• Here's Why You Get Less Done in the Summer [infographic]

    The weather outside might be gorgeous, but you couldn't prove it by most office workers in the U.S., who toil away in canned air and flickering fluorescents with nary a beach jaunt on the horizon. No wonder 25 percent of us get less done in the summer than we do the rest of the year.

  • 3 Lessons From History's First Cover Letter, Written by Leonardo da Vinci

    Cover letters have been with us for more than 500 years, since Leonardo da Vinci sent one to the Duke of Milan in 1482, enumerating his many talents. More surprising than the fact that we have Leonardo to thank for yet another invention? The realization that his letter, the first of its kind in history as far as we know, still has a lot to teach us about how to write this tricky document.

  • 6 Things Your Recruiter Expects From You, Even Before the First Contact
    The next step after applying for a job is to wait for the phone call from HR, letting you know that you've been selected for the first round of screening. The recruiter at the end of the line knows that you are interested in the job. But are you really prepared for that call?
  • 3 Reasons to Stop Rushing to Decisions

    At most companies, the best time to make a decision is yesterday. The problem, of course, is that making good choices takes time. If you're having trouble fighting a corporate culture that puts a premium on speed over quality, here are a few things to keep in mind. Some might even persuade the boss to give you the extra time you need to do things right.

  • Right Brain, Left Brain: Which Side Do Leaders Need Most?
    The left brain is analytical, the right brain is creative, or so say many psychologists. In the past, good leaders used left brain skills more. Today, however, there is more need for right brain qualities in business. Perhaps we need a "whole brain" approach.
  • The Future of Minimum Wage: More Money, But No More One-Size-Fits-All

    At the beginning of the month, Seattle's city council voted unanimously to increase the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour in stages over the next three to seven years. To get a business owner's perspective on the issue, we spoke via email with John Pepper, co-founder and former CEO of Boloco, a Boston-based restaurant chain with 22 units across New England. Pepper told us a bit about why a higher minimum wage isn't necessarily bad for business and what else needs to change for small businesses to thrive while paying their workers higher wages.

  • College Enrollment Is Dropping and That's Not a Bad Thing

    According to a recent report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, some older students are actually leaving school to return to an improving job market. Since last year, enrollment dropped by 0.8 percent; over the previous year, enrollment declined 2.3 percent.

  • Are You a 'Bedtime Procrastinator'?

    If you have trouble getting through the afternoon without an extra cup of coffee or two, you're either the parent of a small child, an insomniac, or someone who just can't bring himself to go to bed when it's time. All three conditions will wreak havoc on your productivity, but since the last one is under your control, it's the most worth examining, in terms of improving efficiency and job satisfaction. Why do we stay up, when we should go to bed?

  • The 13 Best Jobs for Cat People

    If there is one thing some people will never agree upon, it is which pet is superior: dogs or cats. These strong opinions are the result of innate personality differences in cat lovers vs. dog lovers. And, of course, our personalities inform our best career choices.

  • The 9 Best Jobs for Dog People
    The dog person vs. cat person war is all in fun, but your choice of pet may say more about your personality than which pictures you upload to the internet. It might even give you (some) insight into which jobs you will enjoy and perform best.
  • Obama Signs an Executive Order Extending Student Loan Debt Cap

    Yesterday, President Barack Obama sat down with Tumblr founder David Karp to do a live Q&A on the service, answering questions about student loans and his recent executive order expanding the Pay-as-You-Earn program.

  • College Choice: Substance Trumps Style for a Happy Life

    Feeling pressured to gain acceptance to an elite college? Don’t. According to a new Gallup-Purdue University study, it’s not where you study that matters in life, but what happens while you’re there. Researchers surveyed 30,000 college graduates and found that a person’s overall well-being and engagement in their work after college has little to do with where they went to school, but rather is influenced by the formative experiences they had while they were there.

  • More Job Openings, But Not Necessarily More Hires

    On the last day of April, there were 4.5 million job openings, according to today's release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That's 0.3 million job openings more than in March. Hires, on the other hand, were practically flat at 4.7 million. What's going on here?

  • 3 Tips for Better Business Cards

    In the age of LinkedIn and online job application forms, you're likely to forget about a valuable in-person networking tool: the business card. If you haven't bothered to update your card in a while -- or have a one so unmemorable, you have piles of left-behind cards stacked around your desk -- there are a few things you can do to step up your business card game.

  • How to Enter a Room Like You Own the Place

    If you have a big job interview or presentation coming up, you've probably already thought a lot about how to make a good first impression. You know you need to dress professionally, for example, and make eye contact. Perhaps you've even thought about things like the strength of your handshake or the genuineness of your facial expressions. But you probably never thought about one key ingredient for winning over your audience: the way you enter a room.

  • Your Job Is Killing You (Here's How to Change That)

    Working in an office seems like one of the safer career choices you can make. Unlike medical professionals, you don't have to worry about your mistakes costing lives; unlike, say, firefighters or military personnel, you don't have to be concerned about danger to your own life or limb. Or do you?

  • 5 Tips to Handle Manipulative Bosses
    It's easier if you can just avoid dealing with manipulative people, but when the person in question is your boss, that's not really possible. If you don't recognize his pathology and learn to appropriately assert your own boundaries, you'll lose yourself while attempting to please him. These five tips will help you maintain your sanity and survive your difficult boss.
  • The Ugly Truth About Meetings [infographic]

    If you feel like you spend half your working hours sitting in a meeting, you're not alone. According to research compiled by Fuze, an online meetings service provider, there are 25 million meetings every day in the US. It's probably safe to say that they're not all fueling creativity and driving business results.

  • Is the Organization’s Culture the Right Fit for You?
    Before accepting a job offer, we often spend a lot of time learning about the organization's structure, compensation and benefits plan, job responsibilities, and so on. But a very important -- yet often overlooked -- aspect of working for a company is the organizational culture. Would you be able to thrive in its environment and work culture? What do you even know about it?
  • 3 Leadership Myths Debunked
    Are some people born leaders, and the rest of us are fated to simply follow them in awe of their natural skills? Or is leadership something we all can achieve? Dr. Ronald E. Riggio, an expert in organizational psychology, discusses the truth and the myth of leadership in Psychology Today.