• PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: What Beyonce Can Teach You About Job Interviews
    If you've ever experienced stage fright before a job interview, you'll see the parallels between performing and interviewing for a new job. Unless you're someone who loves being the center of attention, however, you might not think of that as a positive thing. In this week's roundup, we look at why one expert takes job interview inspiration from Beyonce; plus, some insight into the "9-to-5" workday in 2015, and a love song to the to-do list.
  • How to Answer Horrible Interview Questions
    Congratulations: you got an interview! Good on you for taking the time to prepare. Does the thought of 45 minutes of unfettered questioning send you into a cold sweat? Are you a shoe-in on paper and a mush-mouth in person? It's OK: most people are. In fact, 92 percent of Americans are stressed about at least one aspect of their upcoming job interviews. Tied for second place was the fear of not being able to answer a specific question.
  • From /r/CareerGuidance: How Do I Apply for an Entry-Level Job ... Before Graduation?
    Picture this: You're in your junior year of pursuing a computer science degree. And one day, while your working your crappy college retail job, it hits you. It's time to get super cereal about your career. But where do you start? How do you apply for an entry-level position? Allow us to explain.
  • 3 Tips for Providing an Exceptional Reference
    I can still recall the nervous feeling in my stomach when I made the call and then popped the question: "I'm putting in for a new position, will you be one of my references?" I didn't receive a formal "I do," but just like an anxious groom, I was elated to hear the voice on the other end of the line say "yes." While it's common to fret over how to select and ask for a reference, it can be just as nerve-racking on the other side: acting as a reference yourself.
  • Going Back to an Old Job Isn't the Worst
    Unless you've really burned some bridges, it's possible that you'll eventually return to an old job one day. There are a lot of reasons why this could happen, but it doesn't have to be the most awkward of reunions – or a step backward for your career.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: 4 Leadership Lessons From Bond Villains
    Some of the world's greatest entrepreneurs and moguls have a faint whiff of Bond villain about them. Elon Musk is in on the joke to the point where he's been known to change his Twitter avatar to a Blofeld-esque photo of him petting a cat. So it's not as strange as it seems to look to the bad guys of the Bond films for a bit of career inspiration. This week's roundup also offers tips for working from home, and advice on how to keep your secret job search, well, a secret.
  • The Hidden Rewards of Job Hopping
    What some call moving on, or even moving up, others negatively dub "job hopping." The decision to switch jobs relatively often is controversial. Will a company be willing to hire someone if their resume demonstrates a history of frequent job changes? There could be some downsides to switching jobs fairly often, but there are definitely some significant benefits as well. Let's take a closer look at the potential upsides.
  • Cover Letters Probably Don't Matter, But You Still Need One
    The job hunting process occasionally veers into the absurd, requiring job seekers to jump through hoops seemingly for no reason at all. Think of all the times you had to upload a resume into an applicant tracking system ... and then summarize your work experience on the next screen. And, how often have you sat down to write a cover letter, only to come up blank because your resume already includes everything you'd want to say? Well, good news/bad news on that last front, job seekers: a recent survey shows that your disdain for the cover-letter part of job searching is justified. The question is whether you'll ever be allowed to stop writing them.
  • Your Personality Type Might Affect Your Chances of Getting the Job
    If you've ever been asked to take a personality test as a part of a job application process, you know the strange pressure and confusion it can call up. After all, shouldn't our resume and interview tell our prospective employers everything they need to know about whether or not we're right for the position? These tests make us try to figure out which qualities (and which answers) the hiring team is looking for – and they can leave us wondering if we've hit the mark. Here are a few things you should know about personality tests and the hiring process.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: When Is It OK to Lie on Your Resume?
    The longer you're out of work, the less likely you are to get a job. This kind of employment catch-22 leads otherwise honest people to consider some less-than-ethical tactics ... some of them pretty creative. In this week's blog roundup, we look at why lying on your resume is still a really bad idea; plus, how to delegate, and a few tips on getting clearer instructions from your boss.
  • 7 Reasons Why You Should Work at a Startup
    Let me start by saying that working in a startup is a high-risk, high-reward game and not everyone can make that switch. If you click with the employer, the rewards are huge, but if you don't, well … hopefully you've gained something from the experience. If you are willing to take a risk, the learning you gain from the startup can be very enriching.
  • Elevated Careers: eHarmony for Job Seekers
    Online dating services have been around for quite a while now. The most popular, Match.com, launched 20 years ago (if you can believe it) and during those years, the public perception of this kind of resource has really shifted. These days, plenty of singles are grateful for the help, and many folks (one in 20 adults) report having met their current partner online.
  • Want a Job in the Cannabis Industry? Start by Listening to This Podcast.
    The legal marijuana industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the U.S. right now, and a lot of people are wondering how to get involved. If legalization continues to spread throughout more of the 50 states, there will be even more job opportunities and even more folks hoping to secure a piece of the lucrative market for themselves.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Should Women Even Bother Negotiating Salary?
    Here's a little controversy to wrap up your week: in her latest blog post, Penelope Trunk argues that women are penalized for negotiating salary, and for this and other reasons, they shouldn't do it at all. Whew. Find that, plus what happens when you don't take a vacation, and the best sites to help you land a job in 2015, in this week's roundup.
  • 3 Career Lessons From Hello Kitty
    Hello Kitty brings in 75 percent of Sanrio's annual $142 million profits, according to analysts, and she's cute as a button, to boot. But even with fame, wealth, and looks, Hello Kitty might not strike you as a model for your own career. (Unless you're Mariah Carey.) Here's what Sanrio's most popular character can teach you:
  • 4 Good Jobs that Don't Require a 4-Year Degree
    It's difficult to make good money without a college degree, and research shows that the gap is widening. According to Labor Department statistics, Americans with a four-year degree earn about 98 percent more per hour than those without one.
  • Want a 'Good' Job? Go to College
    According to a study conducted by Georgetown University, the job market is recovering, at least as far as low-paying and high-paying jobs are concerned. Between 2010 and 2014, the economy created 6.6 million jobs, and 2.9 million "good" jobs — or those that are defined by a median salary of $42,700 per year. The trouble is: 98 percent of those good jobs went to workers who earned at least a bachelor's degree.
  • The Worst Cases of Resume Fakery Hiring Managers Have Ever Seen
    In this job market, a lot of people might feel tempted to exaggerate their experience or credentials on their resumes in order to get ahead. But, lying on your resume is a bad idea – a very bad idea. You'll likely get caught, as hiring managers will seek to verify your claims. Even if by some miracle your lie slips past them, you'll reveal the truth when you start to do the job and your skill set doesn't line up the way it should. No matter how you cut it, outright lying on your resume is not recommended – but that doesn't stop people from trying.
  • Erase These Words From Your LinkedIn Profile Right Now
    We all want to stand out. With more than 100 people on average applying to every job listing out there, it can be hard to make your on-par job skills and drive translate into much more than "I'm the ideal candidate. No, seriously. I'm perfect for this." The problem might be that you're trying too hard to have the perfect profile. In fact, it's so perfect, everyone's saying the exact same thing.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Help! My Helicopter Parents Might Sabotage My Career
    Today's parents are pretty involved in their children's lives – often to a degree that seems excessive to those of us who grew up (or raised kids) in the '70s and '80s and were lucky if we knew we knew what a seatbelt was and that cheese didn't naturally form in pre-packaged single slices. Unfortunately, some of these helicopter parents don't let go once their kids graduate and join the work world. In this week's roundup, we hear from one such adult child, plus get some tips on what recruiters want to see on your resume and how to free yourself from negativity.

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)


Comp Managers: Start Here »
ADVERTISEMENT