• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do You Feel Trapped in Your Career?
    The average person changes jobs 10 to 15 times over the course of their career, and spends less than five years at each job. Harder to figure out: how many times they change careers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't track it, and many changes are pretty subtle anyway, as career paths naturally evolve over time. Sometimes, however, you have to make a leap. In this week's roundup, we look at what to do when you need to make a big career change, plus resume rules you should stop breaking, and ways to beat burnout.
  • Planning a Summer Vacation? 5 Reasons to Try for 2 Weeks
    March is about to go out like a lamb, and the blooming flowers and rising temperatures have a lot of people thinking about one thing – vacation. In fact, this is a great time of year to start planning your summer vacation away from the office. Before you submit that time-off request though, here's a thought: can you try for two weeks off?
  • America's Corporate Culture Is Too Stuck In Its Ways to Allow Paid Family Leave to Work
    The U.S. is one of the few countries in the world that doesn't mandate any kind of paid family leave, and only 12 percent of private-sector employees in this country have access to it. This is despite the increasing number of elite employers who offer generous perks designed to improve work-life balance. What will it take for paid family leave to truly gain traction in the U.S.? Beyond a law requiring it, we'd need nothing less than a complete cultural shift. Even if paid leave were to be granted tomorrow to every employee nationwide, there's one problem that would still remain: an unsupportive corporate culture that makes it hard to take time away from work to take care of family.
  • Sabbaticals Are Good for Workers and Employers
    If you're like most Americans, three things are probably true for you. First, you desperately need a break from your job. You're tired and stressed, and feeling rundown and overworked is typical for you. Second, despite this, you haven't taken a vacation in a while. And, it's not necessarily because you're not entitled – you might have unused vacation days. In that case, you feel that you can't, or shouldn't, get away from the office. You worry that it could hurt business, your individual performance, or even your career standing or trajectory. And finally, if you're like most American workers, you haven't even dared to dream about taking a sabbatical. But, maybe you should. You, and your employer, would be wise to take it under serious consideration. Here's what you need to know.
  • 3 Ways Meditation Could Help You Enjoy Your Job More
    We all have professional goals we're working toward. It's great to be ambitious, strive to be more productive, etc. But, it's also all right, advisable even, to want to enjoy your job more. Deep down, finding greater contentment or even joy from our work is something we all hope for. Sure, mindfulness practices like meditation can help you advance your career, but there are deeper benefits as well. Meditation could actually help you enjoy your job more, too. Here are a few things you should know.
  • Why Is There Still Such a Thing as 'Late to Work'?
    There's being late, and then there's dropping the ball. A workplace isn't high school (even though it can feel that way), and bells shouldn't rule your life as an adult. What's infuriating about old-fashioned workplace "late policies" is that they treat you like you like you're not an adult or that you somehow live in a world that isn't filled with the chaos of traffic, kids, and the occasional stomach virus.
  • 5 Tips for Overthinking Less and Enjoying Life More
    As busy adults living in our modern culture of overwork, we shoulder a lot of responsibilities, and we feel under a tremendous amount of pressure to attend to all of them properly on a day-in, day-out basis. But, those of us who are prone to overthinking also have to deal with an additional stressor – ourselves.
  • How Highly Do You Value a Good Paycheck vs. Mental Well-Being?
    This week on Reddit, Phoenixfighter09 talks to the /f/personalfinance community about his current job situation. Unhappy, stressed out, and exhausted from toxic co-workers, he's debating quitting his job of six months and taking a massive pay cut in hopes of pursuing his real passion while also salvaging his mental health and personal relationships. Should he stick it out or should he quit? Let's unpack the details in this all-too-common scenario.
  • Is Work-Life Balance Possible for Educators?
    Whether we're talking about elementary school teachers or professors at the university level, many educators are struggling to find work-life balance. There are some specific ways in which these jobs lend themselves to a kind of all-in approach that leaves one's personal life in the dust. Let's take a look at a few of the reasons why so many educators aren't finding their way to better work-life balance and think about potential solutions.
