• Hey, Men: Gender Equality Is Good for You Too!
    In his TED Talk last spring, Michael Kimmel spoke about something he knows something about: men and privilege. Not only is he a middle-class white male (arguably the most privileged since the dawn of time, by his estimation), but he's also a sociologist and author who studies how equality (or lack thereof) affects everyone, not just those left out in the cold.
  • To See How Few Women There Are at the Top, Photoshop Out the Men
    If you watched the Democratic primary debate last night, one thing probably stood out to you, regardless of your political leanings: Hillary Clinton was the only woman on the stage. In fact, as far as American politics is concerned, one out of five is just about the norm: currently, women hold 104 out of 535 seats in Congress, a 19.4 percent average. (It gets worse if you look at women of color – 31.7 percent of the number of women, and just 6.2 percent of the total.) Of course, we love data, but numbers can seem abstract. Sometimes, you can't beat a good visualization to really see the problem. Recently, British Elle's feminism issue gave us just that, with a video that shows men gradually removed from photos of politics in action ... leaving just a few women behind.
  • Jennifer Lawrence Speaks Out About the Gender Pay Gap
    Jennifer Lawrence is known for being a badass, whether she's on the big screen fighting a dystopian civil war or railing against body shaming to Barbara Walters. Cripes, she's won an Oscar and been nominated for two more, PLUS she's the lead in a billion-dollar grossing movie trilogy (and a half) and she just turned 25! With a no-nonsense head on her shoulders, she's made waves a few times in Hollywood for speaking her mind, but she hasn't spoken out about the gender pay gap, until now.
  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Offers Employees 52 Weeks Paid Parental Leave
    Who says extended parental leave is just for tech companies like Netflix or Microsoft? The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation recently announced a new parental leave policy of 52 paid weeks for mothers or fathers during the first year after the birth or adoption of a child, plus unlimited time off for all employees.
  • Key Results of the 2015 Women In the Workplace Study
    Women in the Workplace, a recent study conducted by and McKinsey & Company – building off of similar work done by the latter in 2012 – examines the current state of women in corporate America. Over 100 companies and nearly 30,000 employees participated. The survey results and accompanying data shed some light on the fact that women are still underrepresented at every level of corporate life, and the study goes a step further, examining the root causes of the problem. Let's take a closer look at a few of the key findings.
  • Apply the Bechdel Test at Your Next Meeting to Evaluate Gender Diversity at Work
    China's President Xi Jinping recent visit to Seattle was big news for what it signified about the city's rising prominence as a global tech hotspot. But a quick survey of photographs of the Chinese dignitary hob-knobbing with executives in the Emerald City reveals that while more companies are talking about their lack of female executives, it's pretty obvious that we haven't made great strides in actually solving the problem and fostering workplaces where women can rise to leadership roles as easily as men.
  • 3 Alarming Facts About the Current State of Workplace Inequality
    Workplace inequality may sound like some "oh, woe is me" sob story that women are, well, sobbing about, but the reality of the situation is much more serious than most of us would like to admit. It's 2015 and women still earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. So what's holding women back in their careers?
  • Women, Here Are 4 Ways to Stop Giving Away Power
    We're taught from a young age that "femininity" is synonymous with being demure, quiet, pleasing, and friendly. But bosses often need a kind of take-charge attitude that maintains your powerful role as a knowledgeable person. So how do you keep the power and your upward mobility as a woman in the workplace? How do you avoid being stuck between a rock and the glass ceiling? Here are some tips:
  • Men Nap at Work, Zone Out During Meetings More Than Women
    Unless you're a raving extrovert – or a manager who needs something to put on that annual review – you probably hate meetings. For the vast majority of office workers, they're essentially time away from the real work that makes up the bulk of our jobs. But a recent survey shows that men are more likely to respond to a boring meeting by doing something else entirely, whether it's check email, text, or play fantasy sports. Are women just super responsible, or what's going on?
  • To Fix Parental Leave, Make It Possible for Dads to Take It
    America's parental leave situation is dire. As you probably know, America is the only industrialized nation in the world that does not offer paid parental leave to workers, so working parents are forced to use accumulated vacation and sick hours to ensure some sort of income during their time off. Even if parents are lucky enough to have paid parental leave, they might not take it all. Why? In part, it's because dads often head back to work, even before their leave is up.
