• Work Friendships Are Not Necessarily Real Friendships
    Work friendships are good to have, but they are different from and do not take the place of real friendships. Recognize the difference between the two and enjoy the benefits of each, but avoid making the mistake of relying on work friends for real, personal companionship and confidence.
  • Pre-cation: The Best Job Perk You Don't Have

    Most workers don't get much time off between jobs. If you're leaving one job for another, you're unlikely to be able to coordinate a reasonable start date and sufficient notice to keep from burning bridges at your old employer; if you've been unemployed, well, taking more time off without pay might be impossible. But what if you could get a vacation, paid, before you started work?

  • Are Activity Trackers Any Match for Slouchy Office Workers?

    Chances are, you know at least one person who's in love with her Fitbit or Fuelband, and its calorie- and step-counting assistance -- especially if you work in an office, where workers spend more time sitting than improving their health. Now, one company is offering an activity tracker that measures an additional element of fitness: good posture.

  • 3 Ways to Negotiate Your Way to a Happier Job

    Once you make enough money to pay the bills, a bigger salary won't necessarily buy you happiness. But if you can arrange your job so that you have more autonomy and purpose, and better work-life balance, you just might feel a little bit more cheerful about heading off to work in the morning.

  • The Office That Disappears When You Go Home at Night

    Remember when 9-to-5 was considered a full day of work? For many office workers, eight hours a day would now look like a part-time job. At one Amsterdam-based company, however, the standard work day might be making a comeback, thanks to an innovative design concept: their office essentially disappears at night, Brigadoon-style.

  • At Work, It's Better to be a Father Than a Mother
    While working mothers struggle with decreased pay and lack of status in a workplace that sees them as unreliable, working fathers enjoy improved status, pay, and benefits that help a growing family survive.
  • The Key to Success Is Authenticity
    Successful entrepreneurs have one thing in common that has very little to do with luck, education, or money – it’s actually their ability to be true to themselves and their dreams. Let’s take a look at three entrepreneurs whose authenticity helped them build wildly successful empires, even when the odds were against them.
  • If Wages Are Up, Why Are Workers Still Discontent?
    A recent Gallup poll showed that fewer workers are worried about being laid off this year (19 percent, as opposed to 29 percent in 2013). In fact, workers were less worried about job setbacks in general, with fewer respondents citing concerns of cut benefits, hours, and wages. But this doesn't mean that workers are necessarily happy at their jobs.
  • 5 Tips to Sharpen Your Focus and Boost Productivity
    In today’s information-overload age, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to maintain focus on everyday tasks, which can be detrimental to your productivity. Here are a few proven ways to help find your concentration throughout the day.
  • Is Your Workplace Psychologically Healthy? These 5 Questions Help Clarify
    Psychologically healthy workplaces don't need to be perfect -- just functional. You may enjoy a great supervisor but put up with toxic co-workers, or you may have a great place to work but a boring job. The following questions will help you clarify what works and what needs improvement in your work life.
  • When Your Gut Says, 'It's Time to Quit'

    Quitting a job isn't something we do on a lark. Financial considerations, career concerns, and a dearth of available alternatives keep many people at their current place of work even when they might prefer to be elsewhere. However, paying attention to sometimes subtle signs that you are done here may help you plan for a better future and save your sanity. Listen to your gut.

  • 40 Percent of Workers Don't Take All Their Vacation

    According to a recent report from the U.S. Travel Association, 96 percent of workers see the value in taking time off -- but only 60 percent of us actually use up all our vacation time. The rest of us let paid days off expire, unused. Why aren't we using our earned time?

  • Didn't Sleep? Here Are 7 Ways to Get Through Your Work Day

    Americans seem to pride themselves on sleep deprivation, functioning on little or no sleep for days on end, and still (somehow) making it to work -- but that doesn't mean that it's healthy, or good for your career.

  • Protect Yourself From Bullies at Work
    Bullies aren't just a grade-school phenomenon; you'll find bullies and bullying behavior in offices and workplaces, long after you've reached adulthood. If you are stuck working with a bully, there are ways to mitigate the damage and protect yourself.
  • 5 Things That Make a Psychologically Healthy Workplace
    If you have ever torn your hair out wondering if you are going crazy at work, it is just possible that you're OK, and the workplace is to blame. The American Psychological Association recognizes that psychologically healthy workplaces are most likely to increase your motivation, your confidence, and your job performance. There are five general areas in which employers may pass or fail the psychologically healthy workplace "test."
  • What's the Difference Between Good Stress and Bad Stress?

    Chronic stress is bad for you, potentially affecting everything from your physical health to your productivity at work. But a little stress, now and then, can actually make you better at your job and happier both at home and at the office.

  • Here's What Is Stressing Out Americans

    Sometimes, it's the little things that get you. A recent survey from NPR, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that while health problems and work upheaval are the biggest causes of stress for most people on a long-term basis, daily stressors like juggling family schedules and commuting to work also have an effect on our perception of stress and its impact on our lives.

  • Vacations Are Good for You and Good for Your Employer

    It's not news that many Americans don't take vacations -- or that they should. But at this time of year, it bears repeating: that last-minute getaway might mean the difference between doing your job well, and stumbling through the day with low energy and a bad attitude.

  • Male CEO Steps Down to Spend Time With Family

    When a woman quits her job to spend more time with family, no one bats an eye. When a man does the same, it's news. Earlier this week, Max Schireson announced that he'd be leaving his role as CEO of MongoDB in order to travel less and be at home with his wife and children more. The shock that reverberated throughout the internet is proof, if we still needed any, that men and women have not achieved parity in the business world.

  • Video Games and TV Can Be Good for You (as Long as You Don't Feel Guilty)
    People need to have fun during their time off, in order to feel refreshed and go back to work with a clear mind. When guilt rears its ugly head, it destroys the benefits of indulging in our preferred leisure activities, and makes us less productive in the long run.