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  • 5 New Career Paths That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago
    The workplace is changing, thanks to new technologies and new ways of thinking about work. If you're looking to venture into semi-uncharted territory in hopes of a brighter career trajectory, then you may want to consider one of these five new careers.
  • What's Happening to Casual Friday?
    Ah, the much beloved workplace tradition of casual Friday. Who doesn't love the opportunity to take a break from the painful shoes and the stuffy suits -- or even the boring business casual? Getting a day off from driving up that dry cleaning bill, and having the option to wear jeans and sneakers, is pretty great stuff as far as most people are concerned. But, are casual Fridays changing right before our eyes?
  • After 'Religious Freedom' Becomes Law in Indiana, Businesses Vote With Their Dollars
    On Thursday, Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, effectively allowing businesses to refuse to serve gay customers. In the days since, some companies have responded by restricting or terminating their investments in Indiana.
  • A Shortage of Substitute Teachers Causes Big Problems for Schools
    Sometimes, making progress in one area leads to new problems in another. The improved unemployment rate may be causing some difficult adjustments for schools, for example, as subs move toward full-time employment in greater numbers.
  • A Woman on the 20 By 2020
    Times change, and our understanding of the past changes right along with it. A great many things were different, say, 100 years ago, in America. For starters, women couldn't vote. In fact, the oppression -- marginalization is way too weak a word -- of women and minority groups was so abundant 100 years ago that there is hardly a comparison between their experience then and now. So, it makes sense that we see certain things a little differently today that we did in the past.
  • Google Chairman Manterrupts Female Tech Leader at SXSW to Mansplain Need for Diversity in Tech
    "Mansplaining" is a term coined to describe the behavior of those men who have the need to explain what they believe are complex topics, in which they may or may not be well-versed, to women in a manner that is elementary enough for even a woman to understand. This very thing happened at SXSW this week, except this time, the "manterrupter" got called out publicly. Here's how it went down.
  • NBA Asks Men to 'Lean In Together'
    The NBA, alongside the WNBA and LeanIn.org, recently released a new PSA. Featured big names, such as LeBron James and Dwayne Wade, speak about how they support the women in their lives. "When men lean in, everyone wins," the announcement declares.
  • Why We Need to End the 'All or Nothing' Mentality About Working Mothers
    If you're rolling your eyes at yet another working mother post, then you're the exact person who needs to be reading this the most. You, like most of society, sigh with annoyance that working moms are at it again, whining about how hard it is to succeed in a career because corporate America won't let you play with its toys. This article isn't here to prove you wrong or convince you that the Earth is flat -- its purpose is to ask that you step back from your conventional ideals and ask yourself, "Am I part of the problem, too?"
  • Warning to Job Seekers: The Commuter You Just Flipped Off Might Be the Hiring Manager
    It's every job seeker's worst nightmare. A man is running late on the way to a job interview, nervous, and he bumps into some guy boarding a crowded commuter train. He blows up, uses an incredibly rude expletive, and spends the rest of the time on the commute trying to calm down. Upon arriving at the interview, he and the hiring manager recognize each other -- the hiring manager is the guy he insulted earlier this morning.
  • The Gender Wage Gap Begins During Childhood
    America's gender wage gap is still a huge problem and even an international embarrassment. It's no wonder the topic has been coming up so much lately. But now, some especially startling data is rising to the surface about just how early the discrepancy begins.
  • Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is: Women and Money Talks
    A new study finds that women are more likely to discuss medical issues and other taboo topics with others than talk about money matters. We’ll examine the reasons why women are so tight-lipped about talking dollars and cents, despite their keen financial habits.
  • Teeny-Tiny Is the New Trend in Office Space
    It seems that if you want some room to stretch while you work, you may be better off in a prison cell than a modern workspace. Mother Jones reports that, soon enough, supermax prisoners will have more leg room that office workers.
  • 5 Takeaways From One Teacher’s Social Media Experiment for Her Students
    One Minnesota high school teacher, Michelle Van Bibber of Stewartville High School, decided to teach her students a valuable lesson about over-sharing on social media and how quickly things can go viral on the Internet. The lesson learned that day is one that doesn't just apply to our younger generations -- especially, it concerns working professionals who may not be convinced that their posts could negatively affect their careers.
  • Forbes: Today's Billionaires Are Younger, 'Poorer,' More Numerous
    Bill Gates topped Forbes' 2015 billionaires list, and the other top names will look equally familiar, including Carlos Slim Helu (No. 2) and Warren Buffett (up to No. 3 this year, and the biggest gainer on the list). Elsewhere, though, the list contained plenty of shakeups and new faces.
  • How the Great Recession Changed Millennials' Lives Forever
    It's not easy to "make it" in this country on your own. Every generation has struggled to find their professional path, to gain intellectual, personal, and financial independence, and establish a life for themselves. But, there is no doubt that the latest generation to enter the workforce, the Millennials, has had an especially difficult time getting started.
  • Social Media Data Is Being Used to Calculate Student Loan Risk in the UK
    Calculating risk is a complex process, particularly in the competitive student loans market. Basing decisions on potential earnings rather than current assets and income, as banks traditionally do, makes more sense when it comes to loaning to young people. Now, some companies are turning to social media, and checking out clients' connections, in order to assess the risk of the potential borrower, and also to put pressure on those who default.
  • Who Is Late to Work and Why?
    In a recent self-reported survey, 19 percent of Americans admitted to being late for work at least once per week, if not more often -- that is almost one in five working people. Forty-eight percent, or just under half, claimed to never be late for work. The question is, who are the chronically late folks, and why do they have so much trouble getting into the office?
  • Job Training Funds Go to Workers Who Need It Least
    A recent Georgetown University report on employee training trends and spending claims that the least experienced American workers are often the ones who ironically receive the least postsecondary job training from employers and educational institutions. "Employer training trends to be for the most experienced and most educated employees," summarizes lead author Anthony Carnevale of the study's revelations.
  • 'Women Make Better Leaders,' Says Research (and Mr. Wonderful of Shark Tank)
    "Women make better CEOs." These fine words come from none other than Kevin O'Leary, better known as Mr. Wonderful on ABC's The Shark Tank. O'Leary holds an impressive business portfolio, and 55 percent of the CEOs in it are women. Why, then, are women so exceedingly underrepresented in high-level, leadership positions still to this day? One ongoing study examined just that.
  • 5 Inappropriate Workplace Touching Lessons From Joe Biden
    Maybe you're a hugger, or a back-slapper, or -- in your personal life -- a terrible flirt. Chances are, you know that none of this behavior will fly in the office, no matter how innocent your intentions. No one wants to be referred to HR for remedial training or, worse, lose their jobs because they didn't get the memo that it's 2015, and co-workers don't touch each other. In this, we are probably more with the program than many of our leaders in Washington. Take, for example, America's touchy-feeler-in-chief, Joe Biden.