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  • 7 Resume Tips for Older Job Seekers
    Age may be a state of mind, but in many industries it could be the reason you're not getting the call for an interview. Discrimination based on age is illegal, but sadly, it exists. In many cases, it is factored in even at the resume shortlisting phase. Sometimes, years of experience don't exactly work in the favor of the applicant. So how do you prove your capability for the job? While it is difficult predict the outcome of an actual interview, here are a few tips to help you spruce up your resume, to at least land the initial interview call.
  • The Best Way to Stay Excited About Your Work: Take a Job You're Not Quite Qualified For
    We spend so much of our lives at work. While making money, having good benefits, and experiencing marked success are important, it might also be nice to actually be excited about the job you do. The benefits of having enthusiasm about your work, and passion for your job, are not to be underestimated, and staying challenged and stimulated by your occupation might just be the key.
  • Ask These 3 Questions About Company Culture Before You Take the Job
    During an interview, your potential future employer is checking out your education and skills to see if you are fit for the job. He is also thinking about how well you may fit in with the company culture. You, too, should learn about company culture before you accept. You can't work where you aren't comfortable and don't fit in. Ask these questions to determine if you'll be happy at your new job.
  • 3 Tips to Avoid 'To Whom It May Concern'
    The five little words, "To Whom It May Concern," have been used to kick off traditional cover letters for decades. We are programmed to begin our formal introduction to companies this way. Having been taught that this was the correct salutation for a business letter of this kind, most of us don't even question it. But, maybe we should. At best, the phrase doesn't do us any favors; it just meets expectations and gets the job done. These days, we can do better.
  • How Long Will It Take You to Get a New Job?
    It's always nerve-wracking to contemplate making a leap to a new job. In today's market, however, where 770,000 American workers have been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer, it's especially scary to consider what could be an extended period of time out of work. Even if you're lucky enough to have a job, it's exhausting to think of pulling double-duty, as you surreptitiously interview around your regularly scheduled meetings. So how long can you expect to look, before you land something?
  • How to Work for Companies That Focus on Social Good
    A few months ago, social media feeds exploded with friends and families dumping buckets of ice on their heads to raise awareness for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and encourage donations to research. This viral challenge, started by Pete Frates, who was diagnosed with ALS in March 2012, demonstrated the dedication of millennials -- and the companies they work for -- to social good.
  • 3 Questions to Ask Before You Accept a Job
    Congratulations! After what seems like an eternity of looking for a new job, you finally have that elusive offer. While the first thing you may be inclined to do is hit "reply" and accept the job, there are a few things you should consider first (if you haven’t already).
  • Don't Wait for Your Dream Job -- Create It
    If you’re looking for a new job, you’d probably prefer to have one that does more than just pay the bills -- one that utilizes your years of experiences and expertise, and yet challenges you. You know what you want, but the problem is, you’re not finding it. You may be browsing all the career sites all day long, yet not finding the perfect job of your dreams. Unfortunately, the reality is that your dream job may just not exist -- yet.
  • How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You an Interview
    Cover letters, although stressful and time-consuming to write, help the candidates tremendously when they are trying to distinguish themselves from the other applicants. If you want to draw the attention of hiring managers to your unique qualifications or even explain something that’s just not possible through the resume, a good cover letter is the way to do it.
  • How to Answer, 'Why Did You Leave Your Last Job?' When You Left on Bad Terms
    Sometimes, the reason you left your last job is because it was terrible. Your boss or company really was evil, or your co-workers were impossible, or the situation was otherwise untenable. Whether you were fired or force to quit, you will someday have to explain why you left your job -- probably at the interview for your next one. Here's why you should never bad-mouth your former place of employment, and what to do instead.
  • How to Attract More Recruiters to Your LinkedIn Profile
    There’s no question that if you are looking for a job, you should be leveraging LinkedIn. As the most popular social network for professionals, LinkedIn is not just a place for you to look for listings and connect with colleges, but the number one place recruiters go to head-hunt for candidates that they think might be the best fit for a job at their company -- even for jobs that haven’t been listed yet.
  • 3 Tips for Keeping Your Spirits Up During a Lengthy Job Search
    Looking for a work can be the hardest job you’ll ever have, and sometimes it can go on for quite a while. It can be a daunting, frustrating, humbling, and nerve-racking experience to search month after month for the right opportunity. New research suggests that having a positive attitude can have a profound impact on your job search.
  • Avoid These 3 Body Language Mistakes and Get the Job
    There is no guarantee that your body language alone will get you a job -- you have to have the right educational background and skill set, too. However, when you are competing for a position with other candidates who look as good as you on paper, subtle interactions during your interview can make significant differences. Avoid mistakes and look your best for your soon-to-be employers.
  • 7 Things You Should Know About Recruiters
    You've received a call from a recruiter and the conversation was rather pleasant. You feel the two of you have hit it off and that you now have a potential ally in your job search. But it's now more than a week, and you haven't heard back from the recruiter and there's no reply to emails either. So what's really happening? Why haven’t you heard back from your "ally"?
  • Starting a New Job? Here's How to Get Ready for Your First Day
    Starting a new job can be both scary and exciting. It’s a new chapter in your career and likely a step up in your professional game, opening up new opportunities to grow and challenge yourself. Just like the first day at school, the first day at work can be intimidating, as you get to know a new building, meet new people, and try to find the closest bathroom. While your first day will likely be a plethora of HR paperwork and orientation videos, you’ll still want to put your best foot forward and be prepared for anything. Here are a few tips to avoid jitters on the first day of your new job.
  • 6 Unusual Ways to Land a Job
    Whether you’re fresh out of school or you’ve been in the job market for a while, there are times when you have to get creative to pursue your professional goals. If the tried-and-true methods aren't working, perhaps it's time to try something a bit more daring.
  • 7 Tactics to Avoid the 'Overqualified' Blues

    Until now, you may have believed that it was a good thing to have lots of skills and an over-abundance of job experience. After all, you've worked hard over the years to build that portfolio and to earn every line on your resume. In the sometimes-backwards world of the job hunt, that gold-plated resume may actually be sending up red flags to your prospective employer.

  • How Should You Choose Your Job References?
    Most employers will ask for references, in order to establish that you're as good as you say you are, and to get a better idea of what you're like to work with. Here's how to choose references that put you in the best light and get you hired.
  • 5 Things You Should Know About the Reference-Check Process
    Most organizations check the references of a candidate applying for a job, before deciding to move ahead or drop his/her candidature. References essentially serve as endorsements of a candidate’s credentials, work style, and professional conduct. The company wants to make sure they are making the right investment on the right candidate.
  • How to Bomb Your Job Interview Without Even Saying a Word
    When you're preparing for a job interview, you probably spend the bulk of your time rehearsing answers to common interview questions, or researching the company. These are worthwhile ways to spend your time, but don't forget that when it comes to impressing a hiring manager, it's not just what you say: it's also how you say it. Here's how to master the silent aspects of communicating with a prospective employer.