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  • Bill Would Allow Companies to Fire Unwed Mothers
    The recent Supreme Court ruling that determined same-sex couples have the same marriage rights as opposite-sex couples has been met with both celebration and consternation. On the consternation side, the most immediate outcome has been in the form of the First Amendment Defense Act, a bill with the stated purpose of protecting employers from discrimination, if they act "in accordance with a religious belief or moral conviction that marriage is or should be recognized as the union of one man and one woman, or that sexual relations are properly reserved to such a marriage." This would obviously have big implications for same-sex couples, but it would also potentially affect other workers whose personal lives don't match their employers' beliefs, including unmarried women who have children.
  • Women Study Computer Science, So Why Are There So Few Women in Tech?
    Recent studies show that a vast majority of female students are interested enough in tech to study it in college, however, the number of women in tech careers doesn't reflect that – not even by a long shot. Let's take a look at why so many women fall off the tech career path before even choosing a major.
  • Ladies, Here's the Key to Not Feeling Guilty About Negotiating a Raise
    Negotiating a raise is no easy feat, especially for women who are crippled by the stigma that negotiating makes them greedy, bossy, or ungrateful. Read on to learn how to reverse those feelings of guilt and turn them into the fuel you need to get the salary you've rightfully earned and deserve.
  • 4 Ways Finances Affect Women Differently Than Men in Their Careers
    It's a fact. Women are more likely to discuss health issues than financial matters, but the reason why isn't as obvious as you may think. Yes, women tend to be more open about personal stuff than men, but the reason they refrain from money talks is because they feel insecure about their "lack of financial knowledge and experience," and don't know "where to turn for guidance," says a recent study. Let's take a look at four factors that contribute to the financial insecurities that are unique to women in their careers.
  • Ellen Pao's Reddit Resignation Reveals the Enduring Sexism of Tech
    Picture this: a new CEO makes a series of controversial changes to the company's hiring process, policies, and product. Eventually, a popular staffer is fired, and the community revolts, starting a Change.org petition, a hashtag campaign on social media, and even sending death threats. Sound surreal? It might be – if the CEO were male. As former Reddit CEO Ellen Pao's resignation demonstrates, it's not at all a strange set of circumstances for a woman in charge.
  • Stop Overworking Everyone : A Better Way to End the Gender Wage Gap?
    Women still earn less money than men, in part, because they're more likely to seek out flexible schedules that allow them to combine work and household responsibilities. But, that doesn't mean that men are necessarily psyched to burn the midnight oil – at least, not every midnight. Perhaps the best way to tackle the gender wage gap and the work-life balance problem is to examine why our culture of work demands such round-the-clock devotion from everyone, both male and female.
  • 4 Essential Tips for a Successful Remote Work Setup
    Many people dream about escaping the drudgery of office life and working from home, but the truth is, remote work has its own kind of drudgery – and some serious challenges. The key to success is understanding and dealing with some of the most common distractions you'll face when working remotely. Here's how to get started.
  • 3 Career Lessons From the US Women's World Cup Victory
    What does a soccer game have to do with your career? If the soccer game in question is last night's World Cup clincher and you're a working woman, a lot. Most of us probably won't experience what it's like to be a world-class athlete fighting for dominance on a global playing field, but even if you're not a sports fan of any stripe, you can learn a lot from the US women's national soccer team.
  • A Growing Crop of Female Versions of the Old Boy's Club Make Waves Online
    From T. Swift's smoking hot girl army to Tina Fey and Amy Poehler's whip-smart comic partnership, to Zooey Deschanel, Molly McAleer, and Sophia Rossi's infectious Hello Giggles girl-power lifestyle hub, female friendship-based collaborations are nothing new. What is new is the increasing number of collaboration-based opportunities that female professionals now have that can further their careers and actually put cash in the bank. A growing crop of increasingly specialized, made-for-women-by-women virtual communities like CodeChix and The Li.st offer opportunities that range from job referrals to speaking gigs to potential investors. Read on for a round-up of veterans and newcomers both big and small.
  • Want Your Kids to Be Successful? Don't Quit Your Day Job, Says Harvard Study
    Listen up, working moms. It's time to put your guilt-ridden thoughts aside and start celebrating the fact that you are a mother with a thriving career, because children of working moms are more successful than their peers. Says who? Harvard Business School, that's who. Here's what you need to know.
