ADVERTISEMENT
  • Let Donald Trump Teach You What Not to Do at Work
    Donald Trump is running for president, and much like your drunkest uncle at a holiday dinner, he's getting the festivities off to a start by insulting absolutely every person on the planet, one box on the census form at a time. His candidacy might inspire guffaws, but it's no joke: as of last week, he was No. 2 in the polls, behind only Jeb Bush, in the race for the Republican nomination. Of course, there are no silver medals in politics, and second in 2015 isn't first in 2016. Still, even if he never wins the nomination, he still has a lot to teach you about your career. Think of it as modeling by negative example.
  • 3 Career Lessons From the US Women's World Cup Victory
    What does a soccer game have to do with your career? If the soccer game in question is last night's World Cup clincher and you're a working woman, a lot. Most of us probably won't experience what it's like to be a world-class athlete fighting for dominance on a global playing field, but even if you're not a sports fan of any stripe, you can learn a lot from the US women's national soccer team.
  • Declare Your Independence From Your Employer (But Not the Way You Think)
    First things first: do not quit your job, without having another one lined up. No matter how lousy your current gig feels, being unemployed is almost certainly worse. However, if you really hate your job, and you're trying not to think about the horror show waiting for you back at the office on the other side of this lovely holiday weekend, we have a few tips to make things better today – no new gig required.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Do I Get Paid Extra for Working on the Holiday?
    If you're headed into work this weekend instead of hanging around a barbecue, waiting for the fireworks to start, you're probably already a little annoyed. If you're not getting paid extra for it, you might even upgrade annoyed to downright mad. In this week's roundup, we look at expert advice on determining whether you're likely to get paid more for working holidays – plus, insight on goal-setting and how to redeem a job interview, once it starts going horribly wrong.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 223,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment at 5.3 Percent
    Job growth slowed slightly last month, and the labor force shrank by 432,000 workers, offsetting similarly sized gains in May, according to this morning's Employment Situation Summary. In addition, the Bureau of Labor Statistics revised April and May's reports downward by 60,000 jobs.
  • 'The Best Leap I Ever Took': 10 Career Risks That Paid Off
    Due diligence is important, whether you're taking a new job, making a career change, or starting a business. Sometimes, however, you have to jump and hope for the best. (Hopefully, you know, after some careful planning and building up a cushion of savings to soften your landing.) We asked Facebook users to tell us about the biggest risk they ever took ... and how it made their careers.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 237,000 Jobs in June
    Private payrolls added 237,000 jobs last month, according to The ADP National Employment Report, the most in six months.
  • Obama Will Expand Overtime to 40 Percent of Salaried American Workers
    Yesterday, President Obama announced a rule change that will expand time-and-half eligibility to around 5 million Americans. By raising the overtime threshold from $23,660 a year to $50,440, the president will grant overtime to workers who were previously ineligible for overtime pay, despite earning low wages and working more than 40 hours a week.
  • How the Supreme Court Ruling on Same-Sex Marriage Could Affect Employee Benefits
    On Friday, the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, effectively legalizing gay marriage in the 13 states in which it wasn't permitted by law. In his majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy said, "Rising from the most basic human needs, marriage is essential to our most profound hopes and aspirations." Some of those more practical needs are about to be at the forefront of your employer's HR policies in the coming months. Here's what you can expect to see, in terms of changes to your employee benefits.
  • Women Apologize Too Much. Here's How to Stop.
    When you're a kid, the message about apologies is clear: when you're wrong – or even if you hurt someone by mistake – say you're sorry. The problem is, as kids grow into adults, one half of the human race seems to retain the message ... while the other half reserves their apologies for special occasions. (You know which is which.) Why, exactly, do women feel that they must apologize all the time, and how can they curb the impulse, especially at work?
  • Americans Are Working at Home More Than They Used To
    Last year, on days when they worked, 23 percent of employed Americans worked at least part of the day at home, according to the American Time Use Survey, which was released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics earlier this week. That's up from 2003, the first year in which figures were recorded, when 19 percent of employed U.S. workers spent at least part of their working days doing their jobs from home.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: The Real Way to Become a Better Listener
    If you've ever tried to up your listening game, you know it's harder than it seems. It's not a matter of simply cultivating interest in what the speaker is saying, or suppressing the tendency to wait for your chance to talk. This week's roundup includes insight into why you can't become a better listener, just by listening harder – plus, how to improve, the right way, and an explanation of why all those productivity hacks aren't helping you to get more done.
  • If Robots Take Our Jobs, Do People Still Need to Work?
    Robots are coming for (some of) our jobs. The question is, how many of our jobs can we expect to lose to automation, how soon will it happen – and most importantly, what will happen to us, the humble humans who are used to trading labor for cash, and cash for the things we need to survive?
  • By 2025, ROI for Public Colleges Will Outpace Private By 24 Percent
    Seven out of 10 college seniors graduate with student loan debt, so determining the ROI on their degree is more important than ever before. For this reason, the most important decision students make might be one they don't consciously consider: whether to attend a public or private college.
  • Career Advice From 4 Famous Dads
    If you're close to your dad – or another beloved father figure – you've probably got big plans today to show him how important he is to you. Of course, if you really want to make his heart soar, the best thing you can do is listen to him. It might even be in your best interests: while dads tend to be on their kids' side, and thus far from neutral, their perspective is pretty valuable and could give your career the boost it's been lacking.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: A Background Check ... Before the Interview?
    For the most part, today's workers are used to the idea that they'll have to jump through some hoops to get a job, up to and including a background check. Generally speaking, however, the privacy-invasion part of the job search process happens once the offer is on the table. What would you do if a prospective employer insisted on digging into your background ... before you even had a job interview? That question, plus "Tinder for job seekers," and the little resume mistakes that really matter, in this week's roundup.
  • Your Boss Wants You to Be Happy at Work (and That's Bad News)
    The sound you hear is your boss tossing his computer out the window after reading that headline. After all, isn't working for people who care about their employees' feelings a good thing? Before you accuse anyone of being an ingrate, rest assured: individual bosses who care are still a positive. However, as the recently published book The Happiness Industry suggests, the science of "happiness at work" has a dark side, and less to do with your emotional health than your ability to produce, produce, produce.
  • Queen Bee Syndrome Is Not a Thing
    Women, amirite? When they're not weeping or scheming, they're tearing each other down at work. Or, at least, that's how the theory goes. It's called Queen Bee Syndrome, and it's occupied a place in workplace lore for as long as women have been represented in the labor force. There's just one problem. A recent study shows that it's probably not true.
  • Oregon to Employers: No, You Can't Make Workers Have a Facebook Account
    Technology moves faster than law. As a result, the era of social media has been a tricky one for workers' rights. Various state and federal courts have settled questions about whether employers can ask their employees for access to their accounts and whether complaining about work on social networks counts as collective bargaining. The latest frontier in social media-related employment law: mandating that workers maintain social media accounts in the first place.
  • Career Success Guide: How to Stay Employed (Even When You're Unemployed)
    Whether you're just starting your career, or have been working for years, one thing is certain: it's harder to find a job when you don't have one. That's helpful to know if you're considering quitting a job without having another one lined up, but if you're a recent grad, newly laid-off, or just plain between gigs, well, there's not much you can do, right? Not so fast.