• New CareerBuilder Survey Reveals What HR Managers Know About the Gender Pay Gap
    The gender pay gap is a complex issue. In order to begin to understand the situation, it's important to appreciate the difference between what PayScale is calling the controlled and the uncontrolled gender pay gap. Not only do women earn less than men for equal work, they also do different jobs in the first place. The truth about the gender pay gap is that it's much more complicated than some people think.
  • America's Corporate Culture Is Too Stuck In Its Ways to Allow Paid Family Leave to Work
    The U.S. is one of the few countries in the world that doesn't mandate any kind of paid family leave, and only 12 percent of private-sector employees in this country have access to it. This is despite the increasing number of elite employers who offer generous perks designed to improve work-life balance. What will it take for paid family leave to truly gain traction in the U.S.? Beyond a law requiring it, we'd need nothing less than a complete cultural shift. Even if paid leave were to be granted tomorrow to every employee nationwide, there's one problem that would still remain: an unsupportive corporate culture that makes it hard to take time away from work to take care of family.
  • Unconscious Bias Is Happening Where You Least Expect It: At Your Workplace
    Recently, PayScale released data that show the gap between men and women's perceptions of equal opportunity at work. Based on 140,000 individual responses to the PayScale Salary Survey, the report showed that 75 percent of men say there's equal opportunity for men and women in their workplace – but only 51 percent of women say the same. The perception gap is even worse at tech companies, with 80 percent of men, but only 44 percent of women, saying that women have equal opportunities at their employer.
  • The 5 Jobs With the Worst Gender Pay Gap
    Men earn more than women in every industry, but some occupations have a worse gender pay gap than others. Recently, Time released their list of the 25 jobs with the biggest gap between male and female earnings. Let's take a closer look at the five jobs at the top of the list.
  • What We Can Learn From WalletHub's Best and Worst Cities for Women-Owned Businesses
    Starting a new business is anything but easy. It requires fierce motivation, novel ideas, capital, not to mention some jumping-through-of-hoops to get all of your appropriate paperwork together. For women business leaders, the challenge may be even a little greater. In response to this, WalletHub recently compiled their list of 2016's Best and Worst Cities for Women-Owned Businesses.
  • 5 Things You Can Do to Close the Gender Pay Gap, Starting Today
    Today is International Women's Day, a celebration of the struggle for women's rights that has been with us in one form or another since 1909. Nowadays, the U.N. designates themes for International Women's Day, such as "Women Uniting for Peace" (2000) and "Equal Rights, Equal Opportunities: Progress for All" (2010). Today's theme is "Planet 50-50 by 2030: Step It Up for Gender Equality." The UN's agenda specifies goals including ensuring access to free, quality primary and secondary education, and ending violence and discrimination against women and girls. It's a tall order, and one that will take concerted effort by the international community to achieve. But, there is something you can do right now to help reach the goal of equality by 2030: help end the gender pay gap in your workplace and home.
  • Would 'Period Leave' Help or Hurt Your Career?
    Sometimes it really feels like European companies are just showing off. In a time when American workers are lucky to get a few days of paid sick leave, one employer in the U.K. is offering a "period policy" that allows female workers to stay home during menstruation – without using up sick days. The idea is to improve productivity by "synchronizing work with the natural cycles of the body," says Bex Baxter, director of Coexist, the Bristol-based company.
  • 3 Obstacles That Keep Women From Succeeding in Tech
    The gender pay gap exists across all industries, but it's smallest in tech, according to PayScale's report, The Truth About the Gender Pay Gap. But, that doesn't mean that everything is easy for women at tech companies. Various systemic issues in the industry can keep women from succeeding – or even staying – in STEM fields. Here's what's holding women back.
  • Hollywood Is 'Sorority-Racist': Chris Rock Explains Unconscious Bias on Oscars Night

    Last night, during his opening monologue for the 88th Academy Awards, host Chris Rock gave perhaps the best explanation to date of unconscious bias and how it affects the careers of black actors. Hollywood, he said, isn't "burning-cross racist" or "fetch-me-some-lemonade racist." It's "sorority-racist."

    "Is Hollywood racist?" he asked. "You're damn right. Hollywood is racist, but it ain't that racist that you've grown accustomed to. Hollywood is sorority-racist. It's like, 'We like you, Rhonda, but you're not a Kappa.'"

