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  • How the Great Recession Changed Millennials' Lives Forever
    It's not easy to "make it" in this country on your own. Every generation has struggled to find their professional path, to gain intellectual, personal, and financial independence, and establish a life for themselves. But, there is no doubt that the latest generation to enter the workforce, the Millennials, has had an especially difficult time getting started.
  • Social Media Data Is Being Used to Calculate Student Loan Risk in the UK
    Calculating risk is a complex process, particularly in the competitive student loans market. Basing decisions on potential earnings rather than current assets and income, as banks traditionally do, makes more sense when it comes to loaning to young people. Now, some companies are turning to social media, and checking out clients' connections, in order to assess the risk of the potential borrower, and also to put pressure on those who default.
  • Who Is Late to Work and Why?
    In a recent self-reported survey, 19 percent of Americans admitted to being late for work at least once per week, if not more often -- that is almost one in five working people. Forty-eight percent, or just under half, claimed to never be late for work. The question is, who are the chronically late folks, and why do they have so much trouble getting into the office?
  • Job Training Funds Go to Workers Who Need It Least
    A recent Georgetown University report on employee training trends and spending claims that the least experienced American workers are often the ones who ironically receive the least postsecondary job training from employers and educational institutions. "Employer training trends to be for the most experienced and most educated employees," summarizes lead author Anthony Carnevale of the study's revelations.
  • 'Women Make Better Leaders,' Says Research (and Mr. Wonderful of Shark Tank)
    "Women make better CEOs." These fine words come from none other than Kevin O'Leary, better known as Mr. Wonderful on ABC's The Shark Tank. O'Leary holds an impressive business portfolio, and 55 percent of the CEOs in it are women. Why, then, are women so exceedingly underrepresented in high-level, leadership positions still to this day? One ongoing study examined just that.
  • 5 Inappropriate Workplace Touching Lessons From Joe Biden
    Maybe you're a hugger, or a back-slapper, or -- in your personal life -- a terrible flirt. Chances are, you know that none of this behavior will fly in the office, no matter how innocent your intentions. No one wants to be referred to HR for remedial training or, worse, lose their jobs because they didn't get the memo that it's 2015, and co-workers don't touch each other. In this, we are probably more with the program than many of our leaders in Washington. Take, for example, America's touchy-feeler-in-chief, Joe Biden.
  • Meet the YouTube Millionaires
    Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)
  • 5 Career Lessons Learned From Jon Stewart's Departure
    Jon Stewart's announcement came as quite a surprise to many. Many of his fans felt sincere, deep, and personal sadness; many also felt confused and shocked. Why would someone leave their career when it's seemingly at its peak?
  • 13 Incredible Company Perks
    From fledgling tech start-ups to household-name corporations, employers both big and small are continuously upping the ante when it comes to finding ways to keep their workers happy. While unusually cool perks like Etsy's playground-esque open lofts, or simply invaluable incentives such as the unlimited vacation days offered at Gravity Payments (that's right -- unlimited) might not be the deciding factor in someone's decision to accept a job, they can certainly be a factor. Smart employers know this, and make a point to incorporate additional takeaways into a job offer (besides the opportunity of employment itself). From onsite "Kegerators" to employer-subsidized egg freezing for female employees (seriously), here's a rundown of some of the most interesting perks* currently satisfying employees and enticing potential hires.
  • Working Moms Are Still Getting the Short End of the Stick
    Let's face the facts: being a working mother is exhausting and, oftentimes, completely defeating. Many women put their own career and life aspirations on hold to raise children, but very few of these ladies actually speak openly about the endless struggles they face on a daily basis. Here are the facts that you should know about the realities of working mothers and what you can do to help.
  • #SOTU 2015: Middle-Class Economics and Expanding Opportunity
    "The shadow of crisis has passed," said President Obama, in last night's State of the Union address. "And the state of the union is strong." While receiving standing ovations for job numbers (and getting in an ad-libbed dig at Republicans about winning the presidency), Obama outlined a vision for the country that focused on middle-class growth.
  • State Legislators Attempt to Shut Down Paid Sick Leave for Pennsylvania Workers
    In December of 2014, a task force in Philadelphia that was formed to study the issue of the benefits and pitfalls of paid sick leave came to its conclusion: Paid sick leave is necessary. Now, two Pennsylvania state senators are announcing their intent to propose legislation to preemptively prohibit mandatory paid sick leave for employees. Two steps forward, three steps back.
  • Unemployment Is Down, So Where Are the Wages?
    If you've been waiting for a fatter paycheck to find you in 2015, so far the news has been discouraging. Unemployment rates are down, which is exciting news, but we still haven't seen an improvement in wages. Here's why a lower unemployment rate hasn't translated to higher pay -- yet.
  • Man Gets Fired for Not Coming to Work for 24 Years
    Do you ever feel like nobody at work is paying attention to what you do, to the extent that you could stop showing up for work, and maybe no one would notice? A. K. Verma, a civil servant in India, did not show up for work for 24 years. Then, he got fired.
  • The Rise of the 'Uni-Moon' and the Decline of Work-Life Balance
    When married couples cannot even take their honeymoon together because they are unable to coordinate time off from work, something needs to change. This rather disturbing new trend is called a "uni-moon," and it is not helpful to work-life balance.
  • #FairPayMatters: What the World Needs to Learn From the Sony vs Charlize Theron Fiasco
    If anything good came out of the Sony email hack, it's that Charlize Theron put Sony on blast for paying her $10 million less than her male co-star, Chris Hemsworth, for their upcoming film, The Huntsman. Let’s take a look at how Theron’s ballsy move (pun very much intended) is encouraging women to quit the coy act and fight for their right to earn equal pay in their careers.
  • How Our Professional Lives Will Change in 2015
    As you prepare to make 2015 an excellent year, you might want to think about how the workplace is changing. Of course, it's not like a switch flips on January 1, neatly dividing the corporate trends of 2014 from 2015. But the first month of the year is still a good time to think about how work is evolving, right before our very eyes -- and what we can do to make our careers truly satisfying between now and next New Year's Eve.
  • What We Know So Far About Obama's Plan for Free Community College
    Yesterday, President Obama unveiled his plan to offer eligible college students two years of community college for free. More information about the America's College Promise proposal will be revealed today, alongside an American Technical Training Fund proposal, which would expand technical training programs that meet employer's needs and prepare more Americans for higher paying jobs. Here's what we know about the plan right now.
  • 3 Endangered Jobs for 2015
    Out with the old, and in with the new! While some industries are thriving in 2015, and anticipating further growth, other professions are struggling to stay relevant. Growth in the tech industry, for example, has been easy to understand and anticipate. But, other industries are paying a price for the changes technology has brought.
  • Want to Get More Done at Work? Do Less
    Some good news for anyone sick of 12-hour days at the office: the key to maximizing professional productivity may not be to work more, but rather to work less. According to a recent study conducted by the Draugiem Group, a social networking company, the average person remains productive for 52 minutes at a time. Using its productivity tracking app, DeskTime, the Draugiem Group analyzed users' time and tasks and found that the most productive 10 percent were those who worked for 52-minute intervals followed by 17-minute breaks, over the course of a workday that often lasted fewer than eight hours.