduation goal, you'll want to target your educational plans accordingly. (Hint: think STEM.)
  • Here's What Workers Cared About in 2014: 10 Most Popular Posts
    Humans are fascinated by the worst-case scenario -- the blown job interview, the botched salary negotiation, the bad college choice. It's not always schadenfreude, either. By analyzing the bad things that could happen, it's easier to prepare and avoid them. This year, PayScale's most popular posts were the ones that helped readers dodge disaster.
  • What Code Should You Learn? [infographic]
    Learn to code. It's the advice of career experts everywhere, from high school guidance counselors to mid-career job coaches. But with literally hundreds of languages to choose from, you might find yourself a bit lost as to which language to focus on first -- especially if the goal isn't to become a computer programmer, but rather to boost your career in your current (non-programming) field.
  • 4 Alternatives to Going to College
    Four years ago, I was sitting in my college dorm in Conway, Arkansas, wondering why paying $39,290 a year possibly made sense. I had come to college with hopes that it would make me a better person, but I soon realized that I would learn far more by going out to experience that world, rather than paying people tell me about the world. Disillusioned with school, I left.
  • Is Capping Student Loans at $10K a Good Idea?
    Recently, billionaire investor Mark Cuban declared that fixing the student debt crisis is the most important thing our government can do to restore the national economy. His idea: cap federal student loans at $10,000 per student, per year. Few would argue that student loan debt isn’t a problem of epic proportions, but Cuban’s explanation of the crisis and his solution resulted in mixed reactions.
  • How College Rankings Work [infographic]
    Every year, media outlets run their lists of the top colleges and universities in the country, and every year, prospective students read them and scratch their heads, wondering why this list says that Princeton is the nation's top university, while that list says it's Stanford, and so on. The answer is that every list-maker has its own set of criteria for determining the best institutions. To find the best school for you, start by learning what goes into these rankings.
  • Advanced Degrees Are No Guarantee, But Most of the Highest Earners Have One
    Much has been written -- here, and elsewhere -- about the fact that graduate degrees are no guarantee of success. However, PayScale's College Salary Report shows that the highest earners tend to have advanced degrees. Furthermore, the wage earners who see the largest increase in their salaries over the course of their careers are generally those who continue their education beyond a two- or four-year degree.