  • Here's Why Your Employer Should Be Promoting More Women
    A new study released by the Peterson Institute for International Economics and EY, the audit firm formerly known as Ernst & Young, shined an interesting light on the diversity problem in modern companies. First, they found a lack of women in the top seats at companies. Second, they found where that where women had been hired or promoted to top management roles, profits rose.
  • Taylor Swift's Grammys Speech Is Good Career Advice for Young Women
    Forget music; Taylor Swift's biggest accomplishment might be inspiring her young, female fans not only to achieve their dreams, but to take credit for their accomplishments – and ignore the haters who try to diminish their success. Last night at the Grammys, Swift delivered perhaps the best response to Kanye West's claim that he "made that [insert sexist slur here] famous" by asserting her right to be recognized for her achievements ... and not even mentioning Yeezy by name.
  • Depressed or Anxious? Blame the Gender Pay Gap
    Women are 70 percent more likely to suffer from depression than men, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and 83 percent of employed Americans consider this factor to be the number one barrier to workplace success, reports Diversity Woman. Discussions about why women are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety often focus on hormonal fluctuations or coping strategies. Now, new research suggests that part of the problem may actually be financial in nature.
  • 3 Facts You Don't Know About #WomeninSTEM
    You know that STEM jobs are heavily male-dominated, and also – generally speaking – high-paying, high-growth occupations. The lack of representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math jobs is one reason why the gender pay gap persists. You've probably also heard that tech companies are trying various things to create a more diverse workforce, in terms of hiring and promoting women and people of color, from Slack's plan to build tools that catch inequities early on to Salesforce's $3 million commitment to closing its internal gender pay gap. But there's a lot you don't know about the history and current state of women in tech, in particular. Today, on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, let's take a look at some very nontrivial trivia.
  • Is a Lack of Leisure Time Holding You Back in Your Career?
    More American women are working full-time, but that doesn't mean that their family lives have caught up. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in households with children under 6, moms put in an hour of physical childcare per day, while dads did 23 minutes. The chore breakdown was similarly unequal; on an average day, women spent 47 more minutes per day on household activities like food prep and laundry. Why is this a big deal? Well, in addition to making it harder for women to put in extra time at the office and get ahead at work, lack of leisure time means less room for creativity and innovation.
  • 5 Reasons Why Your Employer Should Embrace Diversity
    Building a diverse company isn't just the right thing to do; according to research from Bersin by Deloitte, it's also pretty good for business. In a recent article for Forbes, contributor Josh Bersin wrote about why smart companies are making diversity and inclusion a top priority. Here's why your employer should be on board.
  • One Company Offers a Work-Life Balance Solution for Moms: Part-Time Jobs
    Being a working mother in America is no easy feat. Not only are there extremely limited or no paid leave options for a vast majority of working parents, but the high cost of childcare and long American workday force many women to leave their careers behind to care for their children. One company is trying to change that for working mothers. How? By giving moms the opportunity to work part-time.
  • Why You Should Care That More Women Are Working Full-Time
    Women have dominated part-time work for the past decade or so, and this has played a role in why the gender wage gap persists and why women are so underrepresented in upper-level, high-earning jobs. However, recent reports show that more women are making a shift from part-time to full-time work. This shift is great for the economy, of course – but, more importantly, it's an indicator that we are getting that much closer to workplace equality for working women in America. Here's what you need to know.
  • Obama Plans to Fight the Gender Pay Gap With Data
    Exactly seven years ago today, President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, amending the Civil Rights Act to alter the statute of limitations for discrimination claims. It was the first bill he signed into law as president, and an important tool for women fighting to close the gender pay gap. Today, Obama extends those protections by announcing a new rule to require companies with 100 or more employees to furnish the government with pay data on gender, race, and ethnicity.
  • Negotiating While Female: How to Get the Salary You Deserve
    First things first: despite what you might have heard, women are not worse negotiators than men. They're not even that much less likely to ask for a raise. Data collected for PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide showed that women reported negotiating salary nearly as often as men: 42 percent of women and 45 percent of men said they'd asked for a raise in their current field. However, research has shown that women are penalized more severely in terms of social costs when they engage in behaviors that appear "aggressive" or "unlikeable" – such as, for example, asking for more cash.
  • Companies Insist on Collaboration, So Women Do More
    In workplaces around the country, it's not uncommon for employers to encourage or even insist on a collaborative environment. In fact, studies show that time spent on collaborative tasks in the office rose by roughly 50 percent over the last 20 years. However, there's just one little problem: women are the ones getting stuck with the bulk of the work.

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