• The Future of Minimum Wage: More Money, But No More One-Size-Fits-All

    At the beginning of the month, Seattle's city council voted unanimously to increase the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour in stages over the next three to seven years. To get a business owner's perspective on the issue, we spoke via email with John Pepper, co-founder and former CEO of Boloco, a Boston-based restaurant chain with 22 units across New England. Pepper told us a bit about why a higher minimum wage isn't necessarily bad for business and what else needs to change for small businesses to thrive while paying their workers higher wages.

  • Are You Old Enough to Be Protected From Age Discrimination?
    There are a handful of laws on the books protecting workers from being discriminated against due to their age. However, not everyone is protected. Are you?
  • At Some Companies, Too Many Chances to Fix Bad Behavior
    Do you work with the employee from hell? Some company policies enable bad behavior by putting off consequences. Understand what is going on with management and learn to survive working with your toxic co-worker.
  • Should Companies Monitor Workers' Social Media?

    Thirty-nine percent of hiring managers use social media to vet candidates, according to one 2013 survey, and 43 percent of those said they'd decided not to proceed with a prospective hire, based on something they found online. A recent Wall Street Journal article asks, should employers be doing even more than that to keep track of workers' online presence, even after they're hired?

  • What If the Boss Wants Me to Do Something That's Against My Beliefs?
    Life and work would be so much simpler if everything was in black or white. Unfortunately, we deal predominantly in shades of gray. So how do you handle work situations with a boss who tests your limits and breaches your belief system? If only choosing your own boss was an option!
  • Why Obama's Executive Order Against Pay Secrecy Matters

    On April 8, 2014, President Obama signed the Non-Retaliation for Disclosure of Compensation Information into law. This executive order prohibits federal contractors from retaliating against workers who discuss their wages and salaries, but even if you don't work for the government, it's part of a trend that could affect your working life.

  • Some NFL Cheerleaders Earn Less Than Minimum Wage
    Most of us don't work in exchange for perks. Instead, we agree to pay that equals at least the minimum wage and expect to be paid for hours worked. Unless, of course, you are a cheerleader. Recent lawsuits brought against several NFL teams are shedding light on the alleged exploitation of women who are employed as cheerleaders.
  • Big Surprise: Raising the Minimum Wage Is Good for the Economy
    Opponents of raising the minimum wage continue to scream that paying working class people higher wages will destroy the economy and the American way of capitalistic freedom will end. We have hard evidence that this is simply not true.
  • Tell Me Your Salary, I'll Tell You Mine
    If you were absolutely sure your boss couldn't retaliate against you for revealing your salary to your co-workers, would you tell? Thanks to improved worker protections, we might soon find out.
  • Family Medical Leave Act and Veterans
    A recent National Law Review headline alerted employers to update their Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) policies. The federal government revised theses guidelines in 2013 to expand military leaves of absences. If you or a family member is a veteran or in the military, know which benefits apply to you.
  • The Rise of the Permanent, Unpaid Intern
    Unpaid internships were designed for students to get valuable training outside of the classroom. Some professions require supervised internship hours toward graduation and licensure. Unfortunately, the internship seems to have evolved into a default position that job seekers take to avoid not having anything at all. This is a problem, and it is also in some cases illegal.
  • Severance Payments Are Taxable

    Most people don't want to think about losing their jobs. However, it is best to know the law and to plan ahead just in case you get surprised by bad news. It may come as a shock to hear that severance payments are taxable.

  • The Gender Pay Gap: Do We Need More Laws or More Enforcement?
    Women deserve equal pay for equal work. There are laws on the books dating back to 1963 that are designed to protect women from being paid less than men for doing the same work. However, we continue to see complaints, such as the one against the owners of Kay Jewelers and Jared, from allegedly underpaid female employees. Is the answer more laws, or more enforcement?

  • Maybe He Shouldn't Go to Jared: Female Workers File Complaint Against Jewelry Chain

    A typical ad for Jared's jewelery stores shows women melting with gratitude after being presented the one thing that every woman, wants, in the world of advertising, if nowhere else -- a mined rock. According to some female employees of the chain, however, working for the company is less than a dream come true.

  • Which States Tip the Best and Worst?
    For tipped employees, the generosity of the public may mean the difference between buying a steak or asking the landlord for an extension on the rent. And some tipped employees rely on tips more than others, because in some states it is legal to pay tipped employees a couple of bucks an hour. When we compare tipping practices from state to state, we find some pretty strange results.
  • You Can Discuss Your Salary With Your Co-workers (No Matter What the Boss Says)

    Policies limiting your right to discuss your salary with your co-workers have been a staple of employee handbooks for years. There's just one problem: they're totally illegal.

  • Your Email Provider Knows Everything You're Saying About the Boss

    By now, most of us know that our employers are allowed to read our email. But what about the providers themselves? It turns out that the big tech companies like Google and Microsoft are probably reading your email ... right now. (Or, at least, their algorithms are.) The issue is whether or not you should care.

  • Union Leaders Are Exempt From the Law in Pennsylvania -- For Now

    The benefits of union membership are numerous, but unions were never conceived to give members or leaders the right to break criminal laws. Pennsylvania's House of Representatives just recently passed a bill that is as necessary as it is surprising.

  • The Department of Labor Has Your Back

    The federal Department of Labor (DOL) budget for fiscal year 2015 is official, and it includes new programs and additional protections for workers and employees. This is exciting news for millions of Americans, including the long-term unemployed, students who want to work when they graduate, and current employees whose employers may not be following the law as they should. Check out the changes that are being put in place to help you.

  • Thank Women for 2 Great Improvements for Working Folks
    March is Women's History Month. For all of the incredible accomplishments and contributions that women have made, often under terrible circumstances, to the betterment of society, working folks take this month to remember the women behind two of the most important laws put in place during the 20th century. These laws protect you every day.