• How to Escape Your Own Personal Career Groundhog Day
    Punxsutawney Phil says it's going to be an early spring, and if you heard that in Bill Murray's voice, you are old. Just kidding, youthful Bill Murray superfans – you don't need to have seen Groundhog Day in the theater to appreciate its message. In fact, the movie is such a classic, it was deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant by the United States National Film Registry in 2006, and selected for preservation. What about the film strikes a chord, even 23 years after its release? Well, if you've ever had a terrible job, you probably relate to Murray's character, Phil Connors, a self-absorbed weatherman who's stuck repeating the same day over and over again.
  • The 10 Best Jobs for 2016 Are Mostly in Healthcare
    What makes a job good? According to U.S. News and World Report, which just put out its list of The 100 Best Jobs for 2016, it's a mixture of factors like salary, occupational outlook, and work-life balance. There's also, as the editors point in out in the methodology, the all-important personal preference. That last factor is important, if impossible to weight: there's no point in contemplating a career change to a job you'll hate, no matter how many openings there are or what kind of salary you can expect to pull down once you make the transition. That said, one thing immediately becomes clear perusing U.S. News's list: if you want one of the top-ranked jobs, it will help if you're interested in entering a healthcare profession.
  • Check Out the Worst Job Advertisement Ever
    Are you tired of job advertisements that raise your expectations and hopes only to dash them once you've learned more? Promises of flexible hours and a friendly work environment often fall flat once you arrive on the scene of the job, so you no longer believe the want-ad hype. Who can blame you? Certainly not Julien Viard of Australia, who is responsible for posting what might just be the worst job advertisement in all of history.
  • 4 People Who Actually Love Their Job (and How They Figured It Out)
    There are plenty of people out there who work the 9-5 grind without feeling much satisfaction about it at the end of the day. But there are also the lucky few who broke from the norm and have been able to successfully connect passion with pay. A recent AskReddit reveals who actually likes their jobs, and how they eventually figured it out.
  • Can You Save 1 Percent More This Year?
    Unfortunately, only a very small minority of workers are really saving enough for retirement. In fact, many aren't saving at all. Let's look at a couple quick statistics from a study done this summer by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) to see just how much folks are actually putting away. Here are a few facts.
  • Education Is Changing, But Will It Change How We Work?
    Considering how quickly the world is changing, it's actually surprising that the way kids and young adults are educated looks about the same as it has for the last 50 years or more. But just because high-school students still have their days broken down into about eight periods and store their materials in lockers, that doesn't mean that certain aspects of education haven't been updated. Actually, education is changing quite a bit in the U.S. these days, and these changes will have an impact on business and the economy in the years and decades to come. Let's take a look at a few of these shifts and consider how they'll matter in the future.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: 13 Signs You Need to Quit Your Job
    It's never a good idea to quit your job without having another job lined up. That said, sometimes there are signals that you should start finding that new job as soon as possible. In this week's roundup, we look at a few symptoms of a job that begs for your resignation letter, plus the best books to read instead of getting a life coach, and the interview follow-up you're not doing.
  • What's Next? Teachers Who Change Careers Have Many Options
    Teaching is difficult and interesting work. It can be wonderfully fulfilling and simultaneously almost unbearably frustrating and stressful. Generally, it's not the kids who make teachers want to move on to another profession. Rather, it's something about the system itself, the culture, that eventually adds up to be too much. Some teachers are driven away by the long hours and low pay, others feel they need to move on because of trying relationships with administrators or too much tension with parents. Others find the curriculum, or the accompanying standardized tests, too limiting and confining.
  • 4 Reasons Why Chasing Money Isn't the Same as Pursuing Happiness
    First things first: there's a difference between negotiating salary and chasing money. The former consists of you advocating for yourself, and insisting on being paid fair wages for your hard work; the latter confuses money with the stuff money is supposed to provide, namely security, happiness, and a bright future. Here's why chasing a big paycheck isn't necessarily the path to success.
  • Millennials Are Afraid They Won't Be Able to Get Ahead and They Might Be Right
    Despite the difficulties they faced entering the job market during the worst recession in decades, millennials have found their way into the workplace, even teaching older generations a thing or two about new ways to work along the way. But, financially, it's been a rough decade or so for the youngest generation of workers.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: How Will Your Job Change in 2016?
