• 3 Ways Job-Hopping Might Mean Leaving Money on the Table
    A big incentive for jumping from one job to the next, in a relatively short space of time, is that it makes it feasible to climb up the income ladder. Every time you are offered a new job, it's an opportunity to brush up your salary negotiation skills and seek out better compensation. That said, there might be some ways that job-hopping can hurt your earning power or net worth.
  • Should You Tell Your Friends and Family How Much You Make?
    Discussing money might be the only real conversational taboo left in America. We've recognized, over time, that sharing our ideas and even our fears with trusted friends and family only builds our understanding and makes our lives better. These days, it's okay to talk about the troubles we're having with our children or even our marriages. We can talk about race, religion, identity, etc., outside of work. But, do we talk with each other about our salaries? Oh goodness, absolutely not. That's way too personal, and it's a conversation fraught with danger. But, what if this is a mistake? There may be some real upsides to loosening up our conversations about money.
  • 5 Things You Should Know About Working as a Nurse
    Some people are lucky enough to feel that they have a real calling toward one particular job or career field. Nurses tend to be these kinds of people. If you know someone with a profound desire to help others and a fierce work ethic and intellect to match, they just might work in nursing. But, while the job can be quite fulfilling, it's far from an easy career path. Let's get real about what it's like to work as a nurse in 2016. Here are a few things you should know.
  • Could a Little FOMO Be a Good Thing for Your Career?
    FOMO (or fear of missing out) is a very real feeling that your friends are having fun without you. When that fear creeps into our work lives from our personal lives, it takes the form of envy: somewhere out there, someone's career is advancing faster than your own. But could those (let's face it, kind of ugly) feelings of FOMO actually help inspire you?
  • The 4 Worst Cities to Find a Job
    The unemployment rate is down for the country at large, but the recovery has been pretty spotty and these rates vary widely state-to-state. It's important that folks looking for work understand the landscape of the current job market, so that they can make the best decisions for their futures. Recently, WalletHub released their report on 2016's Best and Worst Cities to Find a Job.
  • The 4 Best Cities to Find a Job
    The unemployment rate has been steadily improving for a few years now. The latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, a figure we haven't seen since 2008. Although there are still some concerns about whether or not pay is also on the rise, the job market seems to be improving – but not everywhere. When it comes to finding a job, some cities offer more opportunity than others.
  • Is It Ever OK to Tell the Boss You're Looking for a New Job?
    The employee/boss relationship is a tricky thing to nail down. You might think that everything's friendly, but things could change on a dime once you announce that you've got one foot out the door. What should you do to keep that friendly vibe going (and ensure you get a good recommendation in the end)? Think about it, before you blab to your boss that you're outtie-5000.
  • How to Get Promoted When You Work From Home
    An increasing number of Americans telecommute, at least part of the time. In 2014, 23 percent of the employed population did some or all of their work from home on days that they worked, according to the American Time Use Survey. Technology has freed workers from the need to constantly toil away at the office, but that flexibility is not without its challenges. For one thing, it can be hard to get ahead when the boss never sees your face.
  • 5 Reasons Why Your Employer Should Embrace Diversity
    Building a diverse company isn't just the right thing to do; according to research from Bersin by Deloitte, it's also pretty good for business. In a recent article for Forbes, contributor Josh Bersin wrote about why smart companies are making diversity and inclusion a top priority. Here's why your employer should be on board.
  • How to Protect Yourself When Your Boss Is Dishonest
    You've likely had a bad boss or two in your past, but have you ever had one that was corrupt, or who wanted you to act dishonestly? It can be quite the rock-and-a-hard-place situation, when the person who approves your timecards is asking you to break the rules (or the law). So when you're put in these awkward, or even dangerous positions, what can you do? Believe it or not, there are ways to fight back that don't include standing up and yelling, "J'accuse!"
  • 5 Signs You're Burning Out
    Burnout can impact just about anyone. But, people who are extra dedicated and committed to their jobs, or people working in particularly stressful and demanding positions, might be especially prone to it. If signs and symptoms of burnout go unaddressed, you could find yourself being forced to take a break from your job – whether you want to or not. So, let's take a look at a few common signs of burnout. Learning to recognize these signs, and slowing down accordingly, could help you save your career before it's too late.
