• Fair Pay and Healthcare: 4 Takeaways From the 4th Democratic Debate
    Watching the latest Democratic debate less than a week after the Republican debate, you're immediately struck by the differences between the two parties' events at this stage of the election cycle. It's not just the unsurprising fact that conservatives and liberals disagree on the major issues; it's that the Democrats, who have only three candidates vying for the nomination, have enough time to get into (slightly) more in-depth discussions about their proposals. Barring that, they've at least got more room, both metaphorically and physically on the stage, to argue with one another.
  • #BigBlockofCheeseDay: Jobs, the Gender Pay Gap, Family Leave, and More
    If you love cheese and you love politics, today is your day on Twitter. OK, fine, the cheese part is just a fun historical reference, wrapped up in a hashtag; Big Block of Cheese Day, first coined on the show The West Wing, dates back to an open house held by President Andrew Jackson in 1837. The reception was Jackson's last in office, and featured a 1,400-pound wheel of cheese and 10,000 guests from the general public. Today, of course, we don't need fromage and an open door to speak to our government directly – we just need Twitter. For the third year in a row, advisors like Vice President Biden and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez took to Twitter to answer the public's questions.
  • What College Students Need to Know About the Gender Pay Gap
    Before I was aware of the gender wage gap, I thought – as any rational person would – that employees would be paid the same for their same quality of work regardless of gender. But alas, this is not the case. The reality is, at least for a few years, the gender pay gap is here to stay. So that invites the question: as a young woman looking to enter the workforce in a few years, what should I do about the gender pay gap?
  • Just Stop Saying Sorry in Emails, With This App
    Do you ever look at your emails long after you've hit "send" and cringe, not because of the occasional typo, but because your message reads more like an apology than a statement? If you're a working woman, the answer is probably "yes." Now, thanks to Cyrus Innovation's new Chrome plug-in Just Not Sorry, we can catch those second-nature apologies and qualifiers before we email them, not after.
  • What You Can Learn From the Highest-Paid Women in Music
    Even though most of us can't compare to the highest-paid women in the music industry in 2015, we can still learn something from their business savvy and success. Forbes has details on the top earners, and we offer some tips on what some of them have done so well in 2015, even though none of them even released an album last year.
  • Could Crying at Work Get You What You Want?
    We all know there's no crying in baseball, but could getting emotional at work actually work to your advantage? Politicians have been known to get a little verklempt at times, to make them seem more human and relatable and less like robots (or maybe they were really sad). It could stand to reason that the workplace is an OK place to let down your emotional barriers from time to time.
  • What Today's Kids Say They Want to Be When They Grow Up
    When you were younger, how did you answer the question, "What do you want to be when you grow up?" These days, there is a lot of evidence to suggest that this is a question we really shouldn't even be asking little kids; it might be sending the wrong message about identity. But, since the question persists, we might as well take a look at some of the answers kids are providing. They shed interesting light on the different messages boys and girls are receiving about potential career options, and how these messages have changed over time.
  • 5 Shocking Statistics PayScale Uncovered in 2015
    At PayScale, we really love data. Throughout 2015, we used data to tackle some of the most debated topics in the career world, as well as to shed some light on common misconceptions about data. PayScale's reports cover everything from the gender pay gap to the cost and reward of higher education. And sometimes, we analyze qualitative data, like how workers feel about their jobs. For example, which jobs are the most meaningful, and more importantly, which are the most meaningless? And, do women really only make 78 cents for every dollar a man makes?
  • These 9 Feel-Good Career Stories Will Give You Hope for 2016
    With 2015 coming to an end and a new year just around the corner, it's nice to reflect on some of the positive things that have happened in the career world this year, from companies offering increased paid family leave to millennials teaching us what success should look like in the future. Here are a few of the top career stories of 2015 to help close out the year on a good note.
  • Ladies, If We Want Change, We Have to Do It Ourselves
    Women have been fighting for equality for some time now and they show no signs of stopping until the battle has been won, once and for all. Women still face many inequities today that prevent them from reaching their full potential in their personal and professional lives, but it's not only women who are negatively impacted by gender imbalances – business and the economy as a whole suffer when women are deprived of the same opportunities as men. If you want things to change sooner than later, ladies, it's time to take matters into your own hands – because, as Laurel Thatcher Ulrich said, "Well-behaved women seldom make history."
  • Lena Dunham and Emma Stone Discuss Nicknames in the Workplace
    Hopefully, it's a rare occurrence these days for a male co-worker or boss to summon a woman at the office with a demeaning nickname like "sweetie," or "honey," or (heaven forbid) "baby." Unfortunately though, it does still happen.
  • 5 Ways You Can End the Gender Pay Gap
    Regardless of how you look at the data, women make less than men in their careers and we have to do something to fix this issue. As the great Mahatma Gandhi once said, "Be the change that you wish to see in the world," so here are five ways to help you be that change and end the gender pay gap once and for all.
  • US Military Opens Combat Jobs to Women
    Yesterday, Defense Secretary Ash Carter ordered the U.S. military to open combat roles to women, including about 220,000 jobs in infantry, armor, and special operations units. All branches, including the Marine Corps, which previously asked for an exception, will have 30 days to submit plans outlining how they will make the change by April 1.
  • When Can You Talk About Salary?
    Recently, Bradley Cooper made headlines when he stood up for fellow actor Jennifer Lawrence, who was paid significantly less than her male costars on a movie project. He pledged to start talking to his co-workers about what he was making, in an effort to help them negotiate better contracts, telling Reuters: "Usually you don't talk about the financial stuff, you have people. But you know what? It's time to start doing that." But for us lowly non-Hollywood types, talking about salary might be a bit more complicated.
  • 4 Ways Impostor Syndrome Could Actually Be a Good Thing
    Impostor syndrome is a term used to describe the feeling of professional inadequacy (or even fakery) that exists despite evidence that indicates that the opposite is true. Generally, this "syndrome" is perceived to be a bad thing – as the name itself implies. But, is impostor syndrome all bad? Consider these four reasons why impostor syndrome might actually be a good thing.
  • Work-Life Balance Matters for Child-Free Folks, Too
    American opinions toward family and work are changing. Mothers are choosing to lean in, men are taking time off to rear their children, and some workers are choosing not to have kids at all. So why do we talk about work-life balance mostly in the context of raising a family and maintaining a career?
  • 'How I Make It Work': 10 Working Parents Share Their Coping Strategies
    Does work-life balance even exist? Ask any working parent how they manage to hold down a job, take care of their family, and carve out time for themselves – at least enough to go to the dentist semi-regularly and maybe eat a vegetable now and then – and you're likely to get an earful. The upshot: balance is hard to achieve, hard enough to make many wonder if the whole thing is a myth.
  • The Jobs Gap: Why the Uncontrolled Gender Pay Gap Is Worse Than 78 Cents on the Dollar
    On the surface, PayScale's latest report on the gender pay gap seems like good news: when controlled for factors like job title, experience, and education, the data show that women currently earn 97 cents for every dollar a man earns. That 2.7 percent gap isn't the 0.0 percent we'd like, but it's a lot better than the 78-cents-on-the-dollar figure we often hear reported. But, if we look at the uncontrolled data, and compare all working women's earnings to those of all working men, the gap gets significantly larger – 74 cents to the dollar, for a gap of 25.6 percent.
  • Is the Gender Pay Gap a Myth? 3 Highlights From PayScale's Reddit AMA
    Earlier today, PayScale did a Reddit AMA to discuss its latest report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap. Hosted by PayScale's Vice President of Data Analytics and Lead Economist Katie Bardaro, Senior Director of Editorial and Marketing Lydia Frank, Senior Managing Editor Aubrey Bach, and Lead Data Analyst and Data Visualization Specialist Gina Bremer, the AMA addressed everyone's most pressing questions about the gender pay gap – including the ever-popular, "Isn't the gender pay gap a myth?"
  • PayScale's Reddit AMA: Inside the Gender Pay Gap
    We often hear the statistic that women make 78 cents for every dollar a man earns, but is that number accurate, and if so, does it tell the whole story? On Tuesday, November 17, at 10:30 a.m. PST (and 1:30 p.m. EST), PayScale will do a Reddit AMA to discuss the gender pay gap. We'll answer all your questions about why women still earn less than men in every industry, and what can be done to fix the problem. Read on for details about how to attend our latest Reddit AMA, and ask our compensation experts anything.

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