• Do You Have 'Career Compulsive Disorder'?
    Raise your hand if your lunch breaks consist of sitting at your desk, scarfing down food, and pounding away on your keyboard trying to get through emails. Turns out, you're not alone. According to Gallup's Work and Education Survey findings, adults working full-time in the U.S. spend an average of 47 hours per week plugging away at their jobs, and nearly four in 10 say they work at least 50 hours per week.
  • Here's Why You Have Impostor Syndrome (Even Though You Shouldn't)
    Do you feel like a fake? If so, you might be suffering from impostor syndrome, the feeling of intellectual or professional fraudulence that manifests as severe self-doubt. Even when all evidence indicates that they are competent, someone experiencing impostor syndrome can't shake the feeling that they don't know what they're doing professionally, and that soon enough someone is going to find out that they're faking their way through their job and they'll be fired.
  • 5 Things You Didn't Know About FMLA
    The purpose of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is to help employees balance work and personal or medical needs. It was passed in 1993 during the Clinton administration as a way to protect the jobs of workers who needed to take time off to care for themselves or family members, including babies. (The U.S. is the only industrialized country in the world that does not offer paid maternity leave.) Workers who are contemplating taking leave often find themselves confused about what the FMLA does and doesn't cover. Here's what you need to know.
  • Paid Parental Leave Continues to Gain Momentum in the US
    Lately, a lot more American companies have been jumping on the paid paternal leave bandwagon and finally offering their employees more paid time off after having a baby. This is great news for working parents in America – because, if you're a working parent, then you know that the struggle is very real. We'll take a look at how some companies in the U.S. are stepping up their paid paternal leave game, even if the country as a whole still lags behind the rest of the world.
  • When It Comes to Work Hours, Less Is More
    A few weeks ago, The New York Times put Amazon's work culture under the microscope . While many employees, both current and past, have chimed in since the article came out, we're now finding time to turn the focus to our own work lives. Should we all strive to be as driven as Amazonians who love their 60-plus hour work weeks? Should we all keep the cube lights on into the wee hours to show how much we "care"? The answer, despite our best efforts to die at our desks, may be "Nope."
  • Find Happiness at Work ... With More Sleep
    If you're burning the midnight oil for work, you're in trouble. All that time at your desk means you're missing out on a key performance ingredient: sleep. Studies show that we're happier when we get more sleep, but how does that translate to the office? You might be surprised.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Should Women Even Bother Negotiating Salary?
    Here's a little controversy to wrap up your week: in her latest blog post, Penelope Trunk argues that women are penalized for negotiating salary, and for this and other reasons, they shouldn't do it at all. Whew. Find that, plus what happens when you don't take a vacation, and the best sites to help you land a job in 2015, in this week's roundup.
  • The Shocking Reality of Maternity Leave in the US: 1 in 4 Women Take Only 2 Weeks Off
    Two weeks. 14 days. That's the entire length of maternity leave that most American workers take when their child is born. And, it seems some of us are shocked by that fact. After all, we're all protected by the Family and Medical Leave Act, right? Since 1993, the FMLA has ensured 12 work weeks off in a 12-month period, but that doesn't sync up with the reality that nearly 25 percent of women are forced to return to work after two weeks.
  • Can't Remember Your Last Vacation? You're Not Alone.
    If you have trouble recalling that sand-in-your-toes feeling of a long vacation; you're not the only one. New data shows that a whopping 56 percent of Americans haven't taken a real vacation (one week away from the office) in the last 12 months. What's worse? That’s up from 52 percent in 2012. It's not that we don't need a week away from the grind, it's that we just aren't clocking out. But why?
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How Do I Get My Report to Take a Vacation?
    Ask most workers how they feel about vacation, and they'll tell you they don't get enough time off – unless they're one of those curious souls who seems to prefer toiling to time at the beach. Of course, things are not always what they seem: an apparent workaholic might be someone who fears losing her job, or whose workload seems too heavy to permit even a few days' reprieve. This week's roundup looks at what managers can do to help reports feel comfortable taking a much-needed vacation; plus, the things we're most likely to regret when we're older, and the important differences between a resume and LinkedIn profile.
  • 7 Tips for Young Women Who Aspire to Be Leaders
    While some girls are busy dreaming about their wedding day, others are fantasizing about being the next Sheryl Sandberg or Mary Barra. For the ambitious, here's some advice to support you in your endeavors and encourage you to become the leader you are truly meant to be.
