• 3 Reasons Why It's Tough to Teach in West Virginia (and These Other States)
    There are a lot of wonderful things about being a teacher, but it's a really difficult job, too. It's a profession that's immensely rewarding and immeasurably challenging all at once, each and every day. It's a job that's always changing – new students, new culture, new curriculum. The pay is relatively low, when measured against what other comparably trained professionals earn, and the hours are very long. (Yes, even when you consider the summer, despite what you might have heard.)
  • The 3 Most and Least Recession-Recovered Cities
    Since the Great Recession, cities have been struggling to recover their housing markets, job opportunities, and economies overall. The recovery has been spotty – in some cities and states more than in others.
  • Key Results of the 2015 Women In the Workplace Study
    Women in the Workplace, a recent study conducted by LeanIn.org and McKinsey & Company – building off of similar work done by the latter in 2012 – examines the current state of women in corporate America. Over 100 companies and nearly 30,000 employees participated. The survey results and accompanying data shed some light on the fact that women are still underrepresented at every level of corporate life, and the study goes a step further, examining the root causes of the problem. Let's take a closer look at a few of the key findings.
  • Nontraditional College Students Are the New Normal
    The landscape of higher education is changing. Online learning options, the high cost of tuition, fading tenure programs for professors – today's college experience looks very different than the one students encountered 15 or 20 years ago. But, maybe some of these changes were designed to address what might be the biggest change of all: the change in the students themselves. Let's take a closer look at today's college students in an attempt to get a better sense of how their circumstances and objectives have shifted in recent years.
  • 3 Alarming Facts About the Current State of Workplace Inequality
    Workplace inequality may sound like some "oh, woe is me" sob story that women are, well, sobbing about, but the reality of the situation is much more serious than most of us would like to admit. It's 2015 and women still earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. So what's holding women back in their careers?
  • LinkedIn Sent Your Friends Too Many Emails, and All You Got Was $1,500 (Maybe)
    Whether it's the canned kind or the sort that involves male enhancement products, spam is generally worthless – unless the spam in question came from LinkedIn, and arrived in your potential connections' inboxes repeatedly, with your name and without your consent. In that case, it might be worth a share of a recent $13 million settlement.
  • Peeple Might Be a Hoax, But You Can Learn From It Anyway
    Imagine a world in which every former boss, bad first date, or disgruntled colleague could complain about you online – and it would have the weight of a LinkedIn recommendation or a Yelp review. That's the dystopian future seemingly promised by Peeple, the as-yet-unlaunched app that would allow users to rate people as if they were restaurants or movie theaters. As you can imagine, the internet burst into flames, hounding the founders on social media until they took down their feeds, accounts, and even the company site itself. There's just one problem: some savvy watchers of internet brouhahas are now asking if the the whole thing is a hoax.
  • 3 Ways to Prevent Bad News From Ruining Your Productivity
    It seems everywhere you turn, something terrible is happening in the world and you can't help but let it affect you. What was once curiosity has now turned into full-fledged ruminating and you start feeling powerless and sad about the tragedies occurring around the world. Not only is your mood shot, but the bad news is making your performance at work go downhill, too. Don't worry, because there is hope. We'll discuss three techniques to help you deal with bad news more constructively so that it doesn't ruin your mood or, worse, your career.
  • If the Economy Is Improving, Why Don't We Have More Money?
    We all know that the Great Recession took a huge toll on Americans' finances. There's little debate about that. But, the recovery is proving to be more contentious. For an example, look no further than this morning's disappointing jobs report from the labor department. Let's take a look at what's going on with the U.S. economy and how it relates to your own financial bottom line.
  • To Fix Parental Leave, Make It Possible for Dads to Take It
    America's parental leave situation is dire. As you probably know, America is the only industrialized nation in the world that does not offer paid parental leave to workers, so working parents are forced to use accumulated vacation and sick hours to ensure some sort of income during their time off. Even if parents are lucky enough to have paid parental leave, they might not take it all. Why? In part, it's because dads often head back to work, even before their leave is up.