  • Women Show More Stress in Male-Dominated Jobs
    One might be the loneliest number, but it's a regular fact when you're a woman working in a male-dominated field. What's more, recent studies that women in such fields (where 85 percent of their colleagues are men) show increased signs of social stress.
  • 5 Amazing Perks for New Parents That Actually Exist
    They say it takes a village to raise a baby, but what happens when mom and dad have to leave the village and return to work? Making the transition from "new parents" to "new parents who also have to work a full-time jobs" is no easy feat, and many new parents find it so difficult and costly that one chooses to put their career on hold to be the primary caregiver instead. Wouldn't it be nice if companies offered perks that helped make the transition for working parents a tad bit easier? Believe it or not, some companies do. Here is a list of the five incredible perks for working parents and the companies that so graciously offer them.
  • The No. 1 Thing You Should Never Do on LinkedIn: Be a Creeper
    Using social media to build your professional network is both an art and a science. Learn all you can about how to optimize your profile, catch the attention of both bots and human HR folks, and introduce yourself in the right way to the right people, but in the end, there's always a hefty amount of gut feeling involved with building your brand online. Too bad, then, that sometimes our guts (or those of our potential connections) are so very, very dumb.
  • #SmartGirlsAsk Changes the Conversation on the Emmys Red Carpet
    Why should we care what journalists ask celebrities on the red carpet? Because if all girls see are women being valued for fitting into a designer dress and having access to the best professional grooming money can buy, it's just a little bit harder for them to picture themselves growing up to find a seat at the conference table. In the past year, the #AskHerMore campaign on Twitter has encouraged journalists to ask actresses about their accomplishments, not their manicures; last night, Amy Poehler's Smart Girls organization took the trend one step further with #SmartGirlsAsk.
  • 5 Signs That Now's the Time for Millennial Women to Shine in Their Careers
    Working women continue to be steadfast in their fight for gender equality in the workplace. And, it's paying off, especially for millennials, who now have the greatest support of any generation of women. Here are a few signs that it's time for millennial women to break the glass ceiling once and for all.
  • The Controversial Maternity Leaves of Marissa Mayer
    Yahoo's CEO Marissa Mayer plans to take limited time away after giving birth to her twins. She's a high-powered businesswoman, and she's done this before. (This is her second pregnancy, and she took just two weeks off last time.) Is she a heroine, someone we should all look up to – or is she part of the problem?
  • The Hidden Costs of Makeup: Taxed If You Wear It and Taxed If You Don't
    The gender wage gap is an enduring problem that has attracted much attention. But lately, researchers have been taking a closer look at some other, less well-known gender disparities. A recent article in The Atlantic discussed the fact that women who choose not to wear makeup at work may lose out on promotions, salaries, and other benefits, while women who do wear makeup might reap the benefits, but lose time, money, and sleep. For women in the workplace, it seems, makeup is a mixed bag.
  • When You Are the Minority at Work
    It's the first day of work and you're meeting with your new team; while it doesn't immediately strike you at first, you realize soon enough that perhaps you are the only person of color, the only man, the only woman, or the only person of a different faith in the room. It's not an easy start, but you will be able to make it work. Here are a few ways you can avoid isolation and any preconceived biases toward you and your efforts.
  • 4 Working Moms Share the Reality of Maternity Leave in the US
    Last month, we asked working parents to share their experiences with taking parental leave in the US. The responses, which came from people in occupations as diverse as librarian and banker, showed what most of us already know: the United States has a long way to go when it comes to leave for new parents. While top tech employers like Netflix and Microsoft might dangle months or even a year of paid leave, most working parents are left cobbling together disability, vacation time, and FMLA leave – if they're lucky enough to qualify.
  • 5 Things You Didn't Know About FMLA
    The purpose of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is to help employees balance work and personal or medical needs. It was passed in 1993 during the Clinton administration as a way to protect the jobs of workers who needed to take time off to care for themselves or family members, including babies. (The U.S. is the only industrialized country in the world that does not offer paid maternity leave.) Workers who are contemplating taking leave often find themselves confused about what the FMLA does and doesn't cover. Here's what you need to know.

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