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  • BLS Jobs Report: 321,000 Jobs Added, Beating Expectations
    Prior to this morning's report from the Labor Department, economists were predicting gains of 230,000 jobs for November. Instead, The Employment Situation Summary reported the addition of 321,000 jobs to non-farm payrolls last month. This marks the tenth straight month of 200,000-plus job gains. Unemployment held steady from last month's report at 5.8 percent.
  • Why You Should Never Lie During the Job Interview Process
    Whatever you do, don’t blatantly lie -- not on your resume, not in the interview. There are only two outcomes to lying for a job: you get caught and you don’t get caught. Either way, the impact of your lie can be long-lasting. It can surface at any point, during an investigation, a job promotion, even a transfer.
  • When Discrimination Is Allowed: About Bona Fide Occupational Qualifications
    As a general rule, employers are not allowed to discriminate based on certain factors like sex and sometimes age. However, what many people do not understand is that anti-discrimination laws like the Civil Rights Act or the Age Discrimination in Employment Act actually do allow for discrimination under some circumstances. One time employers are allowed to discriminate is if they are doing so because of a "bona fide occupational qualification." Both federal and most state anti-discrimination laws also allow for this defense.
  • 3 Ways Learning a Language Could Boost Your Career
    The world has changed so much in the last couple of decades. Technology has shifted the way we work in fundamental ways. As a result, skills that used to be highly valued in a professional context have become less important, and other skills and talents are coming into sharper focus. Professionals need to bring something to the table that can't be achieved by a machine. Traits like creative talent, an ability to multitask, and excellent interpersonal skills are becoming increasingly important. Learning a new language might give you that extra edge you've been searching for.
  • 3 Insights for Millennial Workers, From Anne Krook
    There's plenty of handwringing when it comes to the fate of younger workers, but precious little in the way of actual advice on the way to build a career in a tough economic environment. For PayScale's latest data package, Gen Y on the Job, we sat down with Anne Krook, author of "Now What Do I Say?": Practical Workplace Advice for Younger Women, to get actionable insight into how Millennials can make the most of their strengths.
  • The Pros and Cons of Unions Today
    The labor movement has given the American worker benefits that today are often taken for granted, such as overtime laws, child labor laws, and minimum wages. The right to bargain collectively gives employees the power to demand reasonable treatment without the threat of being replaced by somebody less noisy. However, unions are far from perfect.
  • ADP Jobs Report: Private Sector Added 208,000 Jobs in November
    Private companies added 208,000 jobs to their payrolls last month, according to The ADP National Employment Report. This was lower than economists' predictions of 220,000 jobs, but still in line with the previous six months.
  • 3 Ways to Beat the Holiday Slump
    If you find it more difficult to get stuff done at work during the holiday season, you're not alone: according to one Accountemps survey, 34 percent of senior managers say their employees are less productive around the holidays. Blame the weather, or the fewer number of workdays, or the temptation to shop instead of work, but one thing is clear: if you want to close out the year on a high note, you're going to have to work smart as well as hard.
  • 5 Reasons You Need a Mentor – and How to Find One
    After years of training and education, you've finally landed a great position in your field. But no matter how much preparation you've done, a mentor could help your career, and assist you personally, in profound ways.
  • This Is What Millennials' Dream Job Looks Like
    What makes a good job great? Well, excellent pay, for one thing. PayScale's various data packages show that money almost always wins, when it comes to workers' priorities -- or, at least, their stated values. Beyond pay, however, there are other job attributes that appeal to workers. Gen Y on the Job looks at what Millennials want most at work, and what they're prepared to compromise on, in order to get it.
  • What Uber Looks for in Employees
    Uber is one of those companies that everyone loves -- and at the same time, everyone loves to hate. The past few weeks, the company has been embroiled in a media frenzy, after Emil Michael, an Uber executive, made personal threats to a well-respected female tech journalist. After, Uber announced that Michael would not be fired.
  • Don't Let Your Resume Read Like an Obituary
    Resumes are rarely enthralling reads. In attempting to squeeze as much information as possible onto one page, people tend to end up with a dull, lifeless account of their career that would put most recruiters to sleep. But your resume doesn't have to read like an obituary. It only takes a bit of editing to bring life to a boring resume. The key is striking that balance between overly formal and too casual in order to create a resume that is polished, professional, and dynamic.
  • How to Get the Job When You Are Overqualified
    Sometimes, the job interview process feels like damned if you do, damned if you don't. You make a point of educating yourself, developing skills, and applying for jobs that in your area of expertise. Then you hear it: "you're overqualified." Understand why employers think this is a bad thing, and be ready to make your case in your next job interview.
  • 3 Ways to Get Ready for Your Year-End Review
    Ninety percent of companies do annual reviews, according to the Society for Human Resource Management, despite the fact that at least 60 percent of workers -- including managers -- dislike the review process. Many organizations compound the problem by having their evaluations at the tail-end of the year, when workers are feeling their least productive and focused. Of course, if your company does things this way, it's unlikely that you'll talk them out of it, no matter how solid your arguments are for change. The best you can do, as a worker, is to prepare.
  • You Sit Too Much; Here's What to Do About It [infographic]
    American workers spend 21 hours a day being sedentary, and only three hours being active, according to research from Ergotron and research firm Research Now. In fact, 86 percent of respondents said that they sit "all day, every day," despite the fact that 70 percent said they hate sitting. Worst of all, more than half of those surveyed said that when they do get up, they use "getting food" as an excuse. Given that most companies aren't going to shell out for treadmill desks for everyone, is there any way to minimize the amount of sitting we're doing?
  • Choose Your Company Culture Wisely
    Corporate culture affects employee behavior. This goes far beyond working hard to get something turned in because your boss wants it yesterday. People's ethical and personal decisions are based in part upon the values of the organization that employs them. Therefore, consider the culture of a company before you accept a job.
  • 4 Tiny Changes That Will Help You Work Smarter, Not Harder
    Many of us live to work, rather than work to live. According to the Department of Labor, the average American between the ages of 25-54 with children spends a whopping 8.7 hours on "working and related activities" each day, but only one hour on "eating and drinking" and two-and-half on "leisure and sports." While you're unlikely to convince the boss to let you cut your day short in favor of spending more time watching TV, you might be able to make a few small changes that boost productivity and get you out the door as soon as possible. Plus, if you take care of yourself, your time at work will be more pleasant.
  • 3 Ways Your Husband Could Be Holding You Back Professionally
    If you're in a happy, committed relationship, the last thing you want to hear is that your wonderful partner might be negatively affecting your career. For working women who are married to men, however, it's important to recognize the ways in which the marriage penalty can crop up, even for childless couples -- through no fault of your husband's.
  • 3 Reasons to Show Gratitude in Your Career (Even When You'd Rather Skip It)
    Have your social media feeds been filling up with thankfulness over the past few days and weeks leading up to Thanksgiving? If these public statements of gratitude make you roll your eyes rather than count your blessings, never fear: we're not here to convince you to join a movement, or even start a journal or buy an app. However, focusing on the positive and remembering the ways in which you're lucky can be good for your career, if you go about things in a way that works for you.
  • When It Comes to Paid Maternity Leave, the US Is Not a Developed Nation
    The arguments over whether companies can afford to offer paid maternity leave go on, but the evidence that what is good for working families is also good for business continues to stack up. In addition to the experience of businesses who do offer paid leave, we must consider that the U.S. is alone as a developed nation that does not mandate paid parental leave. And yet, the other countries are not bankrupt.