  • Are Performance Ratings About to Become a Thing of the Past?
    Employers have been using forced ranking, or stacked ranking systems for years, as a way to motivate workers and also to help manage and control salaries. However, the system has stirred up controversy since it gained popularity in the 1980s, and now a lot of companies are questioning the process and even eliminating it all together. Let's take a closer look at the reasons performance ratings might be about to become a thing of the past.
  • 'Pay Secrecy' Prohibited For Federal Contractors
    "It is a basic tenet of workplace justice that people be able to exchange information, share concerns and stand up together for their rights." That's what Labor Secretary Tom Perez had to say concerning the Obama administration's new rule, centered on the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, entitling workers to pursue fair pay claims. The main conclusion: you can now discuss, disclose, or inquire about your and your co-workers' pay — provided, of course, that you work for a federal contractor.
  • What Everyone Needs to Know About the Seattle Teachers Strike
    This morning, Tuesday, September 15, parents and students across Seattle woke up to the news that there would be no school again today. The teachers in the city are on strike, with huge consequences for families and kids, and for the teachers themselves. But, this strike isn't just about Seattle – it's about the state of the educational system in America, and it's about the way teachers are valued and treated. Here's what you need to know.
  • Is the Ideal Vacation Even Possible for US Workers?
    Did you take a vacation this summer? Do you wish you could've taken more time off? As fall draws near, so do the feelings, for many, of slight remorse caused by a summer spent mostly indoors, most often at work.
  • Want a Job in the Cannabis Industry? Start by Listening to This Podcast.
    The legal marijuana industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the U.S. right now, and a lot of people are wondering how to get involved. If legalization continues to spread throughout more of the 50 states, there will be even more job opportunities and even more folks hoping to secure a piece of the lucrative market for themselves.
  • 4 Things Educators Should Know About Teacher Shortages
    Education is a field that's ever-changing, as most teachers are no doubt aware. You have to be mighty flexible to be a teacher, rolling with the punches of curriculum changes, priority shifts, and societal/cultural evolutions that make your job feel brand-new each every year. (Sometimes, each and every day.) So, what's new in 2015? Well, teacher shortages, for one thing. Let's take a look at a few points educators should be aware of about this school year's job market.
  • Report: Technology Is Creating Jobs, Not Eliminating Them
    A recent Deloitte study based on 140 years of England and Wales census data found that technology has produced more new jobs than made existing ones obsolete. This is particularly true of "caring" occupations that require cognitive thinking, such as nurses and teachers, as opposed to "muscle power" occupations, such as weavers and metal-makers, which are more easily replaced by machinery. In other words, as long as we have brains and do our best to maximize their potential, we may not need to be terrified that we will be replaced by robots. While it's important to keep in mind that the Deloitte economists' assessment is limited to the U.K. workforce and thus not necessarily indicative of larger global trends, the study's findings do paint an overall rosier picture of technology's impact on human-occupied occupations in comparison to other recent studies.
  • The First Women to Beat Ranger School
    It's impressive news. Two women – Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver – overcame seemingly overwhelming odds to pass the Army's Ranger School, at Fort Benning, Georgia. It's a daunting feat for any soldier, but for female soldiers, it's also a milestone: until this year, they weren't even allowed to attempt the leadership course.
  • Women Over 65 Are Twice as Likely to Live in Poverty
    The gender wage gap is a persistent problem that's taking a long time to solve. The fact is that on average, women earn about 78 cents for each dollar brought in by men. And, new data suggest that this is having a significant effect on the state of women's finances in retirement.
  • Here's Why Millennials Want to Work Part-Time
    New studies show that millennials are choosing to stay out of Corporate America and opting for smaller companies that value employees and offer more flexibility. We'll take a look at why millennials prefer freedom and purpose (over money) in their careers, and figure out how the heck they're still able to afford pretty enviable lifestyles.

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