  • 5 Quotes That Will Inspire You to Keep Chasing Your Dreams
    If only we could all go back in time and be the fearless children we once were. Maybe – just maybe – we would have the courage to chase our wildest dreams in our lives as adults. There's no doubt that life hardens us all over time and causes even the best of us to give in to the pressures of "making something" of ourselves. Along the way, our childlike glee seems to fade as we lose focus on what truly makes us happy in life. Instead, it's easy to end up following someone else's dreams and not our own. Here are five quotes that will hopefully convince you that it's not too late to go after your dreams, no matter how wild and crazy they may seem.
  • Are Tech Jobs Just Crazy Hard on Workers?
    The short answer is "yes." It's also "no" and "it depends." The recent New York Times critique of Amazon's work culture — the most commented-on piece in the publication's history — has resulted in a firestorm of both backlash and support from the media and tech titans. Former and current Amazon employees have chimed in, sharing views and experiences that both support and negate the Times' claim that Amazon is a company guilty of "conducting an experiment in how far it can push white-collar workers to get them to achieve its ever-expanding ambitions."
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Work-Life Balance a Lie?
    This week, the question on everyone's mind was, can working at Amazon really be as bad as the New York Times article made it out to be – and beyond that, do employers have a responsibility to create work-life balance? PayScale's latest blog roundup looks at whether it's possible to be dedicated to work and family, plus 65 businesses you can start to help you escape the rat race, and 15 things you can do to be happier at work right now.
  • Bruising or Beneficial: In the Amazon Debate, What Really Counts Is What You Want (From Your Employer)
    Ever since The New York Times published its scathing, 5,000-word takedown of work culture at Amazon, the topic of work-life balance has been the talk of the town. The commentary won't stop, whether it's from Amazon's most rabid defenders or passionate opponents. Even famously silent CEO Jeff Bezos has issued a response. The resulting debate has been fascinating (and probably a bit cathartic for anybody who found themselves working over the weekend), but searching for a definitive answer about whether Amazon is "good" or "bad" probably won't make a difference in your daily life or sense of job satisfaction. What you can, and should, take from the ongoing conversation is the importance of corporate culture in general and its effect on the way you think about the idea of total compensation, and ultimately, the way you negotiate salary.
  • 3 Ways to Tell if You're Selling Yourself Short in Your Career
    Hating your job is one thing, but staying put and wasting your life and career away is another. We all had wild dreams about what we wanted to be when we grew up, but things don't always play out as we once hoped they would. Chances are, you chose your career based on a combination of what you thought was semi-interesting in college, what your parents thought was right for you, and what had a decent earning potential – but, unfortunately, it's just not cutting it anymore. If this sounds familiar, then you may be selling yourself short, my friend. Here are three ways to tell if you're guilty of cheating yourself out of success in your life and career.
  • Adobe Offers More Paid Parental Leave
    Netflix and Microsoft have already paved the way, but now Adobe announced that it's joining the other top tech companies in offering more paid leave to parents. Their leave package is now at 26 weeks (10 weeks of medical leaven and 16 weeks of parental leave) – that's double what they offered in the past, but it's not even really a surprise.
  • Incredible Company Perks: Top 5 Swag and Service-Based Perks
    Imagine penciling "manicure" between "conference call" and "team meeting" on your to-do list, and letting your boss deal with cleaning your house. Or, if whimsy is your thing, think about what it would be like to rent a kitten for your cubicle, or get unlimited free Snickers for the rest of your career. At some companies, perks like these aren't just the stuff of daydreams – they're employees' real-life, workaday experience.
  • Is Amazon a 'Soulless, Dystopian Workplace'?
    This weekend, The New York Times published an exposé of working conditions at Amazon corporate. Amazonians, the article claims, are required to work long hours, in a data-driven environment that means constant performance evaluations; are expected to answer emails after midnight, sometimes at the prompting of follow-up texts; and are encouraged to inform on one another to management. Workers who don't come up to snuff allegedly are culled in layoffs that a former employee describes as "purposeful Darwinism" – some former employees claimed to have been pushed out after miscarriages or cancer. In an internal memo shortly after publication, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos responded, saying that the company described doesn't match his view of the organization and urging workers to come forward if they disagree.
  • What to Do When Your Job Keeps Growing and Growing...
    You know the deal. You're hired to do a job. That job comes with a job description or maybe even a contract that lists the responsibilities and duties assigned to you as said job holder. Next, you start to get comfortable with your new position. Soon, you're doing well, and before you know it, you start winning the respect of your co-workers and even your bosses. You're starting to feel pretty good about yourself, and this job – and that's usually right around the time when things start to change.