• Tweet Like a Man, and Get More Retweets
    A recent study showed that men get retweeted more than women. The question is, why? We'll examine the science behind why tweets published by men are, on average, more popular than those by women and how professionals can apply this knowledge to their enhance their career potential, regardless of gender.
  • New App Helps to Keep Your Online Image Clean
    Despite partying hard all throughout college, you somehow managed to graduate with decent grades and now you're on your way to paving a successful career path. Your partying days may be behind you now, but that doesn't mean they won't come back to haunt you when you least expect it – for instance, when you're trying to land your dream job. A simple Google search is all it takes for recruiters to dig up every humiliating photo that you've ever been tagged in on Facebook. Well, now a new app aims to prevent your past from ruining your chances of a brighter future.
  • Hillary Clinton Fights Like a Woman for Paid Leave
    It was Mother's Day on Sunday, so it's probably not really surprising that Hillary Clinton released a video about her mother (and daughter and granddaughter). But, set against the birth of her granddaughter, she also briefly retells a story about a nurse who said, "Thank you for fighting for paid family leave." Is it just political posturing, or can we finally hope for some resolution to the shameful state of family leave in the U.S.?
  • The High Cost of College Is Leaving Many Students Out in the Cold
    College should be one of the most memorable times in a person's life, not a time of financial stress, anxiety, and hopelessness. However, with the rising cost of attending college and student loan debt more than quadrupling over the past two decades, obtaining a degree is proving to be a strain, especially for students who are financially burdened. One group of low-income students from Columbia University is using social media to shed light on the dismal realities of being a poor student in one of the most prestigious and expensive Ivy League schools in the nation, with a Facebook page entitled Columbia University Class Confessions.
  • 3 Things Millennials Want, 3 Things They Could Do Without
    Born between 1980 and 2000, Millennials are the largest generation group in US history, comprising roughly 75.3 million of the nation's population and surpassing even the Baby Boomer generation. Needless to say, it's important to understand how this crowd thinks and functions, seeing the tremendous impact they have on the workplace and how it will evolve in the very near future. Here's a list of three things Millennials want in their lives, and three things they could simply do without … for now.
  • 5 Reasons Why STEM Has a Woman Problem
    How is it that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) companies can find solutions for some of the world's most complex problems, but they can't seem to solve the gender bias issue that keeps women out of STEM careers? According to new research, it's because we, as a culture, don't know that there's even a problem – it's unconscious, and we're all to blame.
  • Employee Monitoring: Justifiable Security Measure or Overly Orwellian?
    Remember that time you worked yourself into a hypochondriac frenzy, and wound up spending the whole afternoon at the office surfing WebMD and trying to figure out if people get cholera anymore? As it turns out, Bill the IT guy — or even your CEO — may have been assessing your risks at the same time in a very different way for very different reasons.
  • Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression
    Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.
  • 5 New Career Paths That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago
    The workplace is changing, thanks to new technologies and new ways of thinking about work. If you're looking to venture into semi-uncharted territory in hopes of a brighter career trajectory, then you may want to consider one of these five new careers.
  • What Your Tweets and Posts Tell Recruiters Could Keep You From Getting the Job
    Would you think twice about sharing a mindless "I'm so bored" post on social media if you knew that research shows that people who do so experience higher rates of heart attacks and strokes? What's worse, research that ties social media use to emotional stability/instability is making its way into the hands of people that you probably don't want to be privy to such information: recruiters, hiring managers, and employers. Here's what you need to know about what your social media sharing is saying about you.
  • 3 Ways to Successfully Market Your Expertise Online and Boost Your Career
    Don't you ever wish your dream career would just fall into your lap one day? Thanks to the majestic ways of the internet (and a little due diligence on your part), that fantasy could be a reality. Read on to see how marketing your expertise online can lead to bigger and better opportunities finding their way into your career.
  • Google Chairman Manterrupts Female Tech Leader at SXSW to Mansplain Need for Diversity in Tech
    "Mansplaining" is a term coined to describe the behavior of those men who have the need to explain what they believe are complex topics, in which they may or may not be well-versed, to women in a manner that is elementary enough for even a woman to understand. This very thing happened at SXSW this week, except this time, the "manterrupter" got called out publicly. Here's how it went down.
  • If You Want to Go Places in Your Career, Be Still
    It's frustrating to have people remind you to "stop and smell the roses" when your life seems to be going 1,000 miles per hour -- but that doesn't mean it's bad advice. Learn how taking a step back can actually help you move forward in your life and your career.
  • 5 Ways to Survive Work-at-Home Hell
    Most workers work from home occasionally at some point in their career, and some of us do it on a full-time basis. After all, if you've telecommuted at all, you know how your home-based environment can dramatically improve your productivity. Distractions are limited, and you're able to focus on the project at hand. So, why do some companies forbid, discourage, or in other ways inhibit their workers from telecommuting? In short, it's because there's also a downside to working from home.
  • 5 Takeaways From One Teacher’s Social Media Experiment for Her Students
    One Minnesota high school teacher, Michelle Van Bibber of Stewartville High School, decided to teach her students a valuable lesson about over-sharing on social media and how quickly things can go viral on the Internet. The lesson learned that day is one that doesn't just apply to our younger generations -- especially, it concerns working professionals who may not be convinced that their posts could negatively affect their careers.
  • Social Media Data Is Being Used to Calculate Student Loan Risk in the UK
    Calculating risk is a complex process, particularly in the competitive student loans market. Basing decisions on potential earnings rather than current assets and income, as banks traditionally do, makes more sense when it comes to loaning to young people. Now, some companies are turning to social media, and checking out clients' connections, in order to assess the risk of the potential borrower, and also to put pressure on those who default.
  • Meet the YouTube Millionaires
    Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)
  • We Need More Women in Tech, and Here's What You Can Do About It
    Women are less likely than men to go into STEM careers, but it's not from a lack of initial interest or talent. Somewhere along the way, girls and women are turning in other directions, with the result that only about 18 percent of women earn degrees in computer science and 19 percent earn engineering degrees, according to the National Girls Collaborative Project.
  • Facebook and LinkedIn Team Up to Help Women in Tech
    The two social network powerhouses, Facebook and LinkedIn, are joining forces to launch programs that will encourage more women to pursue degrees and careers in what has long been a man's world -- the world of tech. Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg (COO) and LinkedIn's Jeffrey Weiner (CEO) are launching mentoring and support programs at colleges to inspire more women to pursue tech-related education in hopes that they will, one day, fill the thousands of job availabilities in the heavily male-dominant tech industry.
  • Sexual Harassment in the Workplace: Should You Let Them Chase You Away?
    As many as one in four women have experienced sexual harassment at work, according to one poll. In some industries, those numbers are worse: a 2014 report from The Restaurant Opportunities Center United found that 70 percent of female food service workers experienced harassment from their bosses, and 90 percent experienced it from customers.

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