• Your Mid-30s Is a Great Time to Change Careers
    There is nothing wrong with changing careers at any point in your life -- in fact, there is a lot to be said for it. After years of doing the same thing, the challenge and the excitement can wear off, and it can start to feel as if you're ready for something new. Statistics show that most people will make a career change five to seven times over the course of their life. Not all of these changes are major, but whether you're considering changing your whole career, or just shifting from one job to another within the same career category, your mid-30s are a great time to shake things up.
  • Today's 4 Least Stressful Jobs
    Some jobs are more stressful than others. A recent study from CareerCast analyzed careers according to 11 specific demands placed on workers that are known to cause stress. The list evaluated factors like like travel time, competitiveness, and deadlines.
  • Smartphones in the Workplace: Productivity Tool or Time Suck?
    Forty-five percent of American adults owned a smartphone as of 2013, according to EdTech Magazine. Used well, these devices can make your personal and professional life easier -- provided you have good boundaries and can disconnect when you need to.
  • Man Gets Fired for Not Coming to Work for 24 Years
    Do you ever feel like nobody at work is paying attention to what you do, to the extent that you could stop showing up for work, and maybe no one would notice? A. K. Verma, a civil servant in India, did not show up for work for 24 years. Then, he got fired.
  • 5 Hard and Soft Skills That Will Get You Hired
    When it comes to job searching, the internet giveth and the internet taketh away. It's easy to find job listings, but arguably tougher than ever to stand out from the crowd of qualified applicants. However, if you have the right skills -- and know how to draw attention to them on your resume -- your chances of being noticed by a recruiter are pretty darn good.
  • Obama Pushes Paid Leave for Americans
    Yesterday, President Obama signed a memorandum directing federal agencies to give employees up to six weeks of paid leave after the birth or adoption of a child -- that's a "benefit he wants to extend to all American workers" with the Healthy Families Act, according to The New York Times. It's also long overdue. While the Family and Medical Leave Act provides for 12 weeks of unpaid leave, that magical "paid leave" is discretionary.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Don't Stalk the HR Manager
    Sometimes, the job interview process feels like the worst parts of dating. So much depends on having good instincts and good luck, and no matter how clever you are, you're always going to be plagued with at least a little self-doubt. This week's roundup kicks off with advice that will help job seekers avoid overdoing the follow-up after an interview. (Plus: tips on goal setting after your New Year's resolutions fail and more insight into why the gulf between older and younger workers sometimes seems so huge.)
  • 9 Job Fair Tips to Get You Hired
    Job fairs don't end in offers, but they do help candidates get a foot in the door of their targeted organization. Depending on your experience level, a job fair maybe a good place to meet prospective employers, connect with HR personnel, and expand your network.
  • Today's 4 Most Stressful Jobs
    There is a lot to consider when choosing a profession. Stress is not the only factor that comes into play when making that decision. In fact, many of the most stressful jobs identified through a recent study from CareerCast are especially rewarding, stimulating, and important careers. But, they certainly are stressful.
  • The Rise of the 'Uni-Moon' and the Decline of Work-Life Balance
    When married couples cannot even take their honeymoon together because they are unable to coordinate time off from work, something needs to change. This rather disturbing new trend is called a "uni-moon," and it is not helpful to work-life balance.
  • #FairPayMatters: What the World Needs to Learn From the Sony vs Charlize Theron Fiasco
    If anything good came out of the Sony email hack, it's that Charlize Theron put Sony on blast for paying her $10 million less than her male co-star, Chris Hemsworth, for their upcoming film, The Huntsman. Let’s take a look at how Theron’s ballsy move (pun very much intended) is encouraging women to quit the coy act and fight for their right to earn equal pay in their careers.
  • The Minimum Wage Increased in 20 States This Month
    In 20 states and the District of Columbia, the New Year meant higher wages for the lowest-paid workers. For states like Arkansas, Hawaii, Maryland, Nebraska, South Dakota, and West Virginia, the hike means that minimum-wage employees will make more than the federally mandated minimum of $7.25 an hour for the first time ever.
  • Even Great Employees Can Be Fired for a Single Mistake
    We like to think that employers take an employee's whole record into account when making a decision as to whether the employee should lose his or her job. But sometimes just one mistake can be enough to end an employment relationship, which can be absolutely devastating for the employee.
  • 3 Women Making a Big Difference in Tech for Future Generations
    Studies show that women in tech are vastly underrepresented, but that's not stopping these three tech-savvy ladies from making a huge difference for future generations of techies. See how these women are using their know-how to pave a new path for a brighter and more balanced future in technology.
  • Negotiating Salary? Don't Forget About Benefits
    Ask anyone who's ever paid out-of-pocket for their health insurance: benefits are important. It's too bad, then, that we often overlook benefits when we're negotiating salary. PayScale's recently published Salary Negotiation Guide examines all the factors that go into making up a compensation package that reflects your skills and experience, not just base pay. Keep these in the back of your mind the next time you're negotiating an offer, and you could wind up earning more, saving money, and enjoying better work-life balance.
  • 8 Tips to Prepare for a Panel Interview
    The recruiter sounds very excited on the phone: "I've scheduled you for a panel interview with our managers next Tuesday a.m. I look forward to meeting with you. Do you have any questions for me?" You hear "panel interview" and you freeze. Handling one interviewer at a time is a task, so a panel interview is not exactly the best news. But hold on, before you sweat the phone out of your hand. Understand a bit more about panel interviews to know how to ace them.
  • It's Not Just About STEM: The Case for a Well-Rounded Education
    With the high cost of post-secondary education, you could be forgiven for wondering whether it's worth it to take classes unrelated to job training. Specifically, many students feel pressure to concentrate on STEM degrees, which yield the highest dollar-for-dollar return on investment. While the desire to be employable is good, foregoing a well-rounded education is short-sighted. Even if you're fortunate enough to love science and math, here's why you should leave the engineering department once in a while, in order to maximize your college experience.
  • Will You Change Careers in 2015?
    You know the saying: "A new year. A new you." Why not apply that to your career, too? If you're looking for a career change in the new year, then you might want to check out the top occupations the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects as the most promising, broken down by highest paying, fastest growing, and most new availabilities.
  • This Is What's Stopping You From Getting the Salary You Deserve
    More than half of respondents to PayScale's salary survey have never negotiated their salary, according to data gathered for our recent Salary Negotiation Guide, despite the fact that 75 percent of those who asked received a bump in pay, and 44 percent even got the entire sum they requested. Furthermore, research suggests that many of the non-negotiators consider themselves to be underpaid. So why don't people ask more often?
  • 5 At-Home Business Ideas for Stay-at-Home Parents
    Childcare is expensive, but so is opting out of your career to be a stay-at-home parent. If you want to leave the rat race, but keep investing in your professional development (and 401k), starting your own at-home business might be the answer. Becoming your own boss doesn't have to be scary -- actually, it can be enjoyable and empowering at the same time.