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  • 3 Money Rules for New Entrepreneurs

    Starting a business is as frightening as it is exciting. For some, it is the dream of a lifetime and bolsters them into financial independence. If you want to start (or already have started!) your own business, take heed of these three financial pearls of wisdom, and remind yourself of them every day.

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  • Low Wages Are Poverty Wages

    How would you like to put in full-time hours at your job, work hard to perform your job well, manage your household, and yet still spend time waiting in lines for general assistance and charity to pay for your basic expenses, including food and heat? If you are a member of the growing population of minimum- and low-wage workers, this could be you. And the problem affects all of us.

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  • CEOs Received Smaller Raises Last Year

    The top CEOs in the US got a 1 percent raise last year, according to disclosures from 46 companies in the Standard & and Poor's 500. The previous year, CEOs' pay jumped 15 percent.

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  • The Most Important Part of the Job Interview (That You're Probably Forgetting)

    If you're at all interested in getting a given job, you prepare thoroughly ahead of time, researching the company and position, doing practice interview questions, even choosing your interview outfit with special care. But there's one thing you probably aren't doing, and it might be costing you the job: odds are, you probably haven't given a thought about how to close the interview.

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  • The 5 Things Great Managers Do Every Day

    If you've ever left a job because of a bad manager -- and you wouldn't be the first -- you know that having a good boss is an essential factor for job satisfaction and productivity. If you've ever managed everyone yourself, you know how hard it is to do well. Sometimes, it's hard to even understand what managing well entails. But recent analysis from Gallup shows that managers who do certain very specific things improve employee engagement, benefiting both workers and the company.

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  • 5 Ways to Be Luckier at Work

    Even if you're not particularly superstitious, it's easy to ascribe the things that happen to you in your career to luck (either good or bad). In fact, you can make your own good luck at work, just by making a few simple changes in your life.

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  • Another Great Reason to Help Others: It'll Help Your Career

    "Nice guys finish last." It's the real-life version of reality TV's favorite canard, "I'm not here to make friends" -- and it's probably just as useless as a personal motto. In his recent article in The Atlantic, Adam Grant argues that doing good things for others can have real benefits for your career -- eventually.

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  • 5 Ways to Kill Productivity in Your Next Meeting

    Ah, meetings. Ostensibly a way to communicate decisions, brainstorm ideas, and keep the team running in the same direction, they are also one of the better ways to allow productivity to grind to a halt. Ideally, we'd all make the best of meetings, and avoid behaviors that waste everyone's time and the company's money. In reality, of course, many of us are guilty of at least one of the following:

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  • Should Your Internship Be Paid?

    Getting that coveted internship is an exciting time for any graduate student on her way toward graduation and professional employment. Sometimes an internship is a valuable training experience that readies the student for real-world challenges in her field; other times, it is the equivalent of feudal serfdom. Internships can be unpaid, and as such are subject to strict laws and boundaries under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA.) Spot the warning signs and tell the difference between true professionals who are willing to help train you, and unscrupulous employers who simply want to take advantage of slave labor.

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  • How to Lead When You're Not the Boss

    Managing people when you're actually in charge of them is far from easy, but at least you have a variety of carrots and/or sticks to bring into play. When you're the technical lead on a project, but not actually the boss, things get confusing in a hurry.

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  • No More Written Resumes?

    Gone are the days when choosing card stock was an essential part of the resume process. Sure, you probably print out a couple couples of your CV to bring with you to job interviews, but for the most part, resume distribution takes place electronically. Thanks to social networking, LinkedIn in particular, formal resumes -- even electronic versions -- are less important than they used to be. Will there ever come a time when we do away with them altogether?

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  • When Should You Think About Changing Your Career?

    Your last week on the job has been completely frustrating. Nothing seems to be good enough for the boss. Maybe this is not the career you want to be in; maybe you’d be happier doing something else. Maybe you should get back to painting, or doing theater, something you were passionate about in school. But hold on, don’t quit just yet. Here are a few tips that would help figure out if a career switch is right for you.
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  • Treadmill Desks Make Employees Better at Their Jobs (Eventually)

    New research shows that treadmill desks improve employee performance and productivity -- after a short period of adjusting to walking and working at the same time.

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  • Senate Reaches Bipartisan Deal on Long-Term Unemployment Benefits

    Yesterday, the Senate announced a bill that would extend unemployment benefits for the two million Americans whose benefits lapsed in December, for a period of five months.

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  • 3 Memory Tricks to Become Smarter and More Productive

    Improving our memory skills increases productivity at work and, in general, makes our lives a little easier. From remembering where we stashed our keys to remembering the boss's detailed instructions, the following tips and tricks will make us work smarter and be more productive. How many of these are you familiar with?

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  • Female Professor Negotiates, Then Loses, Job Offer

    Women routinely fail to negotiate starting salaries and benefits, out of fear that their future employers will think them greedy and rescind the job offer. Most of the time, experts tell us, there's nothing to worry about. And then, every so often, there's a story like this.

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  • 5 Tips for Managing People You Can't Stand

    Here's one thing to know for certain, when you become a manager: sooner or later, you're going to have manage someone you don't like, or at least, disagree with frequently. This would be true even if you got to hand-pick every single member of your team. The goal, then, is to learn how to manage all your reports -- even the ones that set your teeth on edge -- in a way that maximizes productivity and is fair to all involved.

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  • The Question That Helps You Build a Better LinkedIn Network

    When should you send someone a request to connect on LinkedIn? As the recent case of Kelly Blazek makes clear, it's not always so clear cut. Blazek responded to a blind connection request with what many felt was an inappropriate amount of fury, finishing her message with "don't ever write me again." On the other hand, as anyone who's ever weeded through an overflowing inbox on LinkedIn can attest, the sheer volume of requests from strangers can be overwhelming -- and worse, defeat the purpose of joining the network in the first place.

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  • Does Listening to Music Help or Hurt Productivity?

    If you want to start a fight at your next team meeting, just ask the group if they think listening to music helps them work better -- or totally kills their concentration. In no time at all, you'll have people lined up on two sides of the room, snapping their fingers and advancing on one another in a menacing fashion, like Sharks and Jets in button-down shirts.

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  • Tweetenfreude: How Following People We Love to Hate Can Help Our Careers

    Can hate-following be good for your career? It can, if you do it the right way. "Tweetenfreude," coined by Saya Weissman at Digiday, refers to the charge we get out of following people we dislike. While it might seem like a waste of time and productivity, there are some surprising ways to make the hate-follow work for you and your job.

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