• Should Companies Allow Workers to Bring Pets Into the Office?

    If many pet owners had their way, every day -- not just last Friday -- would be Take Your Dog to Work Day. According to a recent survey, half of pet owners would like the right to bring their dog or cat to work, at least some of the time.

  • 5 Ways to Know If It's Time to Quit Your Job

    Although you don't want to quit your job at the first sign of trouble, there comes a time when enough is enough. How do you know the answer to the age old question, "Should I stay or should I go?"

  • Obama May Sign Executive Order Protecting Gay People in the Workplace
    Currently, there is no federal law protecting gays and lesbians against discrimination. Twenty-one states have enacted such protections, but in the remaining 29 states, employers may, for example, fire an employee for being gay.
  • Are You Asking These Important Questions During a Job Interview?
    This summer, college graduates across the country are getting ready for their first round of job interviews. What many people new to the workforce don't realize job interviews are not just about answering questions; they're also about asking them. However, it's all about asking the right questions, demonstrating that you're engaged in the conversation and that you've done your homework on the company and those you're speaking with.
  • More Workers Are Planning on Taking Summer Vacation, But Will They? [infographic]

    Initially, the summer of 2014 looks promising on the work-life balance front. CareerBuilder's Q2 survey showed that 63 percent of workers will take a vacation this year.

  • Is There a Downside to a $15 an Hour Minimum Wage?

    The International Franchise Association has made defeating Seattle's $15 per hour minimum wage its "top policy fight," arguing that laws like these unfairly discriminate against franchisees, who will be lumped in with big businesses and forced to comply with the law by 2017, the earliest deadline of the staged roll-out. PayScale spoke via email with Chad Mackay, President and COO of El Gaucho, a high-end steakhouse chain based in Seattle, for his take on how the law could affect both businesses and workers.

  • 3 Reasons You're Not Getting Promoted

    You know you have what it takes to do the next job up the chain, but despite your best efforts, you're still not getting promoted. Worse, maybe other, less worthy co-workers are getting ahead before you are. You talk to your manager and gracefully make your case, but all you're getting is hemming and hawing. What's really going on here?

  • 3 Tips to Successfully Work From Home

    Occupational psychologist Professor Cary Cooper has a lot to say about the benefits of working from home. He cites some laws that may protect workers, and discusses the psychology behind why remote workers are not always trusted to use their time well. Here are a few snippets of advice to people who want to succeed at working from home.

  • 3 Interviewing Lessons From the Woman Who Went on 100 Job Interviews

    Sofia Faruqi has this job interview thing down to a science, and no wonder: while working her way through school from 2007 until 2013, she interviewed 100 times at 40 different financial-services firms.

  • How to Deal With Negative People in the Workplace
    Negative people obstruct productivity in the workplace in a handful of ways. Their pessimism serves as a buzzkill when, every time you suggest an idea or improvement, they say, "No, that will never work." Complaining and gossiping at the office undermines morale, which also undermines productivity. If you can't get away from these folks, you need reasonable strategies to deal with them.
  • 5 Ways to Dress for Work in the Summer, Even When It's Hotter Than the Surface of the Sun

    Even if your company doesn't have a dress code, you know you can't get away with wearing what you'd really like to wear to work during the hot summer months. (Example: bathing suit, flip-flops, permanent look of longing for vacation.) Here's how to look professional, without feeling like you just stepped out of a sauna.

  • 4 Educational Psychology Techniques to Boost Memory and Work Performance

    Educational psychology is the study of how people learn, but the field's potential to help improve cognitive abilities isn't limited to students. Workers can use these techniques to improve memory and do better in their jobs.

  • Starbucks Offers Free Online College Classes to Employees

    Want to get that bachelor's degree you’ve always wanted, but couldn’t afford? Become a barista. The Starbucks Corporation announced Monday that it's going to finance online degrees for employees via Arizona State University. The Starbucks College Achievement Plan, the first of its kind, will be available to U.S. Starbucks employees working at least 20 hours a week.

  • Having Trouble Finding a Job? This Site Can Help
    In May 2013, the unemployment rate was at 6.3 percent in the U.S. -- and that's not counting everyone who is underemployed or still employed, yet looking for their next job. A new website, 50waystogetajob.com, has emerged to help job seekers discover unique solutions that can help them get a job, other than emailing dozens of copies of their resumes every day.
  • How Sports Psychology Helps Workers
    Sports psychologists -- psychologists trained specifically to help athletes perform their best -- have become in demand in recent years, according to the British Psychological Society. But even if you're not an elite athlete, sports psychology can help you perform better at your job.
  • 5 Easy Ways to Be More Productive, Even on Monday Morning

    Having trouble getting out of your own way this morning? Even if you love your job, Monday mornings are rough. If you're not engaged with your work -- and 87 percent of workers aren't -- it's even harder to get into the swing. Here are five little small changes you can make, to make it easier to get back to work after a weekend.

  • Here's Why You Get Less Done in the Summer [infographic]

    The weather outside might be gorgeous, but you couldn't prove it by most office workers in the U.S., who toil away in canned air and flickering fluorescents with nary a beach jaunt on the horizon. No wonder 25 percent of us get less done in the summer than we do the rest of the year.

  • 3 Lessons From History's First Cover Letter, Written by Leonardo da Vinci

    Cover letters have been with us for more than 500 years, since Leonardo da Vinci sent one to the Duke of Milan in 1482, enumerating his many talents. More surprising than the fact that we have Leonardo to thank for yet another invention? The realization that his letter, the first of its kind in history as far as we know, still has a lot to teach us about how to write this tricky document.

  • 6 Things Your Recruiter Expects From You, Even Before the First Contact
    The next step after applying for a job is to wait for the phone call from HR, letting you know that you've been selected for the first round of screening. The recruiter at the end of the line knows that you are interested in the job. But are you really prepared for that call?
  • 3 Reasons to Stop Rushing to Decisions

    At most companies, the best time to make a decision is yesterday. The problem, of course, is that making good choices takes time. If you're having trouble fighting a corporate culture that puts a premium on speed over quality, here are a few things to keep in mind. Some might even persuade the boss to give you the extra time you need to do things right.