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  • Want Your Own Place? Avoid These 5 Jobs
    It's a hard world out there for young workers. PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, shows that 24 percent of Millennials have to move home at some point after starting their career. Those numbers are worse if you're a woman: 28 percent of female Gen Y workers have to move in with Mom and Dad. While the economy is obviously a major factor in whether or not you can afford your own place, job selection also makes a difference.
  • Build a Perfect Boss: Here's What Every Generation Wants in a Manager
    What makes a great boss? PayScale's latest report, Gen Y on the Job, asked respondents to rate various managerial characteristics, including the ability to motivate, setting clear directions, organization, friendliness, ambition, and tendency to keep it professional. We learned that regardless of generation, workers want -- and perhaps more significantly, don't want -- similar things from their bosses.
  • Gen Y Lives With Mom and Dad
    Every generation likes to complain about how hard they had it when they were young. The economy was always terrible; school was always expensive; snow fell all year round, and everyone had to hike to their second jobs barefoot, both ways. However, PayScale's latest report, Gen Y on the Job, shows that the youngest generation of workers might actually have bragging rights -- the kind you don't want -- when it comes to coping with the most career challenges.
  • Portrait of a Worker as a Young Man (or Woman)
    What's the average Gen Y worker look like? Understanding that dealing in generalities is always risky when it comes to any demographic, there are a few outstanding skills that Millennials tend to possess. PayScale's Gen Y on the Job data package reveals just a few of the greatest things young workers have to offer.
  • How Much Are You Worth? What Millennials Don't Know About Negotiating Salary
    By now, you've heard that you should negotiate your starting salary before accepting a job offer. Failure to do so can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of your career. Knowing this, however, doesn't mean that negotiating is easy, or effective. If you're a younger worker, the challenges are even greater. Less experienced than your older colleagues, you're also less likely to know how to choose a target number. Recently, PayScale spoke with Tara Wyborny, Recruiting Leader at the G10 Associates Program at staffing company Genesis 10, to find out how Millennials can negotiate the best possible salary at the right job.
  • #PayChat Roundup: Millennials at Work
    Today's youngest generation of workers have skills, education, and technical savvy that employers need, but suffer from high rates of unemployment and underemployment, as well as fierce competition from older workers for coveted jobs. Today, PayScale hosted a Twitter discussion, together with Jessica Miller-Merrell, SPHR, founder of Blogging4Jobs.com, to talk about what Millennials want at work -- and what's standing in their way.
  • For Gen Y Workers, #TheStruggleIsReal
    The world of work is a mix of contradictions for Gen Y. The youngest working generation is at once challenged by the economy and empowered by technology. Inspired to innovate, Millennials are also occasionally hampered by expectations that exceed the reality (and budgets) of their employers. If you're a Gen Y worker looking for insight into your situation -- or a Gen X or Baby Boomer hoping to better understand your younger colleagues -- PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, will help.
  • #PayChat: Millennials at Work
    How are Millennials faring in today’s workplace compared to Gen Xers and Baby Boomers? Millennials entering the workforce today face many challenges such as unemployment, underemployment, and stiff competition for decent paying jobs.
  • Don't Let Your Parents Ruin Your Job Search

    Thirty-eight percent of workers between the ages of 18 and 24 have their parents involved in their job search, according to a recent survey from Adecco. Whether that's a good thing or a bad thing depends on the type of involvement -- and how visible it is to the employer.

  • Why Millennials Shouldn't 'Do What They Love'
    These days, it seems like the most popular career advice -- especially for the younger generation -- is not to just find a job. Instead, everyone from thought leaders to popular bloggers are advising recent college graduates to ditch the traditional hunt for high-paying dream occupations (such as doctor and lawyer) and instead “do what you love.”
  • Goucher College: Goodbye SAT, Hello YouTube

    College applications are a dreaded beast: prepping for, taking, and retaking the SAT or ACT, writing the clever and eloquent essay describing your 18 years on the planet thus far, begging teachers to write letters of recommendation, and then fretting over the final GPA on your transcripts. Now, imagine if all of that process was simply eliminated and instead of jumping through hoops, you made a video. No tests, no essays, no letters, no transcripts. That’s what one college is attempting to do.

  • The Relationship Between College Graduation, Race, and Time? It’s Complicated

    The race gap has narrowed significantly in college enrollments, with 65 percent of black high school graduates attending college, compared to just under 70 percent of whites in 2011, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. However, the gap in graduation rates remains wide and admission to college has little value if a degree isn’t the end result.

  • Work BFFs Are Important, But Millennials Value Them the Most [infographic]

    LinkedIn's Relationships @Work study found that 46 percent of workers feel that their friends at the office contribute to their happiness, both at work and at home. Millennials were the most likely to report positive impacts from their office friendships.

  • Right Brain, Left Brain: Which Side Do Leaders Need Most?
    The left brain is analytical, the right brain is creative, or so say many psychologists. In the past, good leaders used left brain skills more. Today, however, there is more need for right brain qualities in business. Perhaps we need a "whole brain" approach.
  • 3 Career Lessons Millennials Can Learn From  #GIRLBOSS
    Just a few years ago, Nasty Gal founder Sophia Amoruso was Dumpster diving for bagels, shoplifting, and hitchhiking her way across the country. She had no idea what she wanted to do with her life -- let alone for a career -- and yet, today, she is now CEO of a $100 million e-commerce company.
  • Old Economy Steve Is the Meme You Need for the Job Market You Didn't Deserve

    Hey Millennials, want to get enraged? Do we have a meme for you. Old Economy Steve, currently eyeing you dismissively from beneath feathered bangs at BuzzFeed and Quickmeme, has some wisdom to impart to you, the youth of today. Short version: you have it super easy, even though your life looks like dystopian science fiction next to Old Economy Steve's post-graduation years.

  • What College Graduates Need to Know About Creating a Personal Brand
    Thousands of college students across the country are beginning to graduate, ready to hit the ground running and enter the workforce. But are they really ready for what it takes to land the job of their dreams? These days, beginning your career means more than just writing a killer resume. Creating a strong personal brand is critical to establishing a reputation when you may have little to no experience.
  • Align Your Career With Your Interests, and Be as Happy as a Jelly Bean Scientist

    Flavor Scientist might sound like something Willy Wonka would dream up, but there is a person out there doing that job right now. Her name is Elise Benstein, and she works for Jelly Belly Candy Company, but her story is only a small part of a larger mission. Roadtrip Nation, a career exploration organization, aims to show workers that they can have careers that really interest them, whether that's picking jelly bean flavors or discovering a cure for cancer.

  • Why Do Graduates Leave Their State?
    Public colleges and universities rely heavily on state funding in order to offer affordable classes to their student body. However, in some states, that same student body leaves after graduation, essentially causing the public system of higher education to invest in the workforce for other states. The reasons for this are complex and surprising; it certainly requires more than a quick fix.
  • 3 Job Search Trends (and How They'll Affect You)
    The job search market is changing and fast. Social media has changed the recruitment landscape, creating a bigger and broader platform on which employers and prospective employees can connect and get to know each other. How do you catch up and stay ahead of the game?