• 3 Obstacles That Keep Women From Succeeding in Tech
    The gender pay gap exists across all industries, but it's smallest in tech, according to PayScale's report, The Truth About the Gender Pay Gap. But, that doesn't mean that everything is easy for women at tech companies. Various systemic issues in the industry can keep women from succeeding – or even staying – in STEM fields. Here's what's holding women back.
  • 5 Tips for Overthinking Less and Enjoying Life More
    As busy adults living in our modern culture of overwork, we shoulder a lot of responsibilities, and we feel under a tremendous amount of pressure to attend to all of them properly on a day-in, day-out basis. But, those of us who are prone to overthinking also have to deal with an additional stressor – ourselves.
  • Need to Play Hooky From Work? Learn From the Master
    You may have looked up to Ferris Bueller at one point in your life: a handsome rogue who knows how to bend the rules, get out of school, and put on a decent lip-syncing show. But he's a fictional character. We need a real inspiration, someone like Joaquín García , the man who reportedly didn't go to work for six years while still collecting paychecks. And while the reason he claims he didn't go is because he "couldn't find anything to do," your reason to play hooky might be a lot more serious.
  • How Highly Do You Value a Good Paycheck vs. Mental Well-Being?
    This week on Reddit, Phoenixfighter09 talks to the /f/personalfinance community about his current job situation. Unhappy, stressed out, and exhausted from toxic co-workers, he's debating quitting his job of six months and taking a massive pay cut in hopes of pursuing his real passion while also salvaging his mental health and personal relationships. Should he stick it out or should he quit? Let's unpack the details in this all-too-common scenario.
  • 'Presenteeism' Is Not Your Fault: Why Workers Come to Work Sick
    "If you're sick, stay home." You've heard that from experts ranging from the CDC, to WebMD, to your own mother. If you're lucky, you might even hear it from your boss. Still, many come to work sick, including over half of food service workers. The phenomenon is called "presenteeism," and researchers estimate that it costs employers $150 billion a year – more than either absenteeism or disability. So why do people go to work when they're sick? The reason why is pretty obvious: American workers feel they can't take time off, and a lot of the time, they're right.
  • Does Your Boss Pass the Teacher Test?
    A boss can make or break a job. An excellent leader inspires the entire team toward a shared vision, listens, and builds trust. A not-so-great boss, on the other hand, is the number one reason people quit their jobs.
  • 6 Tips for Making Your Co-Workers Like You More
    It's really nice to have friends at work. We spend so much time at the office, it's helpful to have some folks to pal around with while we're there. Plus, we often have a lot in common with the people at work; even if the similarities only boil down to sharing the experience of the job itself. It can be helpful to talk to co-workers about what's going on around the office or even in the industry. Often the people in our personal lives don't really understand, or they're not as interested as co-workers might be.
  • How to Work With Friends
    It's no secret that we spend a lot of time with our co-workers. In fact, while there's only about a 52 percent chance of us spending 30 hours a week with our family, there's a 91 percent chance we will spend that much time with our co-workers. Like it or not, they're the people that get the most of our time: friendship may very well be inevitable. When you do begin to form those bonds of camaraderie, here's how to keep it from getting weird.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Is Your LinkedIn Profile Helping Other People Get Hired?
    Recruiters do not care about you. OK, that sounds harsh. A better way of putting it might be, "Recruiters care about finding stellar candidates, which may or may not include you." The goal when you're buffing up your LinkedIn profile is to make sure that it's driving recruiters toward you, and not toward your friends and colleagues. In this week's roundup, we look at expert advice that will help you tighten up the leaks in your Linkedin, plus how to deal with a toxic work environment, and which questions to ask in order to start off a new job on the right foot.
  • 7 Big Ways Emotional Intelligence Can Help You Get Ahead
    Our resumes and online professional profiles are chock full of pieces of evidence chosen to support and justify our qualifications. But, it turns out that our emotional intelligence (a trait rarely highlighted during the job search process) could be one of the greatest determinants of our professional success. Emotional intelligence is more important that most folks realize. Here's how it helps you at work.
  • What Is the Value of Emotional Labor at Work?
