• Obama Signs an Executive Order Extending Student Loan Debt Cap

    Yesterday, President Barack Obama sat down with Tumblr founder David Karp to do a live Q&A on the service, answering questions about student loans and his recent executive order expanding the Pay-as-You-Earn program.

  • College Choice: Substance Trumps Style for a Happy Life

    Feeling pressured to gain acceptance to an elite college? Don’t. According to a new Gallup-Purdue University study, it’s not where you study that matters in life, but what happens while you’re there. Researchers surveyed 30,000 college graduates and found that a person’s overall well-being and engagement in their work after college has little to do with where they went to school, but rather is influenced by the formative experiences they had while they were there.

  • What's in a Name? Discrimination, If You're a College Student

    Finding a college professor to mentor you may not be easy, unless you’re a white male or at least appear to be one by name alone. In a recent study of more than 6,500 professors at the top 250 schools, researchers found that professors were more likely to deny opportunities to women and minorities -- a bias that appears after only knowing a student's name. This is especially evident in faculty linked to more lucrative professions.

  • How Long Will It Take to Pay Off Your Student Loans?

    Over 70 percent of college seniors carry student loan debt. The average amount owed? $29,400 per borrower. For an entering first-year student, who might never have earned more than minimum wage at an after school job, that's an incomprehensible amount of money.

  • What's the Best Business School for You? BestMatch Goes Beyond Traditional MBA Rankings

    If you're thinking about getting an MBA, you've probably seen a lot of lists that rank the best business schools in the country. The problem is, none of those lists help you figure out which school or program is the best match for your specific needs. Launched in February 2014, BestMatch aims to help students see past the brand names and the hype to find the MBA program that will give them the career they want.

  • College Grads: Hiring to Increase Nearly 9 Percent

    The Class of 2014 may not have to don fast food uniforms after the caps and gowns come off. Employers that hire new grads are feeling optimistic about the market and plan to hire 8.6 percent more college graduates this year as compared to last. Starting salaries for this year's class are also up by 1.2 percent, all this according to a recent survey released by The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

  • 8 Alternatives to a 4-Year Degree
    Life after high school or at a time of transition is like a Choose Your Own Adventure novel, and sometimes seeing that you have choices is all that matters. Here’s a list of ideas that will jump-start your brainstorming if traditional college is not for you.
  • What Is the Most Underrated College in Your State? [infographic]

    Every state in the US has at least one “hidden gem” of a college, one that can claim both high acceptance rates and excellent academics. Too often, those gems are overlooked in the scramble to be accepted to the more exclusive schools. Recently, Business Insider teamed up with Niche to determine the most underrated college in each state.

  • Is Your College Major on the Decline?

    What a difference a few decades make. In 1970, just over 14 percent of bachelor's degree recipients majored in business. In 2010, it was 22 percent. Looking at plain numbers, the change is even starker: 115,000 in 1970, and over 360,000 in 2010. Why do we now have triple the number of graduates with business degrees, and which areas of study have declined as that major surged?

  • As Job Market Heats Up, More High School Seniors Skip College

    Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that 66 percent of 16- to 24-year-olds who graduated from high school in 2013 enrolled in college that fall -- the lowest number since 2006. This is the third decline in the past four years, writes Ben Casselman at FiveThirtyEight.

  • STEM Classes Equal Better Pay, But Students Don't Care
    Students who choose STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors usually make more money after graduation than those who choose non-science fields. Even taking a few STEM classes can boost job security and earnings. However, high school students couldn't care less. This is a problem for us all.
  • Public Colleges Are Getting More Expensive, and Here's Why

    If it seem like tuition costs are out of control, it's not your imagination. Higher education is expensive, even at a public institution, where the average tuition and fees averaged about $14,300 during the 2011-2 academic year. Meanwhile, the median household income in the US was approximately $50,500 for 2011. Do you know anyone who could afford to part with 28 percent of their family income, even for a good investment like education?

  • The Harvard Handout: Wealthy Donors Giving Big Money to Already Rich Colleges
    Recently, Slate's Matthew Yglesias argued against donating large amounts of money to wealthy schools like Harvard University. His position is that Ivy League schools already have huge endowments, and that most of the students attending these elite schools have wealthy families supporting them financially.
  • 'Tuition' Is a Beyonce-Inspired Plea for Student Debt Forgiveness

    Seventy-one percent of college seniors carry student loan debt; worse, 35 percent of college graduates under 30 are "seriously delinquent" in paying their loans, which means that they haven't made a payment for 90 days or longer. Meanwhile, unemployment remains high among recent graduates and real wages have declined. What's a cash-strapped college grad to do? Make a Beyonce parody video, obviously.

  • Work Colleges Offer a Unique ROI
    Many students graduate with epic amounts of student loan debt -- unless they attend one of seven work colleges in the US. These colleges require students to be employed at the school in any one of a variety of roles, both to earn money for tuition and to gain real-life work experience as they go, thus making college more affordable.
  • Is It Still Worth It to Study Humanities?

    Take a look at the top schools in PayScale's College ROI data package, and one thing quickly becomes clear: If you want to become a millionaire (or at least, a hundred-thousandaire) by working, majoring in a STEM field is a good foundation. But that doesn't mean that majoring in humanities is a waste of your time, even from a financial perspective.

  • Learn to Love 'Bad' Grades, Make More Money Later On

    Why do fewer women major in STEM fields? In part, research suggests, it's because they don't want to risk earning less-than-amazing grades -- even if a B in a science field would allow them to graduate with a better-paying degree than an A in humanities.

  • New Aid for Undocumented Students: Which Schools Offer the Best ROI?
    Washington State recently became the fifth state to enact legislation offering financial aid to students who arrived in the country illegally by way of their parents. Now that college is within reach of a new population, finding the right school for the money becomes the next hurdle.
  • State vs. Student: Who Spends More on Public Higher Education
    The cost of public higher education is increasingly being shouldered by students, rather than state governments. Data compiled by the Chronicle of Higher Education illustrates the significance of that shift beginning in the year 2000, when 93 percent of states paid more than students for public higher education, in comparison with 2012, when the number of states carrying more of the cost had dropped to 52 percent.
  • These 3 Schools and Degrees Have the Worst ROI

    We've written a lot about the colleges and majors that offer their graduates the best return on investment for their tuition dollar. But what about the schools and degrees that have the worst? Using PayScale data, The Atlantic decided to find out.