    The world of work changes all the time, often without our even realizing it. For example, if you were in the workforce 20 years ago, you likely couldn't work at home, whereas an increasing number of companies allow workers to do so, at least part-time. (Of course, on the other hand, you also didn't have to check your email on the weekends – technology giveth and technology taketh away.) In the first roundup of 2016, we look at the workplace trends that might change your job next year, as well as lessons to learn from even your worst boss and good habits to save you time and energy in the coming year.
  • The Career Lessons of Tough Love, aka 'Radical Candor'
    Former Google and Apple University employee Kim Scott is making waves with her approach toward clearing the air at work. Much like Festivus' "airing of grievances," her theory of "radical candor" can be a saving grace when you're out to make a co-worker or report a better and happier employee. While we're often taught that if we don't have anything nice to say, we shouldn't say anything at all, her approach gets out ahead of problems before they become unresolvable.
  • Why Unions Need Saving, and Why Millennials Might Be the Best Ones to Do It
    Labor unions have a long history in this country of protecting workers. Unions protect workers' collective bargaining powers and help them negotiate better wages, hours, benefits, job security, and working conditions. However, these days unions are in jeopardy, and it turns out that millennials could be the ones to save them. Let's take a closer look at this issue, beginning by examining some of the reasons why unions are in trouble.
  • What Do Your Childhood Dreams and Career Goals Say About You?
    When you were a kid, what did you say that you wanted to be when you grew up? If you're anything like the kids of today, your dreams started off a little unrealistic (think superhero or panda bear) and smoothed out over time, leaning toward things like doctor, teacher, or police officer.
  • Yes, You Can Learn Something From Getting Fired
    There's nothing good about getting fired … or is there? We think there are actual life lessons to be learned when you get the boot, and if you take them to heart, you'll likely be a stronger, better, more attractive person (or maybe just the first two). Either way, there are good things to learn from a horrible situation.
  • Why Your Child Will Likely Live at Home With You Until They're 35
    The Great Recession had an impact on every age group, but there is no doubt that it caused specific challenges for the youngest generation in the workforce, the millennials. After graduating with the highest student loan debt in history, millennials (born between 1980 and 1995) entered the labor market during a time of economic crisis.
  • 10 Quotes to Inspire Your Career in 2016
    It's that time of year again: another year down, and a new year is just around the corner. If this past year didn't treat you as well as you had anticipated, then don't beat yourself up over it, because it happens to the best of us. Remember, success is not the absence of failure – it's quite the opposite, actually. In fact, the wise words of Friedrich Nietzsche remind us: "That which does not kill us only makes us stronger." Take the lessons learned (or, the blessings in disguise) from the year prior and use them to make 2016 your best year yet with these 10 inspiring quotes for the new year ahead.
  • 6 Key Supports to Have in Place for a Midlife Career Shift
    Changing careers is more common than you might think. After a time, the excitement and novelty of a job, or even an entire industry, can wear off and we realize we need a change. Perhaps new management or protocol/procedures help to push us toward the decision. Maybe, changing careers (often during our mid-30s to early 50s) is about chasing a dream, old or new; and who needs a better reason than that? For one reason or another, a lot of people decide at some point along the way to shift careers. It can be an exciting and ultimately rewarding choice, but it's important to make the proper preparations before taking the leap. Here are a few key supports to have in place before making a midlife career shift.
  • 4 Surprising Facts About Retirement and How We're Getting Ready For It
    There is no shortage of reminders urging you to prepare for your retirement in advance – even in your 20s, as far in advance as you possibly can. These days, people are also considering other kinds of preparations that go beyond finances. For example, there's a move toward emotionally preparing for retirement, which seems like a good idea since new research has linked depression with retirement, especially for men.
  • Depression and Retirement Often Go Hand in Hand, Especially for Men
    For many of us, retirement inspires mixed feelings. Of course it's an interesting phase of life to ponder. But, fantasizing about how lovely it will be to wake up without an alarm clock, or to retire the suits and ties and dress shoes to the back of the closet only to be worn again on special occasions, is really only the beginning. Pretty soon we start to wonder: what would I even do with all that free time?

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