• Who Is Late to Work and Why?
    In a recent self-reported survey, 19 percent of Americans admitted to being late for work at least once per week, if not more often -- that is almost one in five working people. Forty-eight percent, or just under half, claimed to never be late for work. The question is, who are the chronically late folks, and why do they have so much trouble getting into the office?
  • Meet the YouTube Millionaires
    Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)
  • What Millennials Can Teach Other Generations About Work-Life Balance
    The generation born between 1980 and 1995 is now firmly entrenched in the workforce, and they are committed to doing things a little differently than the generations that came before them. Their ideas are fresh and creative, and they bring unique experiences and special areas of strength to the table. With these differences in mind, it's not surprising that their professional goals, and the way millennials pursue them, are diverging from the path laid out by earlier generations.
  • The Birds and Bees of the Modern Office Romance
    In Mike Nichol's endearingly unrealistic '80s romcom Working Girl, Melanie Griffith portrays Tess McGill, an inexperienced but savvy young professional embattled in a competition for professional (and romantic) success with her powerful, idea-stealing boss Katherine Parker (Sigourney Weaver). The moral of the story? Do the right -- albeit slightly duplicitous -- thing, and you get not only your dream job, but also the guy you knew you always deserved.
  • 13 Incredible Company Perks
    From fledgling tech start-ups to household-name corporations, employers both big and small are continuously upping the ante when it comes to finding ways to keep their workers happy. While unusually cool perks like Etsy's playground-esque open lofts, or simply invaluable incentives such as the unlimited vacation days offered at Gravity Payments (that's right -- unlimited) might not be the deciding factor in someone's decision to accept a job, they can certainly be a factor. Smart employers know this, and make a point to incorporate additional takeaways into a job offer (besides the opportunity of employment itself). From onsite "Kegerators" to employer-subsidized egg freezing for female employees (seriously), here's a rundown of some of the most interesting perks* currently satisfying employees and enticing potential hires.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Gen Y Can Learn From Farmers, How PT Workers Can Manage Expectations, and Finding Office Space at Home
    Sometimes, the best career advice comes from unexpected places. For example, most office workers wouldn't think to turn to agricultural experts for wisdom -- but maybe they should.
  • 3 Things You Don't Know About Negotiating Salary
    To compile the recently issued Salary Negotiation Guide, PayScale asked 31,000 people whether they'd ever negotiated their salary. Fifty-seven percent said they had not. Given that not negotiating salary can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of a lifetime -- and that 75 percent of people who ask get at least some kind of salary bump -- it obviously makes sense to hit the bargaining table before you accept a new job offer or let your annual review go by without initiating a discussion about money. Still reluctant? Arm yourself with the facts.
  • 3 Women Making a Big Difference in Tech for Future Generations
    Studies show that women in tech are vastly underrepresented, but that's not stopping these three tech-savvy ladies from making a huge difference for future generations of techies. See how these women are using their know-how to pave a new path for a brighter and more balanced future in technology.
  • 5 Steps for Building Your Own Professional Website
    Whether you are a job seeker, an independent jewelry designer, a freelance journalist, an aspiring filmmaker, or the owner of a new food cart, a strong online presence is a key part of every professional and small business's marketing strategy. The backbone of this presence is your website. And unless your small business is a web design company, or you are successful enough to hire a programming whiz (in which case you would have probably already needed a website by now), you most likely have neither the funds nor skills to fork over thousands to a professional for the perfect site. Thankfully, in today's sea of freelancers, entrepreneurs, and independent contractors, a lack of money and programming knowledge does not stand in the way of a great-looking site that does not break the bank.
  • 5 of the Coolest Company Cafeterias
    Back in high school, the cafeteria's role as a road map for social status was limited to the seating arrangements of the people eating in it, but now it's the room itself that holds all the power. From in-house sushi chefs to onsite sustainable farms, companies around the country pull out all the stops when it comes to creating a state-of-the-art culinary haven for their workers. Here's a roundup of some of the most enviable examples.