  • How to Escape Your Own Personal Career Groundhog Day
    Punxsutawney Phil says it's going to be an early spring, and if you heard that in Bill Murray's voice, you are old. Just kidding, youthful Bill Murray superfans – you don't need to have seen Groundhog Day in the theater to appreciate its message. In fact, the movie is such a classic, it was deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant by the United States National Film Registry in 2006, and selected for preservation. What about the film strikes a chord, even 23 years after its release? Well, if you've ever had a terrible job, you probably relate to Murray's character, Phil Connors, a self-absorbed weatherman who's stuck repeating the same day over and over again.
  • The 10 Best Jobs for 2016 Are Mostly in Healthcare
    What makes a job good? According to U.S. News and World Report, which just put out its list of The 100 Best Jobs for 2016, it's a mixture of factors like salary, occupational outlook, and work-life balance. There's also, as the editors point in out in the methodology, the all-important personal preference. That last factor is important, if impossible to weight: there's no point in contemplating a career change to a job you'll hate, no matter how many openings there are or what kind of salary you can expect to pull down once you make the transition. That said, one thing immediately becomes clear perusing U.S. News's list: if you want one of the top-ranked jobs, it will help if you're interested in entering a healthcare profession.
  • Check Out the Worst Job Advertisement Ever
    Are you tired of job advertisements that raise your expectations and hopes only to dash them once you've learned more? Promises of flexible hours and a friendly work environment often fall flat once you arrive on the scene of the job, so you no longer believe the want-ad hype. Who can blame you? Certainly not Julien Viard of Australia, who is responsible for posting what might just be the worst job advertisement in all of history.
  • 4 People Who Actually Love Their Job (and How They Figured It Out)
    There are plenty of people out there who work the 9-5 grind without feeling much satisfaction about it at the end of the day. But there are also the lucky few who broke from the norm and have been able to successfully connect passion with pay. A recent AskReddit reveals who actually likes their jobs, and how they eventually figured it out.
  • Can You Save 1 Percent More This Year?
    Unfortunately, only a very small minority of workers are really saving enough for retirement. In fact, many aren't saving at all. Let's look at a couple quick statistics from a study done this summer by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) to see just how much folks are actually putting away. Here are a few facts.
  • Education Is Changing, But Will It Change How We Work?
    Considering how quickly the world is changing, it's actually surprising that the way kids and young adults are educated looks about the same as it has for the last 50 years or more. But just because high-school students still have their days broken down into about eight periods and store their materials in lockers, that doesn't mean that certain aspects of education haven't been updated. Actually, education is changing quite a bit in the U.S. these days, and these changes will have an impact on business and the economy in the years and decades to come. Let's take a look at a few of these shifts and consider how they'll matter in the future.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: 13 Signs You Need to Quit Your Job
    It's never a good idea to quit your job without having another job lined up. That said, sometimes there are signals that you should start finding that new job as soon as possible. In this week's roundup, we look at a few symptoms of a job that begs for your resignation letter, plus the best books to read instead of getting a life coach, and the interview follow-up you're not doing.
  • What's Next? Teachers Who Change Careers Have Many Options
    Teaching is difficult and interesting work. It can be wonderfully fulfilling and simultaneously almost unbearably frustrating and stressful. Generally, it's not the kids who make teachers want to move on to another profession. Rather, it's something about the system itself, the culture, that eventually adds up to be too much. Some teachers are driven away by the long hours and low pay, others feel they need to move on because of trying relationships with administrators or too much tension with parents. Others find the curriculum, or the accompanying standardized tests, too limiting and confining.
  • 4 Reasons Why Chasing Money Isn't the Same as Pursuing Happiness
    First things first: there's a difference between negotiating salary and chasing money. The former consists of you advocating for yourself, and insisting on being paid fair wages for your hard work; the latter confuses money with the stuff money is supposed to provide, namely security, happiness, and a bright future. Here's why chasing a big paycheck isn't necessarily the path to success.

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