  • Here's Why Your Employer Should Be Promoting More Women
    A new study released by the Peterson Institute for International Economics and EY, the audit firm formerly known as Ernst & Young, shined an interesting light on the diversity problem in modern companies. First, they found a lack of women in the top seats at companies. Second, they found where that where women had been hired or promoted to top management roles, profits rose.
  • 'Presenteeism' Is Not Your Fault: Why Workers Come to Work Sick
    "If you're sick, stay home." You've heard that from experts ranging from the CDC, to WebMD, to your own mother. If you're lucky, you might even hear it from your boss. Still, many come to work sick, including over half of food service workers. The phenomenon is called "presenteeism," and researchers estimate that it costs employers $150 billion a year – more than either absenteeism or disability. So why do people go to work when they're sick? The reason why is pretty obvious: American workers feel they can't take time off, and a lot of the time, they're right.
  • 5 Things You Should Know About Working as a Nurse
    Some people are lucky enough to feel that they have a real calling toward one particular job or career field. Nurses tend to be these kinds of people. If you know someone with a profound desire to help others and a fierce work ethic and intellect to match, they just might work in nursing. But, while the job can be quite fulfilling, it's far from an easy career path. Let's get real about what it's like to work as a nurse in 2016. Here are a few things you should know.
  • Your Office Needs a Climbing Wall
    Silicon Valley workplace trends have been spilling out of California and into the rest of the country for quite some time now. Not surprisingly, researchers are starting to investigate the effects of these perks on workers' health, productivity, and happiness. One perk that might make the cut: an office climbing wall. Let's take a closer look at how you might benefit from having one at your workplace.
  • Depressed or Anxious? Blame the Gender Pay Gap
    Women are 70 percent more likely to suffer from depression than men, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and 83 percent of employed Americans consider this factor to be the number one barrier to workplace success, reports Diversity Woman. Discussions about why women are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety often focus on hormonal fluctuations or coping strategies. Now, new research suggests that part of the problem may actually be financial in nature.
  • Is a Lack of Leisure Time Holding You Back in Your Career?
    More American women are working full-time, but that doesn't mean that their family lives have caught up. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in households with children under 6, moms put in an hour of physical childcare per day, while dads did 23 minutes. The chore breakdown was similarly unequal; on an average day, women spent 47 more minutes per day on household activities like food prep and laundry. Why is this a big deal? Well, in addition to making it harder for women to put in extra time at the office and get ahead at work, lack of leisure time means less room for creativity and innovation.
  • Are 'Gigs' Really That Great?
    Being a freelancer is anything but free. Sorry to be a downer, but it's true. If you don't plan for the unexpected, you might be shocked when you overdraw from your bank account or spend way more than 40 hours a week at this job you thought was going to be a breeze. Take stock of the realities of gig life before you make the jump.
  • One Company Offers a Work-Life Balance Solution for Moms: Part-Time Jobs
    Being a working mother in America is no easy feat. Not only are there extremely limited or no paid leave options for a vast majority of working parents, but the high cost of childcare and long American workday force many women to leave their careers behind to care for their children. One company is trying to change that for working mothers. How? By giving moms the opportunity to work part-time.
  • 5 Signs You're Burning Out
    Burnout can impact just about anyone. But, people who are extra dedicated and committed to their jobs, or people working in particularly stressful and demanding positions, might be especially prone to it. If signs and symptoms of burnout go unaddressed, you could find yourself being forced to take a break from your job – whether you want to or not. So, let's take a look at a few common signs of burnout. Learning to recognize these signs, and slowing down accordingly, could help you save your career before it's too late.
  • Why You Should Care That More Women Are Working Full-Time
    Women have dominated part-time work for the past decade or so, and this has played a role in why the gender wage gap persists and why women are so underrepresented in upper-level, high-earning jobs. However, recent reports show that more women are making a shift from part-time to full-time work. This shift is great for the economy, of course – but, more importantly, it's an indicator that we are getting that much closer to workplace equality for working women in America. Here's what you need to know.
  • What's So Wrong With European Work Culture, Anyway?
    There's an unfortunate stereotype about Europe that often rears its head when politicians are talking about the U.S. economy and work culture. Comparisons with countries like France and Italy can characterize these European states as lazy, unmotivated, and dangerous for free market growth.

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