    Remembering birthdays, planning the holiday party, showing a new team member around the office and where the best nearby coffee shop is: these are all examples of emotional labor at work. While many happy employees would like to think of themselves as completely willing to take on these seemingly small tasks, more often than not, they fall on female workers. Just as at home, the majority of this type of care and support in the workplace is expected of women in ways it might not be from their male co-workers. What's the impact of such expectation?
  • Do Fun Office Perks Actually Make Workers Less Creative?
    Flashy office perks like ping-pong tables, free backrubs, and unlimited snack foods might help keep you in the office, but do they make you better at your job? Not necessarily. If you're wondering why your creative work environment isn't sparking more innovation, those fancy perks could be to blame. Here's how your cool office could be killing your creativity.
  • Should You Tell Your Co-Workers How Much You Make?
    Americans spend a lot of time at work. It's no wonder that co-workers turn into sincere friends sometimes, given how much we're together. But, there is one topic of conversation that even the closest co-worker buds tend to avoid – discussions of salary. There might be some really good reasons to start talking about it though, despite the fact that money discussion makes us a little uncomfortable. Let's look at this issue a little more closely in order to understand the potential benefits and drawbacks of discussing compensation with co-workers.
  • Your Office Needs a Climbing Wall
    Silicon Valley workplace trends have been spilling out of California and into the rest of the country for quite some time now. Not surprisingly, researchers are starting to investigate the effects of these perks on workers' health, productivity, and happiness. One perk that might make the cut: an office climbing wall. Let's take a closer look at how you might benefit from having one at your workplace.
  • Who's Finding Romance at Work?
    Maybe it's because they don't need to flirt in the office when they have a million apps that can connect them with the potential love of their life, but Millennials are the least likely to date someone at work, according to Vault's recently released 2016 Office Romance Survey. The survey showed that 44 percent of Millennials (ages 18 to 34) had engaged in an office romance, while 59 percent of Gen X and 66 percent of Baby Boomers had done so. Of course, the explanation could always be as simple as time spent: the older you are, the more time you've had to fall in love with your cubicle neighbor.
  • Show Your Coworkers How You Feel With PayScale Valentines
    Valentine's Day is a lot of pressure, whether you're in a relationship or not. Flowers, candy, expensive dinners ... it gets overwhelming, fast. So if you've wandered into the office today and realized that you don't have any tokens of the (strictly platonic unless sanctioned by HR) love you feel for your coworkers, PayScale is here to help with office-appropriate Valentine's Day e-cards. Enjoy!
  • Say This, Not That: 5 Ways to Stop Apologizing at Work
    As an introvert in the office, I constantly feel the need to say "sorry" every time someone has to go out of their way for me. This is not only a problem in the workplace, but a problem outside the workplace, too. Think about it, fellow introverts: do you remember the last time you were at a restaurant and you had to ask the waiter to fix your order because they gave you chicken pot pie instead of turkey pot pie? Let's be real – you probably felt bad about asking them to fix it, and you probably apologized to your waiter. The next time you're in a situation like this, especially at work, follow these tips to help yourself speak more articulately and positively.
  • 5 Reasons Why Your Employer Should Embrace Diversity
    Building a diverse company isn't just the right thing to do; according to research from Bersin by Deloitte, it's also pretty good for business. In a recent article for Forbes, contributor Josh Bersin wrote about why smart companies are making diversity and inclusion a top priority. Here's why your employer should be on board.
  • Are Attractive People Rewarded With Better Grades and Higher Earnings?
    We know that motivation, talent, and maybe a little bit of luck are a great recipe for success, but what if there are other factors at play as well? Does a person's level of attractiveness impact the trajectory of their career? Let's take a look at some of the latest research and information on the topic to discover whether or not attractive people are rewarded professionally for their looks.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: To Be a Strong Leader, Embrace Vulnerability
    When is strength actually a weakness? When it's a facade of toughness, rather than the real deal. This special kind of workplace machismo can keep leaders from asking questions, and when it does, real problems result, both for companies and for the individual who's trying so hard to project strength. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to embrace vulnerability, plus how to get along better with co-workers, and the big mistakes you're probably making on social media, right now.

Find Out Exactly What You Should Be Paid

United States (change)


Comp Managers: Start Here »
ADVERTISEMENT