• Why Do We Rank Schools? Vote for PayScale at SXSW, and Find Out
    How does South by Southwest pick its panels? By asking the internet to choose which of its most burning questions deserves an answer first. This year, PayScale has three potential sessions up for your approval: The Rankers on College Rankings: Why We Do It; How To Diversify Tech & Hack Our Unconscious Bias; and How Working in a Social Agency Made Me Hate Social. Use the SXSW PanelPicker, and tell organizers what you need to know.
  • Adobe Offers More Paid Parental Leave
    Netflix and Microsoft have already paved the way, but now Adobe announced that it's joining the other top tech companies in offering more paid leave to parents. Their leave package is now at 26 weeks (10 weeks of medical leaven and 16 weeks of parental leave) – that's double what they offered in the past, but it's not even really a surprise.
  • The Evolution of Gender-Based Career Quizzes
    The use of polarized language as a source of polarized ideas is nothing new. A classic case in point: The Quiz. Though the decision to have a career, a spouse, and/or children is clearly an individual and entirely subjective one, magazines throughout time have provided readers with the sometimes dangerous ability to define their identity, beliefs, and capabilities on the basis of arbitrary questions about life choices. Though such quizzes are silly and pointless when taken literally, comparing the gender-related values represented in contemporary women's magazine quizzes to those that showed up in publications from the 1950s is an interesting exercise that shows how views of women and their careers have shifted, and, for the most part, improved.
  • 5 Ways Working Moms and Dads Can Manage Their Households Like a CEO
    You're probably familiar with articles discussing how "mom skills" translate well in the workplace, especially when it comes to multitasking and prioritizing. However, you don’t hear much about the other way around. In this post, we'll take a look at five ways working parents can use their skills to keep a happy, orderly home.
  • Women Over 65 Are Twice as Likely to Live in Poverty
    The gender wage gap is a persistent problem that's taking a long time to solve. The fact is that on average, women earn about 78 cents for each dollar brought in by men. And, new data suggest that this is having a significant effect on the state of women's finances in retirement.
  • 5 Inspiring Quotes From Young Female Entrepreneurs
    "Anything you can do, I can do better. I can do anything better than you." There are two types of women in the world: those who find those lyrics conceited and arrogant, and those who see those words as fuel to catapult them towards their dreams. In this post, we'll cover five young female entrepreneurs who believed they could do anything better … and did. Here are some of their inspiring words about breaking down barriers and stereotypes to turn their little ideas into big, big business.
  • Bad News, Men: Robots Are Coming for Your Jobs, Specifically
    The robots are coming, and they're going to scoop up some, most, or hardly any of our jobs, depending on which expert you're listening to and which data they're using. What a potential automated takeover would mean for mankind is up for debate, but recent research shows that it's probably mankind, and not womankind, that needs to worry. If robots do take over our jobs, Oxford researchers say, they'll come for the ones that are most often done by men.
  • Microsoft Doubles Maternity Leave, Increases Paid Parental Leave
    A day after Netflix announced it would offer a year of unlimited, fully paid leave to all new parents, Microsoft announced improvements to its own parental leave policy, as well as increasing 401(k) match and adding paid holidays to the company calendar.
  • 5 Working Parents Share What It's Really Like to Use Parental Leave
    Last night, Netflix announced what may well be the most generous parental leave policy in the country – which isn't saying much, given that the U.S. mandates no paid leave, and offers only 12 weeks of unpaid time off for new parents. To get a sense of how radical (and unusual) policies like these are, we asked working parents in a variety of industries to share their experiences of the state of parental leave in the United States today.
  • Netlix Offers 'Unlimited' Year of Paid Maternity and Paternity Leave
    The United States is one of only four countries in the world that doesn't guarantee any paid leave for new parents. Americans who work for the government or private companies with 50 or more employees are usually covered under the Family and Medical Leave Act, which allows 12 weeks of unpaid leave in a 12-month period – but when expenses are higher than ever before, families are often hard-pressed to use unpaid leave. As a result, employers in competitive niches like tech use paid parental leave as a way to woo in-demand talent, with giants like Google and Facebook often topping the list. On Tuesday, Netflix announced a paid parental leave policy that would make even the most pampered employees green with envy: unlimited time off, at full pay, after the birth or adoption of a child.
