• ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 200,000 Jobs in March
    Prior to this morning's release of the monthly ADP National Employment Report, economists polled by Reuters were predicting the addition of 194,000 jobs to private payrolls in March. The actual tally, 200,000 jobs, just exceeded their expectations.
  • People Are Living in Indoor Boxes Now in San Francisco, Because the Rent Is Too High
    OK, fine, it's just one person, but isn't that still too many? Freelance illustrator Peter Berkowitz currently lives in an 8-foot-long, 4.5-foot-high wooden box in his friends' living room. He tells The Washington Post that his decision to construct and move into the box wasn't "fueled by poverty," but rather the desire to achieve "some kind of middle ground between having a bedroom and sleeping on a couch."
  • How to Keep Your Lazy Co-Worker From Ruining Your Career
    If you listen to NPR's Morning Edition on your way to work, you probably heard their recent segment, Before You Judge Lazy Workers, Consider They Might Serve a Purpose, which used agricultural studies involving ants and surprising advice from productivity experts to make the case that lazy individuals aren't always bad for the group. If you are not a lazy individual, but a member of the team that has to deal with them, however, you might have started your day with a white-knuckled rage grip on the steering wheel, screaming at your windshield as other commuters tried to pretend they were absorbed by the flow of traffic. Laziness, good? Tell that to the folks who have to pick up the slack. Why should Ferris get to ditch when everybody else has to go?
  • How Your New Salary Negotiation Hero Scored a $30,000 Raise
    In the post-recession economy, most people would count themselves lucky to get a 3 percent annual raise, or make a jump to a new job that gives them a couple of extra thousand dollars a year – even if that bump seems to disappear, once taxes come out. But not Claudia Telles. The 28-year-old quality specialist tells Business Insider that she managed to jump from a $41,000 annual salary to $72,000 – all without leaving her employer.
  • California Is About to Raise the Minimum Wage to $15 Per Hour
    Gov. Jerry Brown announced Monday that California has reached a "landmark deal" to increase the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2022, after lawmakers made a tentative agreement over the weekend. If approved by the state assembly, the deal will make California the first state in the nation to adopt a $15 minimum wage for all workers.
  • What Buffer's Gender Pay Gap Can Tell Us About Unconscious Bias
    Pay transparency is supposed to help companies close the gender pay gap. By being open about their compensation philosophy, sometimes to the point of posting employee salaries for everyone to see, decision-makers hope to catch pay inequities before they become entrenched. Buffer, the social media management tool provider, is one of the companies that's most publicly committed to transparency, publishing not only their salary formula, but a public spreadsheet of every salary at the company, from the CEO on down – which is why the company was taken aback to discover that female employees make less than males.
  • #MondayMotivation: Learn How to Procrastinate From 3 Famous Writers
    If you're a committed procrastinator, you're probably also pretty good at making excuses. Missed trains, minor domestic crises, even the tried-and-true "the dog ate my homework" routine – they're all pretty good for a delay, provided you don't use them too often. After a while, people will wonder why the train works for them, but not for you ... and how much it would cost to send your dog to obedience school on your behalf. Eventually, you're going to need some new stories to tell the boss.
  • 5 Ways to Spring-Clean Your Career
    Many cultures have a tradition of cleaning house in the spring. That just makes sense: spring is a time of visible new beginnings, in the form of budding flowers and longer days, and for a lot of us, it's the first time in months we've had the energy to contemplate doing more than the bare minimum. If you've been feeling stuck in your career, spring is also the perfect time to dust off your resume and start honing your skills. You could be in a totally different place, professionally, by the time winter rolls round again.
  • Economist on Revised Jobless Claims: Numbers Suggest 'Not Much Slack Remains in the Labor Market'

    This week's jobless claims were lower than expected, but that's not the biggest economic news this week. That honor goes to the revised claims for the first week of March, reports Business Insider.

    "Most of the changes were relatively modest, but the most notable aspect of the revisions is that claims for the week of March 5th (3 weeks ago) were revised down to 253,000 which is, as far as we can tell, the lowest weekly claims figure since November 24, 1973," writes Thomas Simons, senior economist at Jefferies. Simons called this "a remarkable statistic and it continues to suggest that not that much slack remains in the labor market."

