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  • Tweetenfreude: How Following People We Love to Hate Can Help Our Careers

    Can hate-following be good for your career? It can, if you do it the right way. "Tweetenfreude," coined by Saya Weissman at Digiday, refers to the charge we get out of following people we dislike. While it might seem like a waste of time and productivity, there are some surprising ways to make the hate-follow work for you and your job.

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  • Happy Birthday, Internet! 10 Ways the World Wide Web Changed Jobs Forever

    Twenty-five years ago today, Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote a paper that proposed the basic concept and structure of what we now know as the internet. Our personal and professional lives would never be the same.

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  • President Obama Wants YOU to Receive Overtime Pay

    Good news coming down the pike for the millions of American workers who have been exempted from overtime pay. The New York Times reports that tomorrow, Thursday, March 13, President Obama will direct the federal Department of Labor to stop classifying a series of jobs as "professional" or "executive." How will this affect you?

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  • Job Hopping Is the New Normal

    Gone are the days when workers toiled for the same company from graduation until retirement, heading off into their golden years with a watch and a pension. Today's workforce changes jobs more often than ever: one survey found that at least 21 percent of full-time workers plan on changing their jobs in 2014. According to some experts, that's just fine.

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  • What Not to Leave Behind After an Interview

    When you're interviewing for jobs, it’s important to be remembered. Oftentimes employers must weed through stacks of resumes and cover letters after days of interviews with prospective employees whose lists of experiences, training, and skills are all painfully similar. In these instances, the right Leave-Behind can become a valuable tool in giving a positive impression and boosting you above the rest of the applicants. The wrong Leave-Behind, however, could hurt your chances of being hired.
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  • Want a Raise? Be a Man

    Men still earn more than women across the globe. Here in the U.S., the most recited figure is 77 cents for a woman, for every dollar earned by a man. In Sweden, the difference between male and female pay works out to be about 250,000 euros over the course of a lifetime. Kommunal, the country's largest union, teamed up with ad agency Volontaire to create a video to highlight the gender pay gap that still exists today, even in one of the most socially progressive countries in the world.

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  • How to Write an Email That Gets a Recruiter's Attention

    As the volume of communication increases, and technology makes it possible to scan and dismiss more emails than we'll ever open, getting a hiring manager's attention is harder than ever before. But there are a few things you can do to make sure your emails don't wind up in the discard pile -- or worse, the spam folder.

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  • 7 Mistakes on Social Media That Could Be Hurting Your Job Search

    More employers are checking out the social media profiles of applicants to weed out undesirable candidates. So while you may be proud of your 500+ Facebook friends or your 1000+ followers on Twitter, make sure your awesome virtual social life is not killing your career.

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  • Those Unpaid Security Screenings Might Not Be Legal

    Does your employer require you to go through a security screening before you go on the clock? If so, they might be breaking the law -- but if they are, they're not alone. Employees who work for companies that require security screenings often are not compensated for time spent being screened. Just a few years ago, groups of employees started filing suit against their employers for wage theft. Their basic argument was, of course, that they should be compensated for time given to the employer. If you are ever expected to give up your time without being compensated, here is what you need to know.

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  • Do Employers Still Care About Tattoos and Piercings?

    Many career counselors still tell their clients to avoid adding any body art they can't cover up for a job interview, but every time you see a news segment on a creative industry, half the people on the screen are covered in ink and flashing bits of metal. What gives?

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  • Is a Career in Positive Psychology Right for You?

    Positive psychology, the study of what makes life worth living, is one of the newest branches of the social sciences. According to positive psychology, we have the ability to create and determine happiness, which is a thing in itself, and not just the absence of depression. Sound empowering? Positive psychology is making its way into corporate environments, which is good news if you're a worker of any sort, or interested in getting involved in a career using positive psychology in the workplace.
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  • Women's Jobs Are Less Flexible Than Men's

    Why do women make less money than men? One theory has been that it's because they pursue careers that will allow them to opt out of the workforce for a few years to raise children, or else combine work and parenting by adopting a more flexible schedule. There's just one problem: a recent study found that women's jobs are less flexible, more poorly paid, and yes, more stressful than men's.

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  • Are You Making This Time Management Mistake?

    Social media is inescapable at this point. Working people use it for everything from staying current on trends in their industry to building their personal brand. But used the wrong way, social media can be more of a time suck than a boon to your career.

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  • Employer Access to Social Media Accounts: What Does Your State Say?

    The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCLS) keeps tabs on what's new in each of the 50 states. Beginning in 2012, some state lawmakers introduced legislation protecting employees from being required to give up their social media account passwords in order to get or keep a job. And some states included laws preventing colleges and universities from requiring student passwords.
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  • Bill Gates Is Once Again the Richest Man in the World

    Thanks to surging stock prices, Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates is at the top of Forbes' list of billionaires, a spot he's occupied for 15 of the last 20 years.

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  • 3 Benefits of Whole Foods' Open Salaries

    While some companies still cling to policies that bar employees from discussing their salaries, Whole Foods is one that actually allows and encourages you to peep your co-workers' salaries. Even if you don't want to disclose what you’re making (or not making) there are benefits to open salaries. Here are three.
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  • Work-Life Balance Still a Woman's Problem, According to Execs

    Men are still more apt to define themselves according to their role as "provider," according to a recent article in Harvard Business Review, while women are more likely to view themselves through the lens of personal achievement. As a result, both men and women in leadership positions seem to see family issues -- and balancing those issues with work -- as a woman's problem.

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  • How to Avoid (Unintentionally) Insulting Your Colleagues

    Passive-aggression at work is bad for everyone involved. It's not very different from yelling or bullying. But what about when you insult co-workers, with no intention of doing so? An objective examination of behavior, not intent, sheds light on how this happens, and how you can prevent being misunderstood.

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  • BLS Jobs Report: Economy Beats Expectations, Adds 175,000 Jobs in February

    Economists were predicting gains of 152,000 jobs, and unemployment falling from 6.6 percent to 6.5 percent. This morning's jobs report, on the other hand, showed 175,000 added jobs, and a slightly higher unemployment rate of 6.7 percent. Add that to an ADP report on Wednesday that was worse than expected and you have a fairly confusing picture of the economy. So what the heck is going on here?

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  • Lunchables ... for Adults?

    If you pine for the days when your lunch came in little plastic pockets, much like pills in a blister pack, rejoice: Oscar Meyer has recently announced that it will release "Portable Protein Packs" containing 170 calories worth of cheese, meat, and legumes. Aimed at adults who need a little something to tide them over on the trail or in the office, P3s resemble nothing so much as miniature Lunchables for adults. There's just one tiny problem.

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