  • Here's Why Your Office Is So Cold
    If you're a woman and work in an office, you're probably longing for fall, and not because you enjoy autumnal fashion and Pumpkin Spice Lattes. No, for many of us, the end of summer will mean the end of freezing to death under the arctic blast of the office air conditioning. Before you roll your eyes, menfolks and other warm-blooded people, go put your hands in the freezer for a few minutes and then come back and try to type something. We'll wait. When you return, cast your eyes on the abstract of a recent study, published in the journal Climate Change and entitled Energy Consumption in Buildings and Female Thermal Demand, which demonstrates what many female office workers have been saying for years: the office thermostat is set with men in mind.
  • The Cardinals' New Hire Can Teach Managers All Something About Good Candidates
    "Fifteen years of experience playing football, first woman to play with men, and doctorate in psychology — I hope I can figure out something to contribute in there." That's what Dr. Jen Welter had to say when a reporter asked the new Arizona Cardinals assistant coaching intern, "What can you offer?" It's the kind of question managers should be asking every candidate up for a new job — but her answer, power-packed as it is, really only scratches the surface.
  • Can You Guess How Many Female CEOs There Are in the World?
    If you can't name the right number, don't worry: neither can executives. The 1,700 participants of a Weber Shandwick study guessed that 23 percent of CEOs at large companies were women. Take a look at the embarrassing results of the study and the shocking truth of how few female CEOs actually exist today.
  • Does the Boss's Gender Change How Men Negotiate Salary?
    Salary negotiation is important. The salary you command at the start of a new job impacts your pay for the remainder of your time with the company, and possibly beyond. Over time, not negotiating can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost pay. Furthermore, people who ask for raises earn more than those who don't. We know that women are less likely to negotiate than men, but gender can also impact negotiation from the other side of the table. Recent research suggests that men negotiate differently when their boss is a woman.
  • No, Millennial Women Aren't Taking a 'Career Pause'
    We've all heard the myth of the "career pause" – it's used as an excuse when bosses decide not to hire young women. To explain it in the simplest terms, it's the idea that a woman will plan to take time off from her career to raise a family, in some modern iteration of the cult of domesticity. After all, bosses (and journalists) claim, young women will just get pregnant, and go on leave. Then, they'll stay home, need a flex-schedule, choose a lesser job, or in other ways divert from what could be considered a standard career path.
  • 5 Reasons Millennial Women Are Saying 'I Do' to Their Careers Instead of Marriage
    Did you know that 25 percent of today's young adults will likely never have been married by the time they reach their mid-40s to mid-50s? We'll take a look at why so many millennials prefer to marry their careers rather than their significant others.
  • Bill Would Allow Companies to Fire Unwed Mothers
    The recent Supreme Court ruling that determined same-sex couples have the same marriage rights as opposite-sex couples has been met with both celebration and consternation. On the consternation side, the most immediate outcome has been in the form of the First Amendment Defense Act, a bill with the stated purpose of protecting employers from discrimination, if they act "in accordance with a religious belief or moral conviction that marriage is or should be recognized as the union of one man and one woman, or that sexual relations are properly reserved to such a marriage." This would obviously have big implications for same-sex couples, but it would also potentially affect other workers whose personal lives don't match their employers' beliefs, including unmarried women who have children.
  • Women Study Computer Science, So Why Are There So Few Women in Tech?
    Recent studies show that a vast majority of female students are interested enough in tech to study it in college, however, the number of women in tech careers doesn't reflect that – not even by a long shot. Let's take a look at why so many women fall off the tech career path before even choosing a major.
  • Ladies, Here's the Key to Not Feeling Guilty About Negotiating a Raise
    Negotiating a raise is no easy feat, especially for women who are crippled by the stigma that negotiating makes them greedy, bossy, or ungrateful. Read on to learn how to reverse those feelings of guilt and turn them into the fuel you need to get the salary you've rightfully earned and deserve.
  • 4 Ways Finances Affect Women Differently Than Men in Their Careers
    It's a fact. Women are more likely to discuss health issues than financial matters, but the reason why isn't as obvious as you may think. Yes, women tend to be more open about personal stuff than men, but the reason they refrain from money talks is because they feel insecure about their "lack of financial knowledge and experience," and don't know "where to turn for guidance," says a recent study. Let's take a look at four factors that contribute to the financial insecurities that are unique to women in their careers.