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  • 8 Tips to Prepare for a Panel Interview
    The recruiter sounds very excited on the phone: "I've scheduled you for a panel interview with our managers next Tuesday a.m. I look forward to meeting with you. Do you have any questions for me?" You hear "panel interview" and you freeze. Handling one interviewer at a time is a task, so a panel interview is not exactly the best news. But hold on, before you sweat the phone out of your hand. Understand a bit more about panel interviews to know how to ace them.
  • It's Not Just About STEM: The Case for a Well-Rounded Education
    With the high cost of post-secondary education, you could be forgiven for wondering whether it's worth it to take classes unrelated to job training. Specifically, many students feel pressure to concentrate on STEM degrees, which yield the highest dollar-for-dollar return on investment. While the desire to be employable is good, foregoing a well-rounded education is short-sighted. Even if you're fortunate enough to love science and math, here's why you should leave the engineering department once in a while, in order to maximize your college experience.
  • Will You Change Careers in 2015?
    You know the saying: "A new year. A new you." Why not apply that to your career, too? If you're looking for a career change in the new year, then you might want to check out the top occupations the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects as the most promising, broken down by highest paying, fastest growing, and most new availabilities.
  • This Is What's Stopping You From Getting the Salary You Deserve
    More than half of respondents to PayScale's salary survey have never negotiated their salary, according to data gathered for our recent Salary Negotiation Guide, despite the fact that 75 percent of those who asked received a bump in pay, and 44 percent even got the entire sum they requested. Furthermore, research suggests that many of the non-negotiators consider themselves to be underpaid. So why don't people ask more often?
  • 5 At-Home Business Ideas for Stay-at-Home Parents
    Childcare is expensive, but so is opting out of your career to be a stay-at-home parent. If you want to leave the rat race, but keep investing in your professional development (and 401k), starting your own at-home business might be the answer. Becoming your own boss doesn't have to be scary -- actually, it can be enjoyable and empowering at the same time.
  • How Being Funny Can Help You Get (or Lose) the Job
    Humor has the potential to ease social situations when used in the right context and in the right spirit, and where do we need that more than in the office? Workplace humor can be tricky, however. While it can help alleviate stress, increase bonhomie, and make you a sought-after colleague, it can also brand you as insensitive, unprofessional, and crass. The content, subject, and intent of your jokes can make or dent your image.
  • 7 Tips for College Freshmen
    For many college freshmen, this is an exciting time of year. With the first semester behind you, your first round of exams accomplished, and your first big break wrapping up, it's time to head back to school, a place that's hopefully feeling more and more like a second home every day. Whether you’re a brand-new student just starting out this semester, or a returning freshman, these tips should help you succeed, and enjoy, as you set off on the first phase of your college career.
  • How Our Professional Lives Will Change in 2015
    As you prepare to make 2015 an excellent year, you might want to think about how the workplace is changing. Of course, it's not like a switch flips on January 1, neatly dividing the corporate trends of 2014 from 2015. But the first month of the year is still a good time to think about how work is evolving, right before our very eyes -- and what we can do to make our careers truly satisfying between now and next New Year's Eve.
  • Positive Self-Talk Is Self-Defeating
    Who wouldn't want to believe that wishing hard enough makes good things happen? Unfortunately, the reality is quite different, no matter how hard self-help authors might try to convince us otherwise. Instead of visualizing what you want, you must plan ahead and do the hard work required to meet your goals. As a matter of fact, all that positive self-talk and fantasizing about where you will be five years may be holding you back.
  • It's Not Too Late to Make These 5 Resolutions and Jumpstart Your Career
    You might have made a hefty list of New Year's resolutions for improved health, wealth and happiness, but by the end of the first full week of 2015, you're cold, tired, and overwhelmed. It just didn't go as well as you'd hoped, and you're really already over the whole resolution thing. (By the way, you're not alone. Statistically, 25 percent of those who make a New Year's resolution don't make it past the first week.) So should you just give up, and try again next year?
  • What We Know So Far About Obama's Plan for Free Community College
    Yesterday, President Obama unveiled his plan to offer eligible college students two years of community college for free. More information about the America's College Promise proposal will be revealed today, alongside an American Technical Training Fund proposal, which would expand technical training programs that meet employer's needs and prepare more Americans for higher paying jobs. Here's what we know about the plan right now.
