• Women Need to Fall in Love With Computer Science ASAP

    Last month, Google revealed, for the first time ever, just how big the company’s gender gap is. Only 30 percent of Google’s overall employees are women and when looking specifically at tech-related jobs, the number drops to 17 percent. As it turns out, Google isn’t the only tech company with alarmingly low numbers of women.

  • The Most and Least Meaningful Jobs [interactive chart]

    Want a job that makes the world a better place? Sometimes, that means sacrificing practical rewards (read: cash) for a sense of helping others -- but not always. As PayScale's newest data package shows, many careers offer a salary that allows you to feed your body as well as your spirit. Some will even make you rich.

  • The Office Curmudgeon Is Better at His Job
    We have so much advice to sift through, when it comes to achieving work-life balance. One expert says to get a hobby. Another advises us to stay positive, or to cultivate friendships. While the rest of us are focusing on these things, it seems the office grump is better at his job -- even though he probably doesn't care what any of the experts say.
  • Not Sitting All Day Isn't Enough to Keep You Healthy at Work

    So you've swapped your traditional work setup for a standing desk, and now you'll never have to worry about the litany of health complaints linked to sitting at work for hours on end, right? Well, sort of.

  • Is It OK to Ask About Salary in a Job Interview?

    The conventional wisdom is that it's in a candidate's best interest to delay the salary discussion for as long as they can, both to gather information on the position and its duties and to encourage the hiring manager to throw out the first number. A recent survey from staffing services provider Robert Half, however, indicates that 31 percent of managers are comfortable with applicants asking about compensation and benefits in the very first interview. A further 38 percent say that it's OK on interview number two, and 9 percent will even accept it during the phone screen.

  • Happy Workers Love Their Mothers

    Did you know your mother follows you to work? Well, she may not actually be following you to your desk, but her influence does. A recent study found that mothers play a unique role in what kind of worker you become. It turns out that a strong relationship with your mom may cause you to be less focused on money, and more focused on finding meaning and purpose in what you do.

  • Another Benefit of a Shorter Work Day: A Better Commute
    The Swedish city of Gothenberg recently rolled out a 6.5-hour work day to some of its municipal workers, in a year-long study aimed at boosting worker productivity and job satisfaction. Over at LinkedIn, Rick Johnson argues that a shorter work day would offer another perk to stressed-out workers: less time on the road, traveling to and from work.
  • #PayChat: Money or Meaning?
    What’s your dream job? Does it pay well and also fulfill your soul? Is it possible to do what you love and make a decent living? Is a lucrative job that is also meaningful a privilege just for a select few?
  • Should Companies Allow Workers to Bring Pets Into the Office?

    If many pet owners had their way, every day -- not just last Friday -- would be Take Your Dog to Work Day. According to a recent survey, half of pet owners would like the right to bring their dog or cat to work, at least some of the time.

  • 5 Ways to Know If It's Time to Quit Your Job

    Although you don't want to quit your job at the first sign of trouble, there comes a time when enough is enough. How do you know the answer to the age old question, "Should I stay or should I go?"

  • Obama May Sign Executive Order Protecting Gay People in the Workplace
    Currently, there is no federal law protecting gays and lesbians against discrimination. Twenty-one states have enacted such protections, but in the remaining 29 states, employers may, for example, fire an employee for being gay.
  • Are You Asking These Important Questions During a Job Interview?
    This summer, college graduates across the country are getting ready for their first round of job interviews. What many people new to the workforce don't realize job interviews are not just about answering questions; they're also about asking them. However, it's all about asking the right questions, demonstrating that you're engaged in the conversation and that you've done your homework on the company and those you're speaking with.
  • More Workers Are Planning on Taking Summer Vacation, But Will They? [infographic]

    Initially, the summer of 2014 looks promising on the work-life balance front. CareerBuilder's Q2 survey showed that 63 percent of workers will take a vacation this year.

  • Is There a Downside to a $15 an Hour Minimum Wage?

    The International Franchise Association has made defeating Seattle's $15 per hour minimum wage its "top policy fight," arguing that laws like these unfairly discriminate against franchisees, who will be lumped in with big businesses and forced to comply with the law by 2017, the earliest deadline of the staged roll-out. PayScale spoke via email with Chad Mackay, President and COO of El Gaucho, a high-end steakhouse chain based in Seattle, for his take on how the law could affect both businesses and workers.

  • 3 Reasons You're Not Getting Promoted

    You know you have what it takes to do the next job up the chain, but despite your best efforts, you're still not getting promoted. Worse, maybe other, less worthy co-workers are getting ahead before you are. You talk to your manager and gracefully make your case, but all you're getting is hemming and hawing. What's really going on here?

  • 3 Tips to Successfully Work From Home

    Occupational psychologist Professor Cary Cooper has a lot to say about the benefits of working from home. He cites some laws that may protect workers, and discusses the psychology behind why remote workers are not always trusted to use their time well. Here are a few snippets of advice to people who want to succeed at working from home.

  • 3 Interviewing Lessons From the Woman Who Went on 100 Job Interviews

    Sofia Faruqi has this job interview thing down to a science, and no wonder: while working her way through school from 2007 until 2013, she interviewed 100 times at 40 different financial-services firms.

  • How to Deal With Negative People in the Workplace
    Negative people obstruct productivity in the workplace in a handful of ways. Their pessimism serves as a buzzkill when, every time you suggest an idea or improvement, they say, "No, that will never work." Complaining and gossiping at the office undermines morale, which also undermines productivity. If you can't get away from these folks, you need reasonable strategies to deal with them.
  • 5 Ways to Dress for Work in the Summer, Even When It's Hotter Than the Surface of the Sun

    Even if your company doesn't have a dress code, you know you can't get away with wearing what you'd really like to wear to work during the hot summer months. (Example: bathing suit, flip-flops, permanent look of longing for vacation.) Here's how to look professional, without feeling like you just stepped out of a sauna.

  • 4 Educational Psychology Techniques to Boost Memory and Work Performance

    Educational psychology is the study of how people learn, but the field's potential to help improve cognitive abilities isn't limited to students. Workers can use these techniques to improve memory and do better in their jobs.