  • Where Are Young College Grads Living? It's Not Where You Think
    Younger workers often flock to urban centers, trading the lower housing costs of the suburbs for the excitement (and easier commutes) of city life. But, which cities millennial workers are choosing may surprise you.
  • 3 Insights for Millennial Workers, From Anne Krook
    There's plenty of handwringing when it comes to the fate of younger workers, but precious little in the way of actual advice on the way to build a career in a tough economic environment. For PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, we sat down with Anne Krook, author of "Now What Do I Say?": Practical Workplace Advice for Younger Women, to get actionable insight into how Millennials can make the most of their strengths.
  • This Is What Millennials' Dream Job Looks Like
    What makes a good job great? Well, excellent pay, for one thing. PayScale's various data packages show that money almost always wins, when it comes to workers' priorities -- or, at least, their stated values. Beyond pay, however, there are other job attributes that appeal to workers. Gen Y on the Job looks at what Millennials want most at work, and what they're prepared to compromise on, in order to get it.
  • 4 Tiny Changes That Will Help You Work Smarter, Not Harder
    Many of us live to work, rather than work to live. According to the Department of Labor, the average American between the ages of 25-54 with children spends a whopping 8.7 hours on "working and related activities" each day, but only one hour on "eating and drinking" and two-and-half on "leisure and sports." While you're unlikely to convince the boss to let you cut your day short in favor of spending more time watching TV, you might be able to make a few small changes that boost productivity and get you out the door as soon as possible. Plus, if you take care of yourself, your time at work will be more pleasant.
  • Want Your Own Place? Avoid These 5 Jobs
    It's a hard world out there for young workers. PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, shows that 24 percent of Millennials have to move home at some point after starting their career. Those numbers are worse if you're a woman: 28 percent of female Gen Y workers have to move in with Mom and Dad. While the economy is obviously a major factor in whether or not you can afford your own place, job selection also makes a difference.
  • Build a Perfect Boss: Here's What Every Generation Wants in a Manager
    What makes a great boss? PayScale's latest report, Gen Y on the Job, asked respondents to rate various managerial characteristics, including the ability to motivate, setting clear directions, organization, friendliness, ambition, and tendency to keep it professional. We learned that regardless of generation, workers want -- and perhaps more significantly, don't want -- similar things from their bosses.
  • Gen Y Lives With Mom and Dad
    Every generation likes to complain about how hard they had it when they were young. The economy was always terrible; school was always expensive; snow fell all year round, and everyone had to hike to their second jobs barefoot, both ways. However, PayScale's latest report, Gen Y on the Job, shows that the youngest generation of workers might actually have bragging rights -- the kind you don't want -- when it comes to coping with the most career challenges.
  • Portrait of a Worker as a Young Man (or Woman)
    What's the average Gen Y worker look like? Understanding that dealing in generalities is always risky when it comes to any demographic, there are a few outstanding skills that Millennials tend to possess. PayScale's Gen Y on the Job data package reveals just a few of the greatest things young workers have to offer.
  • How Much Are You Worth? What Millennials Don't Know About Negotiating Salary
    By now, you've heard that you should negotiate your starting salary before accepting a job offer. Failure to do so can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of your career. Knowing this, however, doesn't mean that negotiating is easy, or effective. If you're a younger worker, the challenges are even greater. Less experienced than your older colleagues, you're also less likely to know how to choose a target number. Recently, PayScale spoke with Tara Wyborny, Recruiting Leader at the G10 Associates Program at staffing company Genesis 10, to find out how Millennials can negotiate the best possible salary at the right job.
  • #PayChat Roundup: Millennials at Work
    Today's youngest generation of workers have skills, education, and technical savvy that employers need, but suffer from high rates of unemployment and underemployment, as well as fierce competition from older workers for coveted jobs. Today, PayScale hosted a Twitter discussion, together with Jessica Miller-Merrell, SPHR, founder of, to talk about what Millennials want at work -- and what's standing in their way.

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