• ADP Jobs Report: Economy Added 230,000 Jobs in October
    The private sector added 230,000 jobs last month, according to the ADP National Employment Report, exceeding analysts' estimates of 220,000 jobs added.
  • Do Not Call In Sick Using These 7 Ridiculous Excuses
    It's hard to get time off. Over the past 20 years, access to paid vacation days has declined, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, while more employers are offering sick time and other personal leave. This means that the temptation to take the occasional "mental health" day is stronger than ever before. Just remember, before you do, that lying has a way of coming back to haunt you in the end.
  • How to Avoid the Office Food Pusher
    Getting along with co-workers people can be hard, especially during the holiday season, which offers a particular challenge: how to avoid eating everyone's leftover candy, home-baked treats, and edible gifts, without alienating team members.
  • 5 Last-Minute Halloween Costumes You Can Make From Stuff Around the Office
    Hey, did you forget something? No, it's not your anniversary, and it's not your boss's birthday. (Probably.) It is, however, Halloween, and if you don't have a costume yet, the good news is that you don't need to panic. You can make an excellent Halloween costume without even leaving your office building, just by using the stuff you've already got on hand.
  • 3 Things That Got Better for LGBT Workers Since Tim Cook Joined Apple in 1998
    Today, in an op-ed in BloombergBusinessweek, Apple CEO Tim Cook officially came out: "While I have never denied my sexuality, I haven't publicly acknowledged it either, until now. So let me be clear: I'm proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me."
  • How College Rankings Work [infographic]
    Every year, media outlets run their lists of the top colleges and universities in the country, and every year, prospective students read them and scratch their heads, wondering why this list says that Princeton is the nation's top university, while that list says it's Stanford, and so on. The answer is that every list-maker has its own set of criteria for determining the best institutions. To find the best school for you, start by learning what goes into these rankings.
  • 3 Reasons You Didn't Get the Job
    Every job interview, even a bad one, is an opportunity to learn something about how to pitch yourself to companies, and figure out what a given job entails and what the corporate culture has to offer. The problem, of course, is that hiring managers don't always tell you why the company opted to pass, which makes it harder to learn from your mistakes. Here's what might be holding you back, and how to tweak your approach to improve your chances in the future.
  • 5 Ways to End Your Workweek on a High Note
    What do you do at work on Friday afternoons? Mobile devices and online access to the tools we use to do our jobs have made it harder to hide out under our desks and wait for the factory whistle to blow. Still, after a long, hard week, it's easy to let burnout overwhelm you. Don't just coast through the last minutes and hours of your workweek. Use your time wisely, and you'll have a more pleasant weekend, and start next week off fresh and ready to work.
  • Advanced Degrees Are No Guarantee, But Most of the Highest Earners Have One
    Much has been written -- here, and elsewhere -- about the fact that graduate degrees are no guarantee of success. However, PayScale's College Salary Report shows that the highest earners tend to have advanced degrees. Furthermore, the wage earners who see the largest increase in their salaries over the course of their careers are generally those who continue their education beyond a two- or four-year degree.
  • Top 10 Law Schools by Salary Potential

    A law degree isn't the guarantee of success that it used to be, but if you choose the right law school, you stand a much better chance of earning a high salary, both after graduation and over the long term. That doesn't mean that you need to set your sights on the Ivy League, however. This year's College Salary Report includes plenty of programs from non-Ivy schools.

  • Top 10 Graduate Schools by Salary Potential
    If you're thinking of going back to school to get a graduate degree, whether it's a Master's, a PhD, a JD, or an MBA, know this: where you decide to get your advanced degree is important, both when it comes to getting a job after graduation and in terms of how much money you'll make over the course of your career. This release of the College Salary Report concentrates on top graduate schools.
  • Here Is the Most Popular Job in Your Income Bracket
    Every passing year brings us to greater heights of creativity when it comes to job titles, but for every chief chatter and beverage dissemination officer, you'll still meet many more managers, nursing aides, and lawyers.
  • In Praise of the Office Eeyore
    Given their druthers, many would prefer to work with a moderately cheerful colleague, instead of someone who tends to see the dark side of a situation, but maybe they should reconsider. Studies suggest that our gloomier colleagues might have a valuable perspective to offer -- one that relentlessly positive types might not be able to duplicate.
  • Work Fewer Hours, Be More Productive
    Call it corporate hazing: many companies reward workers, either monetarily or with social capital, for working round the clock, both at the office and after hours. Think about the last time you heard someone at your business described as a "good worker" or a "team player." Implicit in the descriptor? "This is a worker who is never off duty." There's just one problem, of course. Studies suggest that working more hours might actually make workers less productive, not more.
  • Why the Container Store Can Afford to Pay Employees the Big Bucks
    The average retail clerk makes a median salary of $28,000 a year across the United States. Employees at the Container Store, however, make an average of $50,000 a year -- nearly twice that. Why would a store pay more than the market rate? It all comes down to CEO Kip Tindell's "one great person equals three good people" rule.
  • What Really Makes Us Love Our Jobs
    If your boss has seemed more than usually solicitous of your happiness on the job over the past few months, you might have Gallup to thank (or blame, depending on your point of view). The organization released research late last year that showed that only 29 percent of US employees were engaged at work. As a result, some organizations panicked, worrying that disengaged workers wouldn't produce, and began to focus on making employees happy. There's just one problem: according to Gallup's CEO, focusing on making workers happy doesn't improve productivity or make them enjoy their jobs more.
  • 3 Ways to Get Along With Your Least Favorite Co-Workers
    Don't burn your bridges, the advice goes. There's just one problem: over the course of a career, even the most cautious and honorable professional is bound to leave a few behind them. So what can you do to rebuild a relationship, once it's damaged?
  • Just Got Into Work? Don't Open Your Email
    Many of us start our day by checking our work email, sometimes on our smartphones before we even get out of bed. The siren song of a teeming inbox is even harder to resist when we get to the office. After all, you can't just start your work day by ignoring your email -- can you?
  • 3 Ways to Combat Decision Fatigue
    Have you ever had to make so many choices in a given day that you just plain burned out your decision-making muscles? If so, congratulations: you are human, with all the intricacies and limitations that implies. Decision fatigue is real, and if you're suffering from it, the last thing you need to do is beat yourself up for "not having more willpower."
  • Is 'Clock Time' Making You a Less Creative Worker?
    Employers tend to organize work around blocks of time: the morning meeting is from 10 to 11, the orientation lunch is from noon to 1, and so on. There's nothing inherently wrong with that -- throw out the schedule entirely, and workers lose the pressure and relief of knowing exactly when their part of a project needs to be completed. But recent research suggests that concentrating on the clock at the expense of the task might make workers less happy and creative in the long run.