• PayScale at SXSW: Economic Mobility Through Education, and What Employers Really Want From Grads
    SXSWedu began as a regional event focusing on K-12 education in Texas, but since its inception in 2011, it has evolved into an international conference on what makes education work for students and educators. SXSWedu Conference & Festival now offers 300 sessions and workshops, 700 speakers, and an Education Expo. This year, PayScale is participating in two panel discussions: Economic Mobility Through Education, and What Employers Want Most and Get Least from Grads.
  • Want a Good Day? Don't Do These 7 Things Before 10 a.m.
    The beginning of your workday is important. Many people feel as though they get the most accomplished during the first couple hours of the day, whereas others take a while to get warmed up. Whichever camp you fall into, these early morning minutes set the tone for the rest of the day. There are some things you should never ever do during these critical hours. Avoiding them should help you get your day started on the right foot.
  • Forbes: Today's Billionaires Are Younger, 'Poorer,' More Numerous
    Bill Gates topped Forbes' 2015 billionaires list, and the other top names will look equally familiar, including Carlos Slim Helu (No. 2) and Warren Buffett (up to No. 3 this year, and the biggest gainer on the list). Elsewhere, though, the list contained plenty of shakeups and new faces.
  • When Is a High-Paying Job Not Worth It?
    You've been offered a job that you're not sure about when suddenly the talk turns to salary -- and the employer is prepared to pay you a lot more than you ever imagined. As visions of a new car and luxurious vacations dance in your head, you quickly forget your initial reservations. A nice paycheck can certainly make up for a lot of faults, but it doesn't guarantee happiness.
  • 10 Career Lessons From #ReasonYouWereFiredInTwoWords
    The last thing you should do, if you get fired, is tweet about it -- especially in the heat of the moment, when you're embarrassed and trying to gather up the tattered bits of your dignity. If you've got a severance package, blabbing could even jeopardize it. No matter what, you want to look professional. No one wants to hire the person who complained about their former employer on social media, even if that employer really deserved it.
  • 5 Things Recruiters Won't Tell You (But Should)
    It's a tough job market out there, and trying to get noticed and remembered may seem a daunting task. Recruiters and job interviewers seldom give feedback to those who don't make the grade. Here's what you need to know.
  • Does Your Face Reveal Your Job?
    If you're a leader in business, sports, or the military, people might be able to tell just by looking at your face, according to recent research published in The Leadership Quarterly. A team led by Christopher Y. Olivola of the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon found that participants could identify occupations for leaders "with above-chance accuracy."
  • No One Listens to Chicken Little
    Want to ensure that none of your co-workers listen to a word you say? Be the office Chicken Little. While cautious skepticism definitely has its place in any team environment, consistently negative people are unlikely to be heard -- even if they have something important to say.
  • 5 Tricks to Calm Down Before a Big Job Interview
    It's a cruel fact of the job search process: just when you need to have your wits about you, the pressure of acing the job interview makes it hard to project calm professionalism. If only you could be as relaxed before the interview as you inevitably will be after -- when all you have to do is think about how much better you'd be, if you could just do everything over again.
  • 4 Ways to Take Control of Your Workday
    The typical American worker is stretched too thin. We have more to do in a day than anyone could possibly accomplish. We feel besieged by an ever-evolving list of action items that drain our intellectual and emotional resources, and our time. Here's how to reclaim control of time at work, as well as work smarter and maybe not so darn hard.
  • PayScale's VIP Blog Roundup: Everything Is a Crisis, Flat Wages, and Sinister Office Remodeling
    The past couple of years have been rough on everyone. If you managed to make it through the post-recession landscape without getting laid off yourself, chances are, you know someone who wasn't so lucky. Small wonder, then, that many workers are a bit anxious. This week's roundup looks at how to handle work anxiety and how to tell if layoff fears are justified. Plus: an explanation of why the economy is improving, but your paycheck isn't.
  • 5 Easy Ways to Be Happier at Work
    In a perfect world, we'd be able to walk away from less-than-awesome jobs, preferably after making a well-scripted scene that somehow has no lasting repercussions for our professional futures. In real life, however, being able to ditch an unwanted job at a moment's notice is as rare as a meet-cute on public transit with the love of your life. It's the stuff of romantic comedies, in other words. If you want to improve your life immediately, your best bet isn't ditching your job; it's learning how to make your life better while you sneakily make long-term plans to secure new employment.
  • These 5 Jobs Have the Worst Gender Wage Gap
    Women make about 80 percent of what men earn, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is a big improvement over 30 years ago, when the number was 65.7 percent, but far from pay equity. PayScale's research on the gender wage gap shows that some of the continued disparity between male and female pay is due to occupational "choice," i.e. women opting for lower-paying jobs that give back and allow more flexibility. But lower pay for women can't entirely be explained by job type. In fact, some of the highest-paying industries also feature the largest pay gaps.
  • 4 Great Reasons to Doodle at Work
    Doodling, an act as old as note-taking itself, is better understood than it once was. It turns out, there may be some real benefits to this activity that could make you more creative, productive, and focused. Here's why the practice is gaining acceptance and popularity in more and more workplaces.
  • A New/Old Strategy for Career Success: Handwritten Letters
    When's the last time you wrote a letter by hand? If you're like many of us, it was probably the last time you had to write an actual thank-you note -- your wedding, perhaps, or a childhood birthday. If you are already short on time, the idea of adding such a labor-intensive project to your to-do list can seem overwhelming. But taking 10 minutes a week to send at least one handwritten letter can provide a networking boost that email can't offer.
  • 3 Things You Can Negotiate Besides Money
    Deserve more money? The first step is negotiating a higher salary, either after receiving a new job offer or during the annual review. However, sometimes employers can't pay more. This does not mean that they can't afford to help by offering a better benefits package. Benefits packages are more than healthcare and a retirement plan; be creative and ask for what you want.
  • 3 Ways to Be Productive When You Only Have 5 Minutes
    If only we could combine all those five-minute segments of time while we're on hold or idling in a meeting room, waiting for the other participants to appear, we could knock another item off our to-do lists almost every day. (Or, at least, take lunch away from our desks now and then.) Failing major changes to the way time and space work, the best we can do is take advantage of those minutes where we find them.
  • Just How Common Is Age Discrimination?
    Race- and sex-based discrimination are such hot topics in the media that one can easily forget that other types of employment discrimination are all too commonplace. While the number of age discrimination cases in the United States is dropping a little bit as the economy improves, the numbers are still shockingly high.
  • 5 Career Lessons From Leslie Knope
    The last episode of Parks and Recreation airs tonight, and while the show was never a runaway ratings hit, it holds a special place in many people's hearts. In no small part, this is because of its heroine, Leslie Knope, whose relentless energy and enthusiasm for even the drudge work involved in government service was an inspiration for every lady who's ever decorated her cubicle with pictures of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Hillary Clinton. Plus, she loves waffles: "We need to remember what's important in life: friends, waffles, work. Or waffles, friends, work. Doesn't matter, but work is third." Priorities!
  • How the Great Recession Changed Millennials' Lives Forever
    It's not easy to "make it" in this country on your own. Every generation has struggled to find their professional path, to gain intellectual, personal, and financial independence, and establish a life for themselves. But, there is no doubt that the latest generation to enter the workforce, the Millennials, has had an especially difficult time getting started.