  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How to Be a Superhero Manager
    "I have to go to work tomorrow," a friend of mine recently informed me. "And the worst part is, I'm still not Batman." For most of us, work is a far cry from superheroics, unless you count being able to endure an interminable meeting without sighing a feat of strength. (And sometimes, it is.) But as the lead story in this week's roundup shows us, being good at managing is a superpower – but one you can develop over time, with no origin story required. Read all about that, plus the assumptions you should stop making about LinkedIn, and the ways in which your brand will change over time, in this week's post.
  • Amazon Reveals Pay Data After All, Shows Virtually No Gender Pay Gap
    Earlier this week, the Securities and Exchange Commission rejected Amazon's request to keep their pay data private, after Arjuna Capital filed a shareholder resolution to request that data. Yesterday, Amazon announced that it will share pay data – and that women at the company currently make 99.9 cents for every dollar male employees earn. Amazon also revealed that minority employees make 100.1 cents for every dollar earned by white employees.
  • Are Millennials Changing the Culture of Work?

    What the boss says, goes. Don't put anything online that you wouldn't print out and hang over your desk. Don't expect a free lunch, or a fast promotion, and always remember: your mama doesn't work here.

    Those are the old rules of corporate culture, and most of us – especially if we were born before ubiquitous internet – agree that they're still the smart way to go. After all, what is etiquette, but a way to keep from driving our neighbors crazy, whether those neighbors live across a driveway or on the other side of a cubicle wall?

  • 5 Ways to Avoid Answering the Worst Job Interview Question, 'What's Your Salary History?'
    First things first: anyone who tells you that you can always dodge the salary history question is probably trying to sell you something. The reality of the situation is that sometimes, you just can't wriggle out of answering this question – not if you want to stay a viable candidate for the job. But, that doesn't mean that you should name your price right away. You might be able to get the hiring manager to focus on the future, not the past, and that's what you're hoping for.
  • Everything You Know About Being Successful Is Wrong

    "Research shows that the kind of happiness that does lead to long-lasting fulfillment is the kind of happiness that's derived from positive social relationships with other people," says Dr. Emma Seppälä, the Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. "A life of meaning, a life of purpose, a life characterized by altruism, something greater than oneself."

    A life, in other words, that can feel pretty difficult to create in today's corporate culture, which prizes achievement and productivity. But maybe there's another way to live and work. Seppälä's new book, The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success, examines research on happiness, and makes the case that finding fulfillment builds success, not the other way around.

  • When an Occupation Becomes Female-Dominated, Pay Declines
    During any debate about the gender pay gap, one argument will eventually emerge: women make less than men because they choose lower-paying jobs. But what if it turns out that women aren't so much choosing low-paying jobs as working at jobs that are low-paid precisely because there are more women in those occupations? If that sounds far-fetched, one study, recently discussed at The Upshot in The New York Times, might change your mind. Researchers analyzed 50 years of U.S. Census data and found that pay drops when professions move from predominantly male to female – in short, if women do a job, it's likely to be low-paid, for no other reason than that women's work is undervalued.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do You Feel Trapped in Your Career?
    The average person changes jobs 10 to 15 times over the course of their career, and spends less than five years at each job. Harder to figure out: how many times they change careers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't track it, and many changes are pretty subtle anyway, as career paths naturally evolve over time. Sometimes, however, you have to make a leap. In this week's roundup, we look at what to do when you need to make a big career change, plus resume rules you should stop breaking, and ways to beat burnout.
  • How to Enjoy March Madness Without Driving Your Co-Workers Crazy
    March Madness is upon us – whether that's good or bad depends on your feelings about college basketball, your workplace's culture around sports, and your need to get stuff done between now and April 4. Ideally, you and your co-workers would all be able to enjoy the bonding potential of debating the merits of your favorite teams, without turning the office into a locker room or annoying your colleagues who would choose unpaid overtime over courtside seats.
  • 7 Ways to Change Your Career Luck, Starting Today
    When it comes to your career, there's a lot that's outside your control. You can't make a job opening appear when you really need one, or keep an awesome boss from transferring to another department, or boost the budget for raises and the opportunities for promotion. At the end of the day, pretty much all you can control is yourself and your behavior. The good news is that sometimes, that's enough.
  • Good News: Today Is Everything You Do Is Right Day
    In the pantheon of Awesome Fake Holidays, today – Everything You Do Is Right Day, according to important internet sources – is right up there with Talk Like a Pirate Day in terms of boosting your self-esteem and tickling your spirit. Just for today, it's OK to believe that everything you do will turn out right. (It's also OK to talk like a pirate, but you'll have to wait until September to do it without getting stared at.)
  • Your Boss Should Let You Nap at Work, and Here's Why
    If you're scanning Twitter for the #NationalNappingDay hashtag and scowling enviously at anyone whose employer offers a space-age nap pod or even just a dedicated room for the occasional snooze, take heart. While we can't promise you that your boss will care, the good news is that science is on your side when it comes to the benefits of napping.

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