  • PayScale's Weekly VIP Blog Roundup: Make Big Changes, Forget About Self-Sufficiency, and Stay on the Boss's Good Side
    New year, same old career? If you ever needed proof that January 1 is just a day on the calendar, the week after the holidays might provide it. But just because the beginning of a new year isn't automatically a new start at work, doesn't mean that you can't use the fresh page in your planner to inspire you to make changes, large and small, that can make 2015 the best year of your career so far.
  • BLS Jobs Report: 252,000 Jobs Added, But Wages Remain Soft
    This morning's release from the Labor Department showed an increase of 252,000 jobs, beating economists' expectations of 240,000 added jobs, and a decline in the unemployment rate from 5.8 percent in November to 5.6 percent in December. This is the lowest unemployment rate since June, 2008. In addition, last month's blockbuster report was revised upward from 321,000 jobs to 353,000 jobs. Wages, however, actually declined slightly from last month.
  • 5 Tips for Coping With an Unhappy Co-worker
    Everyone has a bad day once in a while, and offering support to co-workers is the kind approach in these instances. However, sometimes a colleague is chronically unhappy, spreading gloom day after day. Maybe they complain a lot -- about work, their personal life, or both. Perhaps it's just the way they sulk around the office, or it's the miserable countenance they wear every time you're in a meeting together. No matter how the condition manifests itself, working with someone who is persistently unhappy can be a real drag, to say the least.
  • Ban the Box: What You Need to Know About Your Employment Rights and Criminal Convictions
    Whether you are applying to serve fast food, work on a construction site, style hair, teach, or be a tattoo artist, almost all job applications have had one thing in common for years. They ask the question, "Have you ever been convicted of a crime?" And whether your answer is yes because of a silly trespassing charge you picked up as the result of a childhood prank or your answer is yes because you spent serious time in prison at some point in your past, the result has historically been the same. Either you tell the truth and you don't get the job because you have a conviction, or you lie and you run the risk of ultimately being fired when your employer does a background check. Either way, for generations you have had no recourse. However, in some parts of the country this is changing as various states and municipalities enact "Ban the Box" legislation.
  • The Case for Taking a Real Lunch Break
    In a work-obsessed culture, it can seem important to get the job done, and done quickly, even if it that often means putting deadlines ahead of health and happiness. If there's any free time, a concept that might seem strange to many working professionals, it's spent in assessing possible project areas to increase revenue and improve the profitability of the company. But just because corporate culture doesn't place a value on lunch breaks, doesn't mean that it's good for productivity to skip them. If taking lunch does not figure anywhere in your priority list, maybe it is time to take another look at your planner.
  • Do These 7 Things on LinkedIn and Get Hired in 3 Months, Says LinkedIn [infographic]
    LinkedIn published an infographic outlining a study they conducted on 4,000 job seekers who were able to land a job within three months of applying by doing a few simple things on the social network. We're here to walk you through some of those steps so, you too, can be like the cool kids -- or, at least the ones that land jobs in three months.
  • How to Negotiate a Raise in 2015
    Why is it so scary to ask for what you deserve, especially when it involves a dollar amount? For one thing, we live in a society where talking about money is considered tacky, as is blowing your own horn. To get the salary that's appropriate for our experience, skills, and capabilities, you need to get comfortable doing both. PayScale's Salary Negotiation Guide helps you feel more secure asking for a raise or establishing your starting pay by breaking the process into three parts: research, strategy, and negotiating.
  • 5 Ways to Get Organized and Prep for Your Best Year Yet
    Now that the holiday craze has died down and it's back to reality, it's time to get serious about what lies ahead for 2015. Before you dive headfirst into your new year's resolutions list (which you dusted off from last year), we've compiled a list that will help you get your life and career on track for the coming year.
  • Choice Blindness: You Really Don't Know What You Are Doing
    When we make decisions at work, we are often asked to explain or defend our choices before and even after they have been put into effect. Studies show that people often are not aware of their choices after they have made them, and this "choice blindness" may have serious effects upon their behavior at work.