  • Everyone Needs Work-Life Balance, Not Just Women
    A national conversation around the issue of work-life balance has really taken root lately, and it has everyone talking about what can be done to better things moving forward. However, when we think about work-life balance, we should be mindful that it's an important issue for all adults – not just women. Here are some things to think about.
  • Women Apologize Too Much. Here's How to Stop.
    When you're a kid, the message about apologies is clear: when you're wrong – or even if you hurt someone by mistake – say you're sorry. The problem is, as kids grow into adults, one half of the human race seems to retain the message ... while the other half reserves their apologies for special occasions. (You know which is which.) Why, exactly, do women feel that they must apologize all the time, and how can they curb the impulse, especially at work?
  • LinkedIn Is Being the Change It Wants to See for Women in Tech
    The bad news is that STEM has a woman problem. The good news is that everyone is pretty aware of it now and some companies are trying to fix this problem. Last year, LinkedIn announced its Women in Tech (WIT) initiative, which aims to empower the women in tech roles at the company to transform themselves, their careers, and the company – and, by golly, it seems to be working! We'll take a look at how LinkedIn is "tackling this imbalance head-on" and making a difference for women in tech, now and in the future.
  • What Nasty Gal Can Teach Us About the Importance of Corporate Culture
    If there's anyone who understands the term "rags to riches," it's Nasty Gal founder Sophia Amoruso, who built an online apparel empire from the ground up. However, according to some current and former Nasty Gal employees, the company's once-vibrant corporate culture isn't what it used to be, thanks to layoffs and restructuring. We'll examine how a company's culture can quickly go south and how to protect yourself from being blindsided in your career.
  • Queen Bee Syndrome Is Not a Thing
    Women, amirite? When they're not weeping or scheming, they're tearing each other down at work. Or, at least, that's how the theory goes. It's called Queen Bee Syndrome, and it's occupied a place in workplace lore for as long as women have been represented in the labor force. There's just one problem. A recent study shows that it's probably not true.
  • Tweet Like a Man, and Get More Retweets
    A recent study showed that men get retweeted more than women. The question is, why? We'll examine the science behind why tweets published by men are, on average, more popular than those by women and how professionals can apply this knowledge to their enhance their career potential, regardless of gender.
  • The Best #DistractinglySexy Tweets

    After Nobel Prize winner Sir Tim Hunt made headlines with a long, public and shockingly sexist diatribe about why he thought women were more of a distraction than a benefit in labs, hundreds of female scientists have taken to Twitter to call him out on his comments. These female STEM workers are posting photos of themselves at work, decked out in their daily uniforms of lab coats, hazmat suits, hairnets and goggles, with the hashtag #DistractinglySexy

  • All Stay-at-Home Parents Should Get a 'Wife Bonus'
    Someday, Dorothy will pull back the curtain on the internet and we'll discover not a man pulling levers, but the greatest communication tool of the 21st century, entirely powered by human outrage. Look no further than the recent flap over social researcher Wednesday Martin's forthcoming book Primates of Park Avenue, which examines the phenomenon of the "glam SAHM" – real Real Housewives who probably don't change a lot of diapers, but spend their time managing the careers of the future one percent. The inspiration for the furor? Like their financier husbands, these ladies apparently get a cash bonus for their efforts.
  • 5 Things Working Mothers Really Want in Their Careers
    Women comprise nearly half of today's workforce. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 47.7 percent of households are dual-income, with both the husband and wife working. What's more, approximately 70 percent of these women are also mothers, who handle a vast majority of the household responsibilities along with their careers. It's not surprising, then, that working mothers are struggling to keep up with the high demands of juggling their personal and professional lives simultaneously. Here's what working mothers need in order to get a fair shot at attaining their goals in and out of the workplace.
  • 3 Ways Veep's Amy Brookheimer Is Every Working Woman's Hero
    Unconscious bias really screws things up for women in the workplace, but the battle is not over just yet. Thanks to the prevalence of more leading ladies on the big screen and on TV who play strong, successful working women, the unconscious bias isn't so unconscious anymore. We'll take a look at three ways Veep's powerhouse character, Amy Brookheimer, is showing working women everywhere that being tenacious, unapologetic, and "bossy" is nothing to be afraid of in their careers.