• The Best and Worst States to Be a Working Mother
    Some states offer new parents and families additional protections in the workplace, on top of federal protections. Many, however, do not. How does your state stack up?
  • Leveling the Playing Field for Working Women
    Although we're a long way from total pay equality, there are still some professions that pay women as much as their male counterparts, if not more. Here are some of the best industries that are exercising fair pay.
  • Women Need to Fall in Love With Computer Science ASAP

    Last month, Google revealed, for the first time ever, just how big the company’s gender gap is. Only 30 percent of Google’s overall employees are women and when looking specifically at tech-related jobs, the number drops to 17 percent. As it turns out, Google isn’t the only tech company with alarmingly low numbers of women.

  • Is Work-Life Balance Possible?
    Today's busy working families need about 28 hours in the day to get everything done. Work hours have crept into our home lives as more people take care of job responsibilities in the evenings and on weekends. In this environment, is it even possible to balance our careers and our personal lives?
  • Women Go to Work to Relax

    Working women, do you feel like you need a vacation from your vacation? Cheer up: it's almost time to go back to work. A recent study from the Council on Contemporary Families found that while both women and men have lower levels of stress at work than at home, women reported being happier at the office than they were at home.

  • Was Jill Abramson Fired for Asking for Fair Pay?

    On Wednesday, The New York Times dismissed executive editor Jill Abramson and replaced her with Dean Baquet, the managing editor. Unusually for a high-profile media outlet making a big change in leadership, the Times didn't attempt to characterize the shift as a mutual decision. The only real question was why Abramson was fired.

  • Here's What the Working Moms in Your Office Really Want for Mother's Day

    Chances are, you work with at least a few parents, any of whom can tell you that juggling work and family is just about the hardest work-life balance trick to pull off. Today, as we celebrate Mother's Day, think about what the working moms at your company really want. (It is not a bouquet or a box of chocolates.)

  • The Glass Cliff: Why Women CEOs Are More Likely to Be Fired

    Over the past decade, 38 percent of female CEOs at the world's 2,500 largest companies have been forced out, as opposed to 27 percent of men, according to a recent study from Strategy& (formerly Booz & Company). Why? Well, one theory is the "Glass Cliff."

  • Why Obama's Executive Order Against Pay Secrecy Matters

    On April 8, 2014, President Obama signed the Non-Retaliation for Disclosure of Compensation Information into law. This executive order prohibits federal contractors from retaliating against workers who discuss their wages and salaries, but even if you don't work for the government, it's part of a trend that could affect your working life.

  • Where's the Best Place to Be a Working Mom? Not the US

    Every year, the nonprofit organization Save the Children ranks the best and worst countries in which to be a mother, based on factors like maternal health, economic status, and educational attainment. This year, the US ranked 31st out of 178 countries. Here's why that matters to you and your career.

  • Some NFL Cheerleaders Earn Less Than Minimum Wage
    Most of us don't work in exchange for perks. Instead, we agree to pay that equals at least the minimum wage and expect to be paid for hours worked. Unless, of course, you are a cheerleader. Recent lawsuits brought against several NFL teams are shedding light on the alleged exploitation of women who are employed as cheerleaders.
  • Why Aren't More Women Choosing to Become Scientists?
    Nearly 15 years have passed since the dawn of the 21st Century and still the field of science represents the dark ages in terms of gender equality. According to the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, in 2010, only 19.4 percent of doctoral degrees awarded in physics went to women and females represented a scant 17.6 percent of scientists employed as a physicist or astronomer. Why is it that women are so underrepresented in the science equation?
  • When It Comes to Drinking at Work, the Rules Are Different for Women

    Need proof that the Mad Men era isn't totally behind us? Consider Dr. Peggy Drexler's recent (really good) advice to women at work, published in Hello, Giggles:

  • Tell Me Your Salary, I'll Tell You Mine
    If you were absolutely sure your boss couldn't retaliate against you for revealing your salary to your co-workers, would you tell? Thanks to improved worker protections, we might soon find out.
  • 3 Career Lessons From Beyonce

    Time's annual 100 Most Influential People issue is out, and Beyonce has the cover spot. What makes Bey the Queen? In the words of Sheryl Sandberg, who interviewed Beyonce for the magazine, "Beyonce doesn't just sit at the table. She builds a new one."

  • Are Women Better Leaders of Ethnically Diverse Countries?

    Companies rightly want ethnically diverse teams, to reflect the population of the countries that make up their customer base. But governing an ethnically diverse country is not without its challenges. A new study takes a look at the role of gender in successful leadership, and finds that the countries that pull off both economic success and diversity all have one variable in common: a female head of state.

  • Phyllis Schlafly Thinks Pay Equality Will Make It Harder to Get Married

    Single women with careers, would you like to get married someday? Well, Phyllis Schlafly, conservative speaker and founder of Eagle Forum, thinks that if you want equal pay, you better give up on those dreams of finding a soulmate.

  • 3 Terrible Pieces of Career Advice for Women

    Are you sick of just about every buzzword or phrase that applies to women's careers in the 21st century? You're not alone. Being a woman with a career in 2014 means navigating a minefield of conflicting advice and ideologies. Here are the biggest pitfalls to dodge.

  • Learn to Love 'Bad' Grades, Make More Money Later On

    Why do fewer women major in STEM fields? In part, research suggests, it's because they don't want to risk earning less-than-amazing grades -- even if a B in a science field would allow them to graduate with a better-paying degree than an A in humanities.

  • The Gender Pay Gap: Do We Need More Laws or More Enforcement?
    Women deserve equal pay for equal work. There are laws on the books dating back to 1963 that are designed to protect women from being paid less than men for doing the same work. However, we continue to see complaints, such as the one against the owners of Kay Jewelers and Jared, from allegedly underpaid female employees. Is the answer